R, S

Susan Easton Black, Shauna C. Anderson Young, and Ruth Ellen Maness, section R and S in Legacy of Sacrifice: Missionaries to Scandinavia, 1872–94 (Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, 2007), 377–417.

German Rasmussen

1837–1919

Residence: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 15 March 1892

Missionary labors: Århus Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 5 April 1894

Departure ship: Bravo

Birth date: 21 September 1837

Birthplace: Skærbæk, Taulov, Vejle, Denmark

Father: Hansen, Rasmus

Mother: Germansdatter, Mette Cathrine

Spouse: Koch, Charlotte Wilhelmine Johanna

Marriage date: 19 April 1868

Death date: 13 December 1919

Death place: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

Burial place: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

German was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in the spring of 1867 by Elder C. Halvorsen. Because many years of his life was spent as a sailor, German had the opportunity to travel and visit many of the important ports of the world (see “Funeral Held for German Rasmusson,” Ephraim Enterprise, 20 December 1919). He and his wife immigrated to America in 1868 and settled in Ephraim, Sanpete County, Utah. He is remembered for laboring eight years on the Manti Temple and for his proxy ordinance work for the deceased in that temple (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 204).

In 1892, he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 15 March 1892 and was assigned to labor in the Århus Conference. He served in the cities of Odense, Odense County, and Fredericia, Vejle County. He also served in Schlesvig, Germany. After completing an honorable mission, German departed from Copenhagen on 5 April 1894 aboard the steamer Bravo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 327–28, 336; Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 204).

He returned to Ephraim, where he was a farmer and carpenter. He resided there until his death from general debility in 1919 at age eighty-two (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 204).


Morten Rasmussen

1834–85

Residence: Mount Pleasant, Sanpete Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 5 November 1881

Missionary labors: Århus Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 15 June 1883

Departure ship: Pacific (Milo)

Birth date: 27 October 1834

Birthplace: Højhuset, Brændekilde, Odense, Denmark

Father: Rasmussen, Rasmus

Mother: Jensdatter, Maren

Spouse: Christiansen, Karen Marie

Marriage date: 1 April 1859

Marriage place: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

Death date: 28 June 1885

Death place: Mount Pleasant, Sanpete Co., Utah

Burial place: Mount Pleasant, Sanpete Co., Utah

From his early youth, Morten lived with his Uncle Lars Jensen, who was like a father to him. In 1851, he introduced the missionaries to his uncle, a minister of the Lutheran Church. After listening to their message, Uncle Lars, Morten, and other family members were baptized (see Domenichello, “History of Morten Rasmussen and Karen Marie Christiansen Rasmussen,” 1).

In 1853, Morten and two of his cousins immigrated aboard the Benjamin Adams to New Orleans and then joined with the Hans Peter Olsen ox team company to reach the Salt Lake Valley on 5 October 1854. Morton worked for three years in Big Cottonwood Canyon before settling in Ephraim, Sanpete County, with his uncle (see Domenichello, “History of Morten Rasmussen and Karen Marie Christiansen Rasmussen,” 2).

In 1858, he went to Spring Creek, Iron County, to reestablish the settlement that had been destroyed by Indians. There he helped build fort walls. But when the Black Hawk War broke out in 1863, he left the construction effort to serve as a minuteman. After the war, he was viewed as a wealthy man because he owned a home, two pairs of mules, a team of horses, and two good wagons. In 1869, when the Mount Pleasant ZCMI was organized, he became a stockholder. The small company prospered, and so did Morten, who built a two-story brick house in 1879 (see Domenichello, “History of Morten Rasmussen and Karen Marie Christiansen Rasmussen,” 7–11).

In 1881, he left his wealth and family to accept a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 5 November 1881 and was assigned to labor in the Århus Conference (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 262, 264). He served in the island of Fyen (Svendborg and Odense counties), “near his boyhood home.” At the close of an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 15 June 1883 with his brother Rasmus (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 269; Domenichello, “History of Morten Rasmussen and Karen Marie Christiansen Rasmussen,” 12).

Returning to Mount Pleasant, Morten served on the city council as well as in the Sixty-sixth Quorum of the Seventy. He was a county commissioner and a ward teacher. At age fifty, he died of a heart attack. The Mount Pleasant city council drafted a resolution calling him a “faithful husband and a kind and indulgent father” as well as “an honorable citizen, a wise counselor, and a true and honest friend, who by his exemplary life and by his charity and benevolence among us has won the love and esteem of all as a man of God and a friend of humanity” (Domenichello, “History of Morten Rasmussen and Karen Marie Christiansen Rasmussen,” 12–13; Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, 1120).


Niels Rasmussen

1829–1901

Residence: Parowan, Iron Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 3 May 1882

Missionary labors: Copenhagen Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 6 June 1884

Departure ship: Panther

Birth date: 3 August 1829

Birthplace: Thoreby, Toreby, Maribo, Denmark

Father: Jørgensen, Rasmus

Mother: Johansdatter, Ann Kathrine

Spouse: Morris, Mary Ann

Marriage date: 28 December 1865

Marriage place: Parowan, Iron Co., Utah

Death date: 7 January 1901

Death place: Parowan, Iron Co., Utah

On 24 November 1853, Niels joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. In 1856, he was ordained an elder and accepted a local mission call. On the mission, he baptized thirty-three converts. In 1857, he immigrated to Utah with a handcart company and settled in Parowan, Iron County. He is remembered for serving as a night guard in 1863, 1864, and 1868 (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 205). The 1870, 1880, and 1900, U.S. censuses list his occupation as a farmer.

In 1882, Niels accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 3 May 1882 and was assigned to labor in the Copenhagen Conference as the presiding elder in Lolland, Falster, Maribo County, and Möen, Præstø County. He baptized thirteen converts in those locales. He departed from Copenhagen on 6 June 1884 aboard the steamer Panther (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 267–68, 279).

After returning to Parowan, he was ordained a high priest on 4 April 1898 by David H. Cannon. He died in 1901 in Parowan at age seventy-one (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 205).


Niels Peter Rasmussen

1843–1919

Residence: Levan, Juab Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 24 September 1878

Missionary labors: Ålborg Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 5 July 1880

Departure ship: Leo (Cato)

Birth date: 27 October 1843

Birthplace: Ejegod, Nykjøbing Falster, Maribo, Denmark

Father: Rasmussen, Peder

Mother: Olsdatter, Bodil

Spouse: Christensen, Ane Christine Maria

Marriage date: 16 November 1866

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Mortensen, Maggie Amelia

Marriage date: June 1919

Death date: 1 November 1919

Death place: Levan, Juab Co., Utah

Burial place: Levan, Juab Co., Utah

Niels was baptized on 3 July 1861 by P. C. Nielsen. He labored as a local missionary on Falster Isle (Maribo County) for six months before immigrating to America. He arrived in Salt Lake City on 28 September 1862. Four years later, he was married to Ane Christensen by Wilford Woodruff (see “Levan Loses One of Its Prominent Citizens,” Deseret News, 10 November 1919).

He and his bride resided in Big Cottonwood Canyon for two years before settling in Bear River City, Box Elder County. In this new community, Niels was employed as a teacher and a justice of the peace. In 1874 he returned to Salt Lake City and worked in the “Elephant Store.” By 1876 he had moved his family to Levan, Juab County, where he enjoyed farming and teaching (see “Levan Loses One of Its Prominent Citizens,” Deseret News, 10 November 1919).

He accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1878. He arrived in Copenhagen on 24 September 1878 and was assigned to be president of the Oernes Branch and later president of the Ålborg Conference. After completing an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 5 July 1890 as a leader of the emigrating Latter-day Saints (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 235–36, 244).

After returning to Levan, Niels was ordained a high priest and a bishop on 17 April 1892 by Anthon H. Lund. For ten years, he served as bishop of the Levan Ward. At the same time, he also served as a justice of the peace, a notary public, a county commissioner, and a school trustee. He died in 1919 in Levan at age seventy-six. His funeral service was held in the Levan meetinghouse (see “Levan Loses One of Its Prominent Citizens,” Deseret News, 10 November 1919; A History of Levan, 54, 64).


Rasmus Rasmussen

(Rasmus Christophersen)

1835–1911

Residence: Mink Creek, Franklin Co., Idaho

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 3 November 1885

Missionary labors: Copenhagen Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 29 September 1887

Departure ship: Bravo

Birth date: 4 November 1835

Birthplace: Sønder Alslev, Maribo, Denmark

Father: Rasmussen, Christopher

Mother: Clausdatter, Kirsten

Spouse: Clemmonsdatter, Anne

Marriage date: 27 April 1860

Marriage place: Denmark

Spouse: Valentine, Hannah

Marriage date: June 1877

Spouse: Bengston, Johanna

Marriage date: 22 January 1879

Spouse: Mortensen, Karen

Marriage date: June 1885

Spouse: Hogensen, Elise

Marriage date: 4 November 1898

Marriage place: Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 19 June 1911

Death place: Mink Creek, Franklin Co., Idaho

Burial place: Mink Creek Cemetery, Mink Creek, Franklin Co., Idaho

Rasmus received the usual “common school” education offered to young boys in Denmark at that time. By age fourteen, he was hired out for fourteen dollars a year, which was paid to his father. By age twenty-five, he was making fifty dollars a year, which he kept for himself (see “Rasmus Rasmussen, Sr.,” 1).

Like most of his contemporaries, Rasmus was drafted into the Danish military. After six months of active service, he was discharged. For the next ten years, he farmed on rented land. During those years, he and his wife accepted the gospel. They were baptized on 13 July 1867. Shortly after his baptism, Rasmus was called to be president of the Falster Branch. He served in this capacity before immigrating to America (see “Rasmus Rasmussen, Sr.,” 1).

He and his family settled in Bear River City, Box Elder County, Utah; then Brigham City, Box Elder County; and finally in Mink Creek, Franklin County, Idaho. In May 1877, he was called to be president of the Mink Creek Branch and two months later bishop of the Mink Creek Ward. He also served as the justice of election, a postmaster, and a judge of the court. Apparently his prominence engendered so much envy that “in the spring of 1885, he was riding ditch and a couple of his rivals for Bishop beat him up with the intentions of putting him in the ditch and making it look like accidental drowning.” Jens Edward Larsen saved him. Rasmus was grateful to Larsen and later gave his daughter Hannah to him in marriage (see “Rasmus Rasmussen, Sr.,” 1).

In 1885, Rasmus accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He was the first missionary to leave from the Mink Creek Ward. He arrived in Copenhagen on 3 November 1885 and was assigned to labor in the Copenhagen Conference. While on this mission, he visited his brother and sister, “walked 3,444 miles, traveled by steamship 90,000 miles, blessed 17 children, and baptized 11 persons” (“Rasmus Rasmussen, Sr.,” 1). After completing an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 29 September 1887 aboard the steamer Bravo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 294–95, 303).

Upon returning to Mink Creek, he was reinstated as bishop and served for twenty-three additional years. While serving as bishop, he was arrested and imprisoned in the Idaho Penitentiary for unlawful cohabitation (see Jenson, Church Chronology, 8 November 1886). When Wilford Woodruff announced the Plural Marriage Manifesto, Rasmus “put away all his wives except the first one [Anne], but continued to support the others.” When Anne died in 1898, he was “very sad and said home isn’t home any more.” However, within months he had married again. In 1900, he was released as bishop of the Mink Creek Ward and moved with his new wife, Elsie Hogensen, to Logan, Cache County (see “Rasmus Rasmussen, Sr.,” 1–2).

Rasmus served a second mission to Denmark from April 1901 to October 1901. Although he “served a good mission,” he was released early due to ill health. After returning home, he was ordained a patriarch. He died of cancer in 1911 in Mink Creek at age seventy-five. His biographer wrote of him, “He endured many hardships without complaint and always kept his faith in the Lord and his loyalty to the Church” (“Rasmus Rasmussen, Sr.,” 2).


Rasmus Rasmussen

1845–1918

Residence: Mount Pleasant, Sanpete Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 15 March 1892

Missionary labors: Århus Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 5 April 1894

Departure ship: Bravo

Birth date: 20 September 1845

Birthplace: Bræendekilde, Odense, Denmark

Father: Rasmussen, Rasmus

Mother: Jensen, Maren

Spouse: Hansen, Maren Kirstine

Marriage date: 2 April 1877

Marriage place: Hojby, Odense, Denmark

Death date: 25 December 1918

Death place: Mount Pleasant, Sanpete Co., Utah

Burial place: Mount Pleasant, Sanpete Co., Utah

In 1854, Rasmus’s older brother Morten joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Morten returned to Denmark as a missionary in 1881 and converted Rasmus and his wife. They migrated to America in June of 1883 and settled in Mount Pleasant, Sanpete County, Utah (see correspondence from Allen Rasmussen, 9 August 1999).

In 1892, Rasmus returned to Denmark as a missionary. He arrived in Copenhagen on 15 March 1892 and was assigned to labor in the Århus Conference. After completing an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 5 April 1893 aboard the steamer Bravo bound for Hull, England. From Hull, he traveled by train to Liverpool, where he boarded the steamer Arizona to voyage to America. After arriving in New York Harbor, he traveled by rail to Salt Lake City, arriving on 28 April 1894 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 327–28, 336).

Although he returned to Mount Pleasant, he spent much time in Manti, Sanpete County. In that community, he did temple work for his kindred dead from lists of genealogy that he had brought from Denmark. In 1907, he and his wife were able to visit Denmark. The couple had no children. Rasmus died in 1918 in Mount Pleasant at age seventy-three (see correspondence from Allen Rasmussen, 9 August 1999). He had been in poor health for some time and for about five weeks had been confined to his home. His name was synonymous with industry, thrift and strict integrity. In his earlier years, he worked in stone in constructing homes. The rock masonry in the channel of the creek on lower Main Street was mostly his work. The rock was obtained from the old fort wall enclosing the tithing block. Along with Niels Matson, Rasmus excavated the tunnel for the Mount Pleasant mill. In his later years, he farmed (see “Rasmus Rasmussen Answered Final Call,” Mount Pleasant Pyramid, 27 December 1918).


Bengt Mathias Ravsten

(Bengt Matthiasen Rafsten)

1838–1920

Residence: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 6 November 1882

Missionary labors: Göteborg Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 17 October 1884

Departure ship: Bravo

Birth date: 29 August 1838

Birthplace: Toarp, Saxtorp, Malmöhus, Sweden

Father: Rafsten, Matthias Bengtsson

Mother: Persdotter, Elna

Spouse: Johanson, Britta

Marriage date: 9 May 1870

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 16 June 1920

Death place: Clarkston, Cache Co., Utah

Burial place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Bengt and his twin sister were the last of nine children born to Matthias Rafsten. When they were only seven years old, their father died. Bengt had to financially contribute to the support of the family at that time. At age twelve, he froze his hands while working outside in the cold. He could never straighten his fingers after the accident. Nevertheless, he worked as a farm laborer until he was twenty-three years old. Then he learned masonry and worked in a factory (see Ravsten, “Bengt Mathias Ravsten,” 394).

It was in the factory that he heard of missionaries teaching nearby. He and some of his friends decided to “attend, out of curiosity, and to have some fun with the young Elders.” Instead of taunting them, Bengt listened and bought some of their literature. He accepted their teachings and was baptized on 23 November 1862 by John Hagman. Four months later, he was called to serve a local mission. Early in his mission, he was placed in charge of a meeting. “Bengt nearly panicked. He slipped out behind a straw stack and asked the Lord to help him. When he returned to the meeting, the house was filled with investigators. He got the meeting under way and it lasted two hours. Several people were converted” (Ravsten, “Bengt Mathias Ravsten,” 394). During his six years as a local missionary, he also presided over two Swedish branches of the Church (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 207).

He immigrated to America aboard the Minnesota. By 1869, he had arrived in the Salt Lake Valley. In February 1870, he settled in the Bear River Ward in Box Elder County. After his marriage to Britta Johanson, whom he had met aboard the Minnesota, Bengt helped lay the cornerstones of the Logan Temple. He worked on that temple for three years. He then worked as a rock mason for the Union Pacific Railroad, building bridges over waterways throughout northern Utah (see Ravsten, History of Clarkston: The Granary of Cache Valley, 1864–1964, 394). During this same time period, he joined the School of the Prophets and served as a Sunday School teacher and home missionary in Cache County (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 3:700).

In 1882, Bengt accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 6 November 1882 and was assigned to labor in the Göteborg Conference. He presided over that conference until his departure from Copenhagen on 17 October 1884 aboard the steamer Bravo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 268–69, 279, 485).

Returning to Utah, Bengt bought a farm east of Clarkston, Cache County. In 1888, he was selected as the presiding elder of the Trenton Ward (see Ravsten, History of Clarkston: The Granary of Cache Valley, 1864–1964, 394–95). In 1892, he was called to be a president of the Seventh Quorum of the Seventy (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 3:700).

Two years later, Bengt was again needed in Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 6 August 1894 and was assigned to preside over the Malmö Conference. After honorably completing that assignment, he departed from Copenhagen with leadership responsibilities for emigrating Latter-day Saints (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 339, 341, 352–53).

In 1901, Bengt was ordained a high priest. He is credited with serving as proxy for one thousand two hundred deceased persons in the Logan Temple. He remained in good health until his sudden death in 1920 in Clarkston at age eighty-one. As he died, he raised his hand to say farewell to his family (see Ravsten, History of Clarkston: The Granary of Cache Valley, 1864–1964, 395).


Andrew Pehrsson Renström

(Anderias Ericsson)

1857–1933

Residence: Huntsville, Weber Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 13 November 1883

Missionary labors: Stockholm Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 15 October 1885

Departure ship: Bravo

Birth date: 30 December 1857

Birthplace: Rångsta, Viksta, Uppsala, Sweden

Father: Pehrsson, Erik

Mother: Andersdotter, Catharine Christina

Spouse: Petersen, Caroline

Marriage date: 27 June 1888

Marriage place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Death date: 22 January 1933

Death place: Huntsville, Weber Co., Utah

Burial place: Huntsville, Weber Co., Utah

On 14 September 1872, Andrew was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. A year following his baptism, he immigrated to America and settled in Huntsville, Weber County, Utah (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 275).

In 1883, he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 13 November 1883 and was assigned to labor in the Stockholm Conference. He served in the Eskilstuna Branch (Södermanland County) and in the northern part of Sweden. In 1885, he was sent to Finland, which was then a province of Russia. In Finland, he “held meetings with a few Saints” (Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 275). Andrew departed from Copenhagen on 15 October 1885 aboard the steamer Bravo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 274–75, 292).

After returning to Utah, Andrew married and he became a prosperous farmer. In 1888, he served as an assistant president of the Sunday School in Huntsville. In 1889, he was set apart as a counselor to Bishop David O. McKay of the Huntsville Ward. That same year, he interrupted his service in the bishopric to return to Scandinavia to serve a second mission (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 275).

He arrived in Copenhagen on 28 August 1889 and was assigned to labor in the Stockholm Conference. Later he presided over the Göteborg Conference (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 275). In January 1891, he reported that the meetings in Göteborg were better attended than they had been “for several years past.” He also indicated that “in Eskelstuna and vicinity the Elders had held a number of meetings in country districts, but the local Lutheran priest had opposed them and presented some of the old threadbare accusations against the Prophet Joseph Smith and the Saints generally.” At the close of this second mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 28 May 1891 aboard the steamer Cameo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 310, 313, 317).

In 1905, Andrew was sustained as bishop of the Huntsville Ward. He served in that capacity until his wife’s death in 1908. He then fulfilled a home mission in the Ogden Seventh Ward. From 1923 to 1925, he served a third mission in Sweden (see correspondence from Stephen W. Whitesides). Andrew died in 1933 in Huntsville at age seventy-five.


Jacob Rolfsen

(Jacob Bentsen)

1828–83

Residence: Mount Pleasant, Sanpete Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 26 June 1877

Missionary labors: Christiania Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 23 June 1879

Departure ship: Cato

Birth date: 22 March 1828

Birthplace: Risør, Aust Agder, Norway

Father: Rolfsen, Bendt

Mother: Vroldsdatter, Gjertrud Marie

Spouse: Nielsen, Kristine Margarethe

Marriage date: 14 May 1852

Death date: 21 October 1883

Death place: Mount Pleasant, Sanpete Co., Utah

Burial place: Mount Pleasant, Sanpete Co., Utah

On 25 January 1858, Jacob was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (see correspondence from Ethel R. Johnson). In 1861, he immigrated to America and crossed the plains in the Captain Samuel A. Wooley Company to reach the Salt Lake Valley on 22 September 1861. He settled in Ephraim, Sanpete County, before moving to Mount Pleasant, Sanpete County, in 1862. In Mount Pleasant, he served guard duty during the Black Hawk War (History of Sanpete and Emery Counties, Utah, 267).

In 1877, Jacob accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 26 June 1877 and was assigned to labor in the Christiania Conference. From 1878 to 1879, he served as president of that conference. After completing an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 23 June 1879 aboard the steamer Cato (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 230–31, 240, 507).

After returning to Utah, Jacob was ordained a high priest. He supported his family as a carpenter. He worked on the St. George and Manti temples and built benches and a pulpit for his local chapel. He died in 1883 in Mount Pleasant at age fifty-five (see Lythgoe, “History of Jacob Rolfsen,” 1).


Anders Peter Rose

1828–1921

Residence: Hyrum, Cache Co., Utah

Arrival in Copenhagen: 20 November 1878

Missionary Labors: Ålborg and Århus conferences

Departure date from Copenhagen: 28 August 1880

Name of Departure Ship: Otto

Birth date: 8 November 1828

Birthplace: St. Nicolaus-Vejle, Vejle amt, Denmark

Father: Rose, Thomas Pedersen

Mother: Olesdatter, Gjertrude

Spouse: Christiansen, Mette Marie Johnsen

Marriage date: 14 February 1861

Marriage place: Vejle, Vejle amt, Denmark

< lang="DA">Spouse:< lang="DA"> Bager, Jensine Kjerstine Jensen

< lang="DA"> Marriage date: 29 September 1886

Marriage place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Death date: 8 December 1921

Death place: Hyrum, Cache Co., Utah

Burial place: Hyrum, Cache Co., Utah

Anders received a typical education until age fourteen when he was apprenticed to a Mr. Stampe for six years to learn the dyeing trade. He received $1.50 a week plus room and board while an apprentice. In 1848, when Denmark declared war on Germany, Mr. Stampe took refuge on the Isle of Fyen (Svendborg and Odense amt), leaving young Anders in charge of his business. When his employer returned, he was “very satisfied” with the way the business had functioned in his absence. In 1850, Anders was drafted into the navy for nine months. After completing his military obligation, he finished his apprenticeship with Mr. Stampe (see Rose, “Some Episodes in the Life of Anders Peter Rose,” 1–2).

In 1850, Anders attended a debate between a local chaplain and Mormon missionaries in which the Mormons “had the best of it,” but he refused baptism. In 1854, he concluded that he would “be more religious and serve God with full purpose of heart.” He bought a Bible and began to study its contents. For a time, he suffered such great emotional and spiritual torment that he wondered if he were losing his mind. Nevertheless, he felt that God’s “power was always nigh to help me” (Rose, “Some Episodes in the Life of Anders Peter Rose,” 2).

Four years later, he purchased the dyeing business from Mr. Stampe. He then joined the Baptist church but remained a member for only a year after discovering the doctrines lacked priesthood which he felt was “so necessary for it to be God’s people.” He investigated the Lutheran church but again did not find proper authority within that church. In 1860, he studied the teachings of Mormonism and was baptized (Rose, “Some Episodes in the Life of Anders Peter Rose,” 2–3).

In 1861, he married Mette Christiansen, a young woman who had been working for him. The newlyweds “took care of the Mission Home” until they immigrated to Zion. They reached the Salt Lake Valley in September 1861 with the Captain Porter pioneer company. In the Valley, they rented a house for two dollars a month. Anders found work chopping wood in the canyons. He had to walk ten miles to reach the canyon, starting out daily at two or three in the morning. Despite this hardship, he wrote, “I went with willing heart, always remembering my duty to God, to my darling wife, and my fellow men” (see Rose, “Some Episodes in the Life of Anders Peter Rose,” 3–4).

In 1863, Anders was ordained a seventy. One year later, he attempted to move to Cache Valley. A former landlord, claiming that Anders owed him $750, refused to let him leave. The matter was settled in a Church court that concluded in Anders’s favor. He and his brother relocated to Cache Valley, where they purchased two city blocks. Anders worked for the “Church Farm” raising hay. His years in the valley were not prosperous. In 1874, he was called to be a tithing clerk, which was time consuming. Apparently, he was paid for this work, but not much (see Rose, “Some Episodes in the Life of Anders Peter Rose,” 4–6).

To improve his financial circumstances, Anders helped build a wagon road from the valley to the canyon. He started a lumber business as well as a dairy. He eventually homesteaded 160 acres. In the Church, he served as a superintendent of the Sunday School and as a president of the 62nd Quorum of the Seventy. As he prospered in both temporal and spiritual matters, he served his community as a city councilman and mayor (see Rose, “Some Episodes in the Life of Anders Peter Rose,” 6).

In 1878, Anders accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 20 November 1878 and was assigned to labor in the Ålborg and Århus conferences. During the mission, he visited his ninety-three-year-old mother. At the close of an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 28 August 1880 aboard the steamer Otto (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 235–36, 244; Rose, “Some Episodes in the Life of Anders Peter Rose,” 6).

Returning to Utah, he once again established familial relationships. His grandson, Guy Rose, remembered him as a “kind, loving, humble, and spiritual man.” His death certificate states senility as the cause of death in 1921 in Hyrum. He was ninety years old at the time (see Rose, “Some Episodes in the Life of Anders Peter Rose,” 9).


Gustave Larson Rosengren

(Per Gustaf Hansson or Grön)

1847–1928

Residence: Union, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 4 May 1883

Missionary labors: Stockholm and Göteborg conferences

Departure date from Copenhagen: 7 May 1885

Birth date: 10 February 1847

Birthplace: Hyby, Malmöhus, Sweden

Father: Grön (Larsson), Hans

Mother: Pehrsdotter (Dahlström), Anna

Spouse: Christiansen, Anna Sophia

Marriage date: 25 August 1873

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 30 October 1928

Death place: Sandy, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Burial place: Sandy, Salt Lake Co., Utah

On 28 November 1863, Gustave was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints by John Stormfeldt. He was ordained an elder in August 1867 by John Fagerberg. In 1873, he served a local mission in the Skåne and Blekinge conferences. In those conferences, he baptized over one hundred converts and walked over twenty-five thousand miles to share the gospel. That same year, he immigrated to America and settled in Utah. Although he was a baker by trade, he earned his living by farming in several Salt Lake County communities East Jordan, Union, and Sandy (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 2:110).

He was living in Union, Salt Lake County, when he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1883. He arrived in Copenhagen on 4 May 1883 and was assigned to labor in the Stockholm and Göteborg conferences. From October 1884 to May 1885, he was president of the Göteborg Conference (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 209). He labored in the Uppsala Branch for one year and the Örebro Branch for five months. He wrote of this mission that he “had many interesting experiences, having been whipped, driven, stoned and mobbed,” but added that he was always “able to see the hand of Providence in all things.” Despite these difficulties, he baptized a hundred converts (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 2:110). He departed from Copenhagen on 7 May 1885 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 273–74, 292).

Returning to Utah, he served as a Sunday School teacher, ward teacher, clerk, choir member, a president of the Ninety-Third Quorum of the Seventy, and a counselor in the presidency of the Scandinavian meetings in Sandy (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 2:110). Gustave died in 1928 in Sandy at age eighty-one.


John O. Rosenkrantz

(Jöns Olasson Rosenkrans)

1820–1901

Residence: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 28 September 1890

Missionary labors: Skåne Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 16 April 1891

Departure ship: Cameo

Birth date: 4 February 1820

Birthplace: Lövestad, Malmöhus, Sweden

Father: Trulsson, Ola

Mother: Nilsdotter, Elisabeth

Spouse: Bergren, Mätta Mari

Death date: 27 December 1901

Burial place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

As a young man, John learned the trade of smithing. He traveled to various places in Sweden practicing this trade. At some point, he met missionaries of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and accepted their message. He was baptized on 30 August 1876 at Slagtofta (Hörby, Malmöhus) Swedenby J E. Brohman. He was ordained to the office of a priest on 4 March 1877 in Sweden.

Mätti Mari Bergren, John’s wife, was baptized some months later on 8 February 1877. On April 26, John and his wife are listed in the branch records as having “traveled to America.” The Rosencrantz family didn’t come directly to Utah. In the 1880 U. S. Federal Census, they are listed as living in Swede Grove, Meeker County, Minnesota with their young son, John (FHL #1254626, 249a). By 1881, however, they had moved farther west and had settled in Logan, in the Cache Valley area of Utah.

While residing in Logan, John accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1890. He arrived in Copenhagen on 28 September 1890 and was assigned to labor in the Skåne Conference. After completing an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 16 April 1891 aboard the steamer Cameo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 316–18).

Returning to Logan, he resided in the Logan Seventh Ward. He died in 1901 at age eighty-two. At the time of his death, his wife was deceased—she had died five days previous, and they had no living children. He donated his means to the Logan, Salt Lake, and St. George temples, as well as to the Methodist Church (see “Mr. John O. Rosenkrantz,” The Journal, 4 January 1902).


Mons Anderson Mortensen Rosenlund

(Måns Andersson)

1833–1909

Residence: Mount Pleasant, Sanpete Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 3 October 1882

Missionary labors: Skåne Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 9 June 1884

Departure ship: Milo

Birth date: 29 April 1833

Birthplace: Gryttinge, Torrlösa, Malmöhus, Sweden

Father: Mårtensson, Anders

Mother: Larsdotter, Karna

Spouse: Larsdotter, Karna

Marriage date: 3 September 1859

Marriage place: Torrlösa, Malmöhus, Sweden

Spouse: Monson, Christine

Marriage date: 28 August 1884

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 27 February 1909

Death place: Mayfield, Sanpete Co., Utah

Burial place: Mayfield Sanpete Co., Utah

Mons worked as a blacksmith. On 26 January 1868, he was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Following his baptism, he was ordained an elder and called to preside over the Svalöv Branch, Malmöhus County, for three and a half years. In 1873, he immigrated to America and settled in Mount Pleasant, Sanpete County, where he joined the United Order. He also worked on the railroad in Sandy for a time (see Bitton, Guide to Mormon Diaries, 304; Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 210).

In 1882, he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 3 October 1882 and was assigned to labor in the Skåne Conference. He served in the Lund and Helsingborg branches (Malmöhus County). At the close of an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 9 June 1884 aboard the steamer Milo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 267, 269, 279).

In 1885, he and his family were residing in Mayfield, Sanpete County, Utah. There he was ordained a high priest and attended the Mayfield Ward. On 5 March 1889, he was sentenced to eighty-five days in prison for violating the Edmunds-Tucker Law (see Jenson, Church Chronology, 5 March 1889). Mons died in 1909 from kidney trouble in Mayfield at age seventy-five (see “Mons Rosenlund,” Salt Lake Tribune, 28 February 1909).


Peter Trulson Rundquist

(Pehr Trulsson)

1844–1927

Residence: West Jordan, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 12 December 1891

Missionary labors: Skåne Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 4 January 1894

Departure ship: Milo

Birth date: 14 December 1844

Birthplace: Källs-Nöbbelöv, Malmöhus, Sweden

Father: Mattisson, Truls

Mother: Pehrsdotter, Gunilla

Spouse: Nilson, Hannah

Marriage date: 29 July 1872

Marriage place: Utah

Spouse: Johnson, Bengta

Marriage date: 27 April 1877

Marriage place: Utah

Death date: 1 May 1927

Death place: West Jordan, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Burial place: West Jordan Cemetery, West Jordan, Salt Lake Co., Utah

On 30 July 1864, Peter was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints by Martin Lundwall. He served in the Swedish military before being ordained an elder and called on a local mission in the Skåne Conference. He spent six years as a missionary. During those years, he presided over several branches, including the Hälsingborg Branch, Malmöhus County, before being assigned to be a traveling elder (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:592).

In 1871, he immigrated to America and settled in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah. By 1881, he had moved to West Jordan, Salt Lake County, where he supported his family by farming. On 20 March 1887, he was ordained a seventy. Four years later, Peter accepted a mission call to Scandinavia (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:592).

He arrived in Copenhagen on 12 December 1891 and was assigned to labor in the Skåne Conference. He served for four months in the Hälsingborg Branch before presiding over the Karlskrona Branch, Blekinge County, for one year. He then served as president of the Skåne Conference until his release in 1894. He departed from Copenhagen on 4 January 1894 aboard the steamer Milo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 320–21, 337).

After returning to his loved ones in Utah, Peter served as a president of the Thirty-third Quorum of the Seventy and as a ward teacher (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:592).

Peter died at the home of his son in West Jordan at the age of eighty-two years. He was a resident and farmer in West Jordan for forty-six years. He resided in Salt Lake City from 1871 to 1881 (see “West Jordan Resident Forty-Six Years, Dies,” Deseret News, 3 May 1927).


Charles Samuelson

(Carl Samuelson)

1830–1919

Residence: Santaquin, Utah Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 14 September 1880

Missionary labors: Göteborg Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 28 August 1882

Departure ship: Argo

Birth date: 8 February 1830

Birthplace: Kliaryd, Lommaryd, Jönköping, Sweden

Father: Svensson, Samuel

Mother: Danielsdotter, Annie Stina

Spouse: Nielsen, Sophia

Marriage date: 1861

Death date: 30 June 1919

Death place: Santaquin, Utah Co., Utah

Burial place: Santaquin, Utah Co., Utah

On 18 May 1857, Charles was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints by Christian L. Hansen. After his baptism, he served as a traveling missionary in Denmark from 1857 to 1859. In 1861, he married and immigrated to America. He and his bride settled in Santaquin, Utah County, Utah (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 2:503). There, Charles “was active in both ecclesiastical and civic capacities in building up the community” (Santaquin through the Years, 163).

In 1880, he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 14 September 1880 and was assigned to labor in the Göteborg Conference. After serving an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 28 August 1882 aboard the steamer Argo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 250–51, 265).

After returning to his family, Charles was ordained a high priest. He was a farmer and photographer. He served faithfully in his ward until his death in 1919 at age eighty-nine (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 2:503).


Andrew Gustave Sandberg

1863–1933

Residence: Grantsville, Tooele Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 18 November 1884

Missionary labors: Göteborg Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 12 August 1886

Departure ship: Bravo

Birth date: 4 January 1863

Birthplace: Södra Mossen, Grinstad, Älvsborg, Sweden

Father: Sandberg, Swen Olson

Mother: Andersdotter, Anna Stina

Spouse: Orr, Elizabeth McQueen

Marriage date: 21 January 1901

Marriage place: St. John, Tooele Co., Utah

Death date: 24 January 1933

Death place: Grantsville, Tooele Co., Utah

Burial place: Grantsville, Tooele Co., Utah

Anders, a resident of Grantsville, Tooele County, Utah, was ordained a seventy just before his mission to Scandinavia in 1884. In his ordination blessing, given on 7 October 1884, he was told, “Bless you that you may go forth in faith and in the power of God to bear testimony.” He arrived in Copenhagen on 18 November 1884 and was assigned to labor in the Göteborg Conference. At the close of an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 12 August 1886 aboard the steamer Bravo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 282–83, 298).

He died at his home in 1933 in Grantsville at age seventy of infirmities incident to age. Funeral services were held in the First Ward chapel (see “Anders Sandberg,” 1).


John Christian Sandberg

(Jöns Christian Sandberg)

1837–1909

Residence: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 27 November 1875

Missionary labors: Göteborg Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 13 September 1877

Departure ship: Argo

Birth date: 14 November 1837

Birthplace: Flünge, Södra Sandby, Malmöhus, Sweden

Father: Sandberg, Anders Nilsson

Mother: Klemedsdotter, Anna

Spouse: Bergstrom, Juliana (Julia) Charlotta

Marriage date: 28 June 1865

Marriage place: Otoe, Wyoming Co., Nebraska

Spouse: Hagman, Alida

Marriage date: 1 March 1875

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Gabrielsson, Anna Maria

Marriage date: 5 February 1880

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 28 July 1909

Death place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Burial place: Salt Lake City Cemetery, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

In 1861, John was baptized and ordained a teacher in Lund, Malmöhus, Sweden. One year later, he was ordained an elder. From 1864 to 1865, he served as president of the Göteborg Conference, before immigrating to America in May 1865 with 557 Latter-day Saints aboard the steamer Aurora (see Carter, Our Pioneer Heritage, 9:47).

In June 1865, John married Juliana Bergstrom. At the time, they were crossing the plains with the Milo Atwood company. The young couple arrived in the Salt Lake Valley on 8 November 1865. In the valley, John obtained employment constructing the Salt Lake Tabernacle organ. He was viewed as an “intelligent and skillful mechanic” and an “invaluable workman” (Carter, Our Pioneer Heritage, 11:109).

In September 1870, he applied to be a United States citizen. He was denied citizenship because of his belief in plural marriage. The denial was issued by Judge McKean. Eventually, the decision was reversed. John took the oath of citizenship on 11 February 1874 (see Roberts, Comprehensive History of the Church, 5:386–87).

One year later, he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He left his wife and small children to serve the Lord. He arrived in Copenhagen on 27 November 1875 and was assigned to preside over the Göteborg Conference (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 222–23). In January 1877, he became the assistant editor of the Nordstjernan (see Jenson, Encyclopedic History of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 585). In that position, he assisted in the Swedish translation of the Book of Mormon. In spite of a very fulfilling mission, John’s thoughts were never far from home, as suggested by this poem written in August 1877:

My thoughts will always be,

To the West,

Over land and sea,

To the friends that I hold dear

Far in the West,

At the wonderful feast,

In the lovely valley of Zion.

At the close of an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 13 September 1877 aboard the steamer Argo. He was in charge of the emigrating Latter-day Saints aboard the ship (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 230).

In 1880, John became a polygamist. This caused his first wife to leave him. He supported his new family as president of the Swedish Publishing Company, which printed the Svenska Härolden newspaper. The company was housed in his furniture store—Sandberg Furniture Store, located at 108 West South Temple Street in Salt Lake City (see Jenson, Encyclopedic History of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 850).

He closed his furniture business in 1888 and became a guard at the state prison in Sugar House. During these years, he served in a bishopric until 25 March 1906, when he requested a release. John suffered from Bright’s disease. He died at age seventy-two at his home in North Salt Lake, Davis County, having been very feeble the last few weeks of his life. His funeral was held in the Salt Lake Twenty-third Ward (see “John Christian Sandberg,” 1; “Grandpa, John Christian Sandberg’s Little Black Book or The First Step,” 1).


Edmund Sanderson

(Emunds Sandersen)

1855–1905

Residence: Gunnison, Sanpete Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 30 April 1889

Missionary labors: Copenhagen and Ålborg conferences

Departure date from Copenhagen: 17 October 1889

Departure ship: Cameo

Birth date: 7 August 1855

Birthplace: Haarbølle, Fanefjord, Præstø, Denmark

Father: Pedersen, Sander

Mother: Nielsdatter, Christiane (Christeane) Marie

Spouse: Gribble, Jane Ann

Marriage date: 1876

Marriage place: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

Spouse: Jensen, Caroline Christine

Marriage date: 24 August 1888

Marriage place: Manti, Sanpete Co., Utah

Death date: 15 March 1905

Death place: Gunnison, Sanpete Co., Utah

Burial place: Gunnison, Sanpete Co., Utah

In 1866, Edmund’s parents were baptized members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. That same year they immigrated with Edmund to America and settled in the Big Cottonwood Ward in Salt Lake County, Utah (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 211). He was baptized in July 1867.

In 1889, Edmund, a resident of Gunnison, Sanpete County, accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 30 April 1889 and was assigned to labor in the Copenhagen Conference. He served faithfully for eight months before being released from the mission due to illness (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 211). He departed from Copenhagen on 17 October 1889 aboard the steamer Cameo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 310, 313).

After returning to his family in Gunnison, Edmund served as president of the Sixty-fifth Quorum of the Seventy, as a home missionary in the Sanpete Stake, and as a Sunday School teacher. He served his community as mayor (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 211). He died in 1905 in Gunnison at age fifty after a lingering illness lasting several months (see “Former Mayor of Gunnison Dead,” Deseret Evening News, 16 March 1905).


Christian Fischer Schade

1827–1918

Residence: Huntsville, Weber Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 28 May 1872

Missionary labors: Christiania, Århus, and Copenhagen conferences

Departure date from Copenhagen: 18 June 1874

Departure ship: Milo (Humber)

Birth date: 2 May 1827

Birthplace: Kornum, Ålborg, Denmark

Father: Schade, Frederick Ludvig

Mother: Ravn, Margrethe Marie Christine Rasmusdatter

Spouse: Thorstensen, Abelone

Marriage date: 15 August 1856

Marriage place: Løgstør, Ålborg, Denmark

Spouse: Heder, Mary Sophia

Marriage date: 15 September 1866

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 26 August 1918

Death place: Huntsville, Weber Co., Utah

Burial place: Huntsville, Weber Co., Utah

On 18 June 1862, Christian and his wife Abelone Thorstensen were baptized members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints by Niels C. Edlefsen. After their baptism, they immigrated to America aboard the BS Kimball. They crossed the plains with the John Smith Independent Company and arrived in the Salt Lake Valley on 30 September 1862 (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 212). On the journey, Abelone was “very sick and had to ride eight hundred miles. That she recovered and reached the valley was nothing short of a miracle” (Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 2:337).

The young couple settled in Huntsville, Weber County, where Christian worked as a blacksmith (see “Family History—Christian Fischer Schade,” 1). As the years passed, they had no children. With the encouragement of Abelone, Christian courted sixteen-year-old Mary Sophia Heder. Each time he came courting, Mary hid under the bed in fear and disgust. However, neighbors told her family that she must enter into polygamy “or she would be damned.” Her parents persuaded her to marry forty-year-old Christian. Mary bore him five children (see Schade, “Christian Fisher Schade,” 2–3).

In 1872, Christian accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 28 May 1872 and was assigned to labor in the Christiania, Århus, and Copenhagen conferences (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 211, 215). He presided over the Århus Conference for a time (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 2:337). After serving faithfully for two years, he departed from Copenhagen on 18 June 1874 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 219).

After returning to Utah, Christian was ordained a high priest and called to be second counselor to Bishop David O. McKay of Huntsville. He also served in his ward Sunday School presidency and as a home missionary. Civically, he was a school trustee from 1877 to 1881, a sergeant in the state militia, and a “director and treasurer of the Ward ecclesiastical organization” (Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 2:338).

In 1888, he was arrested for unlawful cohabitation, was fined $450, and was imprisoned. After his release, he lived with his first wife until her death. He died in 1918 in Huntsville at age ninety-one (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 2:338).


Thomas Richard Schröder

1864–1949

Residence: Nephi, Juab Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 1 November 1884

Missionary labors: Ålborg Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 8 April 1886

Departure ship: Bravo

Birth date: 11 December 1864

Birthplace: Spring City, Sanpete Co., Utah

Father: Schröder, Thomas Gjode

Mother: Christensen, Kierstine Catherine

Spouse: Goldbransen, Louisa Gustava

Marriage date: 29 November 1900

Marriage place: Ogden, Weber Co., Utah

Death date: 27 September 1949

Death place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Burial place: Salt Lake City Cemetery, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

In 1871, his family moved to Nephi, Juab County, Utah. In that community, Thomas received an elementary education before attending the Brigham Young Academy in Provo, Utah County (see correspondence from Richard S. Schroeder).

He interrupted his studies to accept a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 1 November 1884 and was assigned to labor in the Ålborg Conference. On 1 December 1885, he and two other elders were arrested and imprisoned in Ålborg for preaching the gospel (see Jenson, Church Chronology, 1 December 1885). After being freed from prison, he departed from Copenhagen on 8 April 1886 aboard the steamer Bravo. On his voyage to America, he stopped in England, where he “reportedly ran in the Sheffield Handicap races and held one of the records for many years” (Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 282–83, 296; correspondence from Richard S. Schroeder).

Returning to Utah, he worked as a carpenter. For fifteen years, he sold insurance for Mutual Life Insurance Company of New York. He also acted in the old Salt Lake Theater and formed associations with John Barrymore and other famous actors. At the time of his death in 1949 in Salt Lake City, he was eighty-four years old (see correspondence from Richard S. Schroeder).


Peter Sorensen Sherner

(Søren Peter Lorentzen Schjern)

1850–99

Residence: Ogden, Weber Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 4 May 1883

Missionary labors: Århus Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 19 October 1883

Departure ship: Milo

Birth date: 21 April 1850

Birthplace: Veng, Skanderborg, Denmark

Father: Schjern, Lorentz Hans Christian

Mother: Sørensdatter, Maren

Spouse: Hutchens, Mary Elizabeth

Marriage date: 1 December 1873

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 16 January 1899

Death place: Ogden, Weber Co., Utah

Burial place: Ogden, Weber Co., Utah

Soon after Peter’s birth, his father died from cholera. His paternal grandfather tried to buy Peter from his mother, but she refused and then severed all ties with her in-laws. In 1861 he and his mother and stepfather were baptized members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints by S. Thorsen. Two years later, they immigrated to Utah and settled in Eden, Weber County (see Sherner, “Peter Lorenson Sherner,” 2).

In that small community, his stepfather established a sawmill. Peter ran away from home when his stepfather told him to cut lumber in the mountains. His family never heard from him again. It was reported that they didn’t even look for him (see Sherner, “Peter Lorenson Sherner,” 2).

He ventured to the Ogden Valley, where he obtained work with a Mr. Gates. Gates let Peter live with his family, although all they could offer him was food and a place to sleep in the shed. Peter wore Mr. Gates’s cast-off clothes with the legs and sleeves cut off to fit him (see Sherner, “Peter Lorenson Sherner,” 3).

He later found other work and attended school. In school, he met the girl who would later become his wife. Even though she was only seven or eight years old at that time and he was fourteen, he “said he knew he loved her the first time he saw her.” Peter and Mary Hutchens were married when she was sixteen and he was twenty-three (see Sherner, “Peter Lorenson Sherner,” 3).

Before Peter married, he “began to seriously consider the question of his name. He felt sure that it wasn’t Sorensen because when his stepfather was angry at Peter, he always called him a German.” He found his mother and asked her about it, but she was reluctant to respond. She felt that he should keep the name Sorensen since her maiden name and her second husband’s name were both Sorensen. When he finally discovered that his name was Schierner, he decided to Americanize it, saying that he wanted to be neither a Dane nor a German (see Sherner, “Peter Lorenson Sherner,” 3).

After he married, Peter built a one-room adobe house just outside of Bingham’s Fort. While building his home, he dug into two anthills. For years, his daughter recalled, a “stream of ants marched across the room in summer, from one door to another.” Just behind the house, the land was “gouged out by an old crisscross channel of the Ogden River. It took lots of work with a team and scraper to level the land and make a home there.” But, in spite of these difficulties, the home still stands today at 122 Second Street (see Sherner, “Peter Lorenson Sherner,” 3).

Over the years, Peter increased his holdings to twenty acres. Although he benefited from crops grown on the acreage, his primary income came from being a janitor and teacher at Five Points School. His professional efforts were halted on 8 October 1882, when he accepted a mission call to the northwestern states. He arrived in Minnesota on 22 October 1882. Then, for reasons not stated, he left Minnesota to serve a mission in Denmark. He arrived in Copenhagen on 4 May 1883 and was assigned to labor in the Århus Conference. He worked with the peasants but found that their food made him sick. They ate mainly black bread, which was baked “twice a year and hung to the ceiling, cut with machinery, then soaked in beer” (Shierner, “Peter Lorenson Shierner,” 4). Because of poor health, Peter was honorably released and departed from Copenhagen on 19 October 1883 aboard the steamer Milo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 275).

After this mission, he never regained good health. He stayed awake at night coughing and suffering from terrible headaches. In spite of these health issues, Peter was called to be a president of the Ninety-eighth Quorum of the Seventy in 1891. He also served in the Sunday School presidency of his ward until his death. He died of a stroke and Bright’s disease in 1899 in Ogden at age forty-nine. His widow was forty-two years old at the time and was left with eleven children to rear. His daughter Dorothy recalled, “Father did not leave us any accumulated wealth but we have all felt proud to belong to him. His untiring efforts and devotion to his church affairs, his loyalty to the Scandinavian people and the lovable characteristics made him a favorite in the community and endeared him to his family. Yes, my Father left a clean record. His noble life was well spent” (Sherner, “Peter Lorenson Sherner,” 4–5).

His biographer gave additional insights into his character. He wrote that he was hasty and quick-tempered but was very repentant and forgiving. He recalled that Peter had been a gifted actor, taking leading roles in plays in the opera house in Ogden. It was said that he could speak and understand seven languages (see Sherner, “Peter Lorenson Sherner,” 5).


Anthon Lorentzen Skanchy

(Anthon Ellingsen Skanke)

1839–1914

Residence: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 20 December 1879

Missionary labors: Christiania Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 29 August 1881

Departure ship: Pacific

Birth date: 17 September 1839

Birthplace: Weibyeplads, Lade, Sør Trøndelag, Norway

Father: Skanke, Elling Lorentzen

Mother: Olsdatter, Jocummine

Spouse: Jacobsen, Anna Christine

Marriage date: 1868

Spouse: Flygare, Caroline

Marriage date: 10 October 1872

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Langaard, Sigrid

Marriage date: 25 November 1885

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Bergh, Caroline

Death date: 19 April 1914

Death place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Burial place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Anthon was working as an apprentice in a rope factory when he first heard the restored gospel preached. On 16 January 1861, he joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Soon after his baptism by Thomas Tønnesen, he was ordained an elder and called to “assist . . . in the ministry.” He traveled from island to island, preached a great deal, and baptized quite a number of people. He was arrested seven times and was sentenced three times to imprisonment on water and bread for administering the ordinances of the gospel, which was contrary to the laws of Norway. He wrote, “I visited nearly all the inhabited islands, fjords, and sands in Norland” (Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:422).

In 1866, after seven years of missionary service, he was called to preside over the Christiania Branch. In spring 1868, he was released as president and encouraged to emigrate. He journeyed to America aboard the John Bright. He crossed the plains with the Horton D. Haight company and settled in Logan, Cache County, Utah. In that community, he was ordained a high priest and was called to serve on the high council in the Cache Stake (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:422). While serving in this capacity, he supported his family by working on the railroad, cutting timber, and building on the Logan Temple (see Bitton, Guide to Mormon Diaries, 315).

In 1879, Anthon accepted a mission call to Norway. He arrived in Copenhagen on 20 December 1879 and was assigned to labor in the Christiania Conference. He served as president of the Trondhjem Branch before departing from Copenhagen on 29 August 1881 aboard the steamer Pacific (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 215; Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 238, 240, 258).

From 1881 to 1886, Anthon served as bishop of the Logan Sixth Ward (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:422). He interrupted this service to accept a second mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 2 November 1886 and was assigned to preside over the Christiania Conference. After fulfilling this mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 17 October 1889 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 299–300, 310).

He returned to Logan to face difficult days. Anthon was sentenced to four months in prison and fined one hundred dollars for unlawful cohabitation (see Jenson, Church Chronology, 7 December 1889). When the prison term ended, he was again called to Scandinavia. On 22 April 1901, he arrived in Copenhagen and was assigned to be president of the Scandinavian Mission. During his presidency, he served as the architect of the mission home and a local meeting hall. He departed from Copenhagen on 6 December 1904 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 385–86, 389, 402).

Upon returning to Logan, he resumed his position as bishop of the Logan Sixth Ward (see Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, 1162). He died in 1914 in Logan at age seventy-five from Bright’s disease.


Niels Christian Skougaard

1826–1902

Residence: Koosharem, Sevier Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 12 September 1882

Missionary labors: Christiania Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 9 June 1884

Departure ship: Milo

Birth date: 19 June 1826

Birthplace: Nyebraatten, Høland, Akershus, Norway

Father: Skougaard, Lorentz Severin

Mother: Olsdatter, Mari

Spouse: Hansen, Christine

Marriage date: 27 December 1852

Marriage place: Christiania, Christiania, Norway

Death date: 13 June 1902

Death place: Koosharem, Sevier Co., Utah

On 12 June 1857, Niels was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (see Skougaard, “A Diary of My Mission in Norway, 1882,” 1). He was living in Koosharem, Sevier County, Utah, when he accepted a mission call to Norway. He arrived in Copenhagen on 12 September 1882 and was assigned to labor in the Christiania Conference (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 267, 269).

In his missionary journal, he wrote of his arrival in Norway: “I felt in my heart to thank God for his goodness to me and particularly his protective hand that had guided us safely over land and sea and brought me back to the land of my birth to preach the true gospel. Many queer thoughts and feelings ran through my mind as I again set foot on my native soil.” From Drammen, Buskerud, Norway, Niels wrote that “the Saints have the freedom they want and the authorities are on their side.” However, in Fredreckshaven, he wrote, “Three of the Elders had been jailed on bread and water for preaching the gospel.” As to members in these communities, Niels found that “there were a few who showed a spirit of antagonism whom we tried to put on the right track and a few had to be excommunicated” (Skougaard, “A Diary of My Mission in Norway, 1882,” 1–2).

On Church Island, a few people were interested in hearing the gospel message, but the local priest put a stop to preaching. “Later we tried Vaalen Sogen with the same results,” wrote Niels. Due to opposition, in October 1882, he went to Spydborg “to find a lawyer named Larson to see if he would bring before the Storting [Senate] the question of the same religious liberty for us as other sects enjoyed in the country. He wouldn’t undertake it but promised he would speak for our cause. He could see we were not being treated fair. Later, it was presented to the senate by an advocate of equal rights” (Skougaard, “A Diary of My Mission in Norway, 1882,” 1–3).

Despite his efforts to gain equal rights for the Saints, on 30 May 1884 Niels and Peter Olsen “were sentenced . . . by the Christiania municipal court to pay 40 kroner in fine and 25 kroner for costs of court for having performed the ordinance of baptism” (Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 277). The fine was paid, but Niels did not stop preaching. He baptized several people and witnessed many miracles before departing from Copenhagen on 9 June 1884 aboard the steamer Milo (see Skougaard, “A Diary of My Mission in Norway, 1882,” 1–3).

Niels died in 1902 in Koosharem at age seventy-five. One of his descendants wrote, “My mother knew Niels. He was a gentleman in the old-fashioned meaning of the word, kindly, cultured, very courteous” (correspondence from Frankie Callison, 26 July 1999).


Erastus Fairbanks Snow

1818–88

Residence: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 15 May 1873

Missionary labors: Malmö Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 27 June 1873

Departure ship: Pacific

Birth date: 9 November 1818

Birthplace: St. Johnsbury, Caledonia, Vermont

Father: Snow, Levi

Mother: Streeter, Lucina

Spouse: Beeman, Artimesia

Marriage date: 13 (3) December 1838

Marriage place: Far West, Caldwell Co., Missouri

Spouse: White, Minerva

Marriage date: 2 April 1844

Marriage place: Nauvoo, Hancock Co., Illinois

Spouse: Wing, Achsah

Marriage date: 30 January 1846

Marriage place: Nauvoo, Hancock Co., Illinois

Spouse: Wing, Louisa

Marriage date: 30 January 1846

Marriage place: Nauvoo, Hancock Co., Illinois

Spouse: Ashby, Elizabeth Rebecca

Marriage date: 19 December 1847

Marriage place: Winter Quarters, Douglas Co., Nebraska

Spouse: Spencer, Julia Josephine

Marriage date: 11 April 1856

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Farley, Mary Jane

Marriage date: 14 April 1866

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: McMenemcy, Ann

Marriage date: 15 October 1867

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Hansen, Anna (Ann)

Marriage date: 9 May 1870

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Earl, Margaret

Marriage date: 28 March 1877

Marriage place: St. George, Washington Co., Utah

Spouse: Beckstrom, Anna

Marriage date: about 1879

Spouse: Farley, Rebecca Abigail

Marriage date: 18 June 1880

Marriage place: St. George, Washington Co., Utah

Spouse: Porter, Frances

Marriage date: 1 February 1882

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Wells, Matilda

Marriage date: 16 November 1882

Marriage place: St. George, Washington Co., Utah

Spouse: Nielsen, Inger

Marriage date: 16 July 1884

Marriage place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Death date: 27 May 1888

Death place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Burial place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

In 1833, Erastus joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He began missionary work at a young age. According to his biographer, “Immediately after his baptism [3 February 1833], he commenced to search the scriptures diligently and soon became very desirous to preach. Consequently, he was ordained to the office of a Teacher, June 28, 1834. . . . Erastus met regularly with the Saints on Sundays and visited them in their houses. He also made several short missionary trips to the neighboring villages.” In 1834, he was ordained a priest by his brother William, “after which he extended his missionary labors into the States of New York and New Hampshire, holding meetings and baptizing quite a number. After being ordained an Elder . . . [in] 1835, he continued his mission with increased zeal in New Hampshire and Vermont” (Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:103–4).

In 1836, he was ordained a seventy and accepted a mission call to Pennsylvania. Although he met with much opposition on this mission, he continued proselyting until 1838. He then joined the Latter-day Saints in Missouri. There he defended them from mob violence and secured a change of venue for the prisoners in Liberty Jail (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Biography, 1:104–6).

From 1839 to 1846, Erastus resided among the Saints in Illinois. He experienced many hardships associated with living in the marshlands of the Mississippi until being forced to flee to the West. On the westward trek, Erastus was a member of the vanguard company (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Biography, 1:104–6).

In 1849, he was ordained an Apostle and sent on a mission to Denmark, “to open the door of the gospel to the Scandinavian people.” Soon after his arrival in Copenhagen, Elder Snow and other Latter-day Saint missionaries baptized members of a Reformed Baptist congregation. By September 1850, they had organized the first branch of the Church in Copenhagen. “Before the end of the year the work had taken deep root, not only in Copenhagen, but in the province of Jutland” (Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:112).

Under Elder Snow’s direction, the Book of Mormon was translated into Danish and was published in 1851. In that same year, a Danish hymnbook was also printed as was the Skandinaviens Stjerne. Although persecution raged, “the more severe the persecutions, the better the work flourished.” In 1851, the gospel was introduced in Norway, and Elder Snow held the first general conference in Scandinavia. He departed from Copenhagen on 4 March 1852 (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:112–14).

In 1853, he was called “to strengthen the settlements in Iron County.” The next year, he was called to preside over members residing in St. Louis County, Missouri. From Missouri, he supervised the westward migration of the Saints before returning to the Salt Lake Valley in September 1855. In 1861, he was sent to southern Utah to locate possible settlements for raising cotton. From that time until his death, he “devoted a great deal of his time to the interest of southern Utah, over which he presided spiritually for many years” (Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:114–15).

Erastus served as president of the Scandinavia Mission from 1850 to 1852. He arrived in Copenhagen on 11 June 1850 and departed on 4 March 1852. He visited this same mission in 1873, arriving in Copenhagen on 15 May 1873. After six weeks of visiting, he departed on 27 June 1873 (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:114–15).

When the Edmunds Law was enacted, Erastus went into exile “for conscience sake.” One biographer eulogized him as “an honest man, a true husband and a kind father, a wise counselor, an efficient pioneer and colonizer, a great statesman and, in every sense of the word, truly an Apostle of the Lord Jesus Christ” (Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:115). He died in 1888 at his home in Salt Lake City at age sixty-nine.


Gustave Walfred Söderberg

1835–1922

Residence: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 9 November 1891

Missionary labors: Århus Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 30 March 1893

Birth date: 13 October 1835

Birthplace: Ramlösa, Raus, Malmöhus, Sweden

Father: Söderberg, Olof Frederik

Mother: Loungren, Anna Marie

Spouse: Andersen, Johansene Frederike

Marriage date: 19 January 1869

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 26 March 1922

Death place: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

Burial place:Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

Gustav was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on 22 February 1865 by Elder L. Larsen. He immigrated to America on 20 June 1868.

While Gustav was residing in Ephraim, Sanpete County, Utah, he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1891. He arrived in Copenhagen on 9 November 1891 and was assigned to labor in the Århus Conference. At the close of an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 30 March 1893 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 320, 333).

He returned to Ephraim, where he died in 1922 at his home at age eighty-six. His funeral services were held in the Ephraim Tabernacle. Of him it was said, “He has always been an active and earnest Church worker” (“Gustave Söderberg,” Deseret News, 28 March 1922).


Louis Söderberg

(Lars Larsson)

1848–1911

Residence: Elsinore, Sevier Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 6 June 1892

Missionary labors: Stockholm Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 7 June 1894

Departure ship: Bravo

Birth date: 18 July 1848

Birthplace: Torp, Västernorrland, Sweden

Father: Larsson, Lars

Mother: Eriksdotter, Kristina Jorgensen

Spouse: Parker, Sigrid

Marriage date: 1875

Death date: 16 February 1911

Death place: Elsinore, Sevier Co., Utah

Burial place: Elsinore, Sevier Co., Utah

Louis immigrated to America in 1866 with his mother. On 17 August 1874, Louis was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints by P. Lundberg. He married Sigrid Parker in 1875, and his first daughter, Emma, was born in Minnesota. He eventually settled in Elsinore, Sevier County, Utah. Like many other pioneers, whose clothes had “patches on patches,” he lived in a house that had a dirt floor. His mother carpeted the floor with the matting from tea shipments (see Warnock, Our Own Sevier, 192; Jacobsen, Memories of Little Denmark, 76).

In adulthood, he was a “large man, above 210 pounds.” His size and strength enabled him to win a new axe at a “felling trees contest on the 4th of July in Elsinore.” Nearly a year after the contest, he was ordained a seventy on 30 June 1888 by H. O. Magleby (see Warnock, Our Own Sevier, 192).

Four years later, he accepted a mission call to Sweden. He arrived in Copenhagen on 6 June 1892 and was assigned to labor in the Stockholm Conference. After serving honorably for two years, he departed from Copenhagen on 7 June 1894 aboard the steamer Bravo (Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 328–29, 337).

Returning to Elsinore, he supported his family by farming. He served as the first presiding elder of the Brooklyn Branch in the Sevier Stake, succeeding Thomas E. Broadbent in 1897. He also served as superintendent of the YMMIA and as a Sunday School teacher. He was known for his knowledge of the Bible (see Jacobsen, Memories of Little Denmark, 35).

He served his community as town marshal and as town president from 1898 to 1902. He was ordained a high priest before his death from heart failure in 1911 in Elsinore at age sixty-two (see Jacobsen, Memories of Little Denmark, 57, 76).


Andreas Pontus Söderborg

1831–90

Residence: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 4 December 1871

Missionary labors: Stockholm Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 29 August 1873

Departure ship: Pacific

Birth date: 6 February 1831

Birthplace: Kristine-Göteborg, Göteborg Sweden

Father: Söderborg, Carl Fredrik

Mother: Österman, Anna Margreta

Spouse: Johnson, Augusta Carolina

Marriage date: 17 November 1866

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Curren, Mary

Death date: 12 July 1890

Death place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Burial place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Andreas was adopted by his childless uncle, John Anders. Uncle John was wealthy and gave him the best education available at that time. However, because of a law that required young men to learn a trade, Andreas went to sea as an apprentice to learn “both theoretical and practical navigation.” He made long voyages to the East Indies, Australia, and Africa, with the hope of becoming a captain of his own ship. This hope ended when it was discovered that the sea impaired his vision. He left the sea to attend college in Göteborg, Sweden. There he learned five languages before going to England to learn the cabinetmaking trade (see Carlson, “A Biography of My Father and Mother,” 1).

While in England, Andreas met Latter-day Saint missionaries. “He read the Book of Mormon through three times, after which he applied for baptism.” He was baptized on 2 July 1860 by John Van Cott. He next met a young woman whom he wanted to marry. She opposed his new religion because of polygamy. When she gave him a choice between the Church and marrying her, he told her that “he was really converted and must always be true to that conviction” (Carlson, “A Biography of My Father and Mother,” 2).

When he had finished his apprenticeship in England, Andreas returned to Sweden and tried to convert his uncle and other family members. They “were very bitter because he had joined this unpopular religion; . . . they said they could have forgiven anything else he might have done, but not this, they were humiliated beyond expression” (Carlson, “A Biography of My Father and Mother,” 2). They too gave him a choice between his faith and his family. Andreas again chose his faith.

He became a traveling elder and later president of the Göteborg Conference. In 1864, he immigrated to America and settled in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah. When he had been in Utah only a few weeks, he walked forty miles to see Augusta Johnson, a young woman he had met on his mission. They were married a few years later. He supported his wife and family as a railroad worker, engineer, and cabinetmaker (see Carlson, “A Biography of My Father and Mother,” 2–3).

In 1871, Andreas accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 4 December 1871 and was assigned to labor in the Stockholm Conference (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 223). He served as president of the Jönköping Branch. At the end of this mission, he visited his uncle. Uncle John was glad to see him but insisted that he should bring his family back to Sweden to live, give up the Church, and receive his inheritance. Andreas could not comply with his wishes. The uncle then gave his inheritance to charity (see Carlson, “A Biography of My Father and Mother,” 4). Andreas departed from Copenhagen on 29 August 1873 aboard the steamer Pacific (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 215, 217). He died in 1890 in Salt Lake City at age fifty-nine (see Carlson, “A Biography of My Father and Mother,” 4).


Carl Edward Soderlund

(Carl Eduard Söderlund)

1841–1934

Residence: East Mill Creek, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 30 April 1889

Missionary labors: Stockholm Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 28 May 1891

Departure ship: Cameo

Birth date: 14 July 1841

Birthplace: St. Jakob-Stockholm, Stockholm, Sweden

Father: Mattesson Söderlund, Lars

Mother: Larsdotter, Ingrid Maria

Spouse: Mikkelsen, Caroline Amelia (Emeline)

Marriage date: 26 December 1878

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: McLaughlin, Hanna Chadwick

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 7 February 1934

Death place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Carl was baptized in Sweden and immigrated to America in 1860 and settled in Utah in 1873. As was the custom, he was rebaptized on 21 June 1877 in the Salt Lake Valley. While a resident of East Mill Creek, Salt Lake County, he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1889. He arrived in Copenhagen on 30 April 1889 and was assigned to labor in the Stockholm Conference. After completing an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 28 May 1891 aboard the steamer Cameo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 373–74).

Returning to Utah, he engaged in farming in Mill Creek. He died at his home in 1934 of infirmities incident to age. He was age eighty-two (see “Carl Söderlund,” Salt Lake Tribune, 9 February 1934).


Ole Christian Nielsen Sonne

(Ole Christian Nielsen)

1822–1900

Residence: Mendon, Cache Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 19 August 1879

Missionary labors: Ålborg Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 28 August 1880

Departure ship: Otto

Birth date: 1 February 1822

Birthplace: Klitgård, Nørholm, Ålborg, Denmark

Father: Sonne, Niels Olsen

Mother: Christensdatter, Karen

Spouse: Hvilsom, Katherine Cecilia

Marriage date: 16 July 1854

Marriage place: Trinitatis, Copenhagen, Denmark

Spouse: Sorensen, Maren

Marriage date: 1 August 1860

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 21 September 1900

Death place: Mendon, Cache Co., Utah

Ole was baptized on 2 April 1856. After his baptism, Ole served a local mission in the Ålborg Conference from December 1856 to February 1858. On 21 February 1858, he departed from Denmark bound for America (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 129–30).

Ole was living in Mendon, Cache County, Utah, when he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1879. He arrived in Copenhagen on 19 August 1879 and was assigned to labor in the Ålborg Conference. At the close of an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 28 August 1880 aboard the steamer Otto (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 238–39, 244). He returned to Utah, where he was sentenced to three months in prison for “fornication” in 1895 (see Jenson, Church Chronology, 24 May 1895). Ole died in 1900 in Mendon at age seventy-eight.


Charles Sorensen

(Carl Basse Marius Pedersen)

1860–1929

Residence: Hyrum, Cache Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 13 December 1892

Missionary labors: Copenhagen and Skåne conferences

Departure date from Copenhagen: 8 November 1894

Departure ship: Rona

Birth date: 25 March 1860

Birthplace: Vor Fure-Odense, Odense, Denmark

Father: Olsen, Peder

Mother: Larsdatter, Bodil Kirstine

Spouse: Unsworth, Alice

Marriage date: 17 September 1881

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 2 July 1929

Death place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Burial place: Hyrum, Cache Co., Utah

When Charles was a child, his mother joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. In 1866, she attempted to immigrate to America with Charles and his brother. The first time she boarded ship, her husband came aboard and pulled her and the children off. The second time, she hid her sons in barrels (see Larsen, “Autobiography of Bodil Larsen,” 1).

After arriving in America, Charles lived for a year in Brigham City, Box Elder County, Utah, before moving to Hyrum, Cache County, Utah. In that small community, he grew to manhood working as a farmer and stock raiser. Later he worked on the railroad and sold real estate (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 329).

In 1892, he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 13 December 1892 and was assigned to labor in the Copenhagen Conference. In 1894, he served as president of the Skåne Conference. While on this mission, he visited his mother’s brothers and their families, who were happy to see him. However, the mission president told Charles not to speak to his father because he was a “Mormon hater.” Charles “actually saw his blood father peddling vegetables on the street but did not approach him” (Larsen, “Autobiography of Bodil Larsen,” 1). After completing an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 8 November 1894. He crossed the Atlantic aboard the steamer Rona (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 328–29, 337, 485).

Returning to Hyrum, Charles was active in both Church and civic affairs. He served as a YMMIA officer, ward Sunday School superintendent, and twice as a stake missionary. He also served on the Hyrum city council (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 329). Charles died in 1929 in Salt Lake City at age sixty-nine.


Frederik Isaac Sorensen

(Frederik Isak Nicolaisen)

1840–1922

Residence: Mendon, Cache Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 29 November 1879

Missionary labors: Copenhagen Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 20 June 1881

Departure ship: Cato (Hero)

Birth date: 24 February 1840

Birthplace: Haugerup, Pedersborg, Sorø, Denmark

Father: Sørensen, Nicolai

Mother: Olsen, Magdalena (Malene)

Spouse: Poulsen, Mary Jacobsen

Marriage date: 15 November 1869

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 7 November 1922

Death place: Mendon, Cache Co., Utah

Burial place: Mendon, Cache Co., Utah

In 1857, Frederik and his family joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and immigrated to America. They crossed the plains with the Captain Cowley company. They settled in Mill Creek, Salt Lake County, Utah, before relocating in Mendon, Cache County (see correspondence from Marie H. Hawkins, 2 August 1999). In 1862, Frederik drove an ox team to Florence, Douglas County, Nebraska, hoping to help immigrants reach the Salt Lake Valley. After assisting immigrants, he returned to Mendon and joined the United Order. He served in the “home militia” and “took part in the Echo Canyon trouble” (Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, 1176).

In 1870, he heard Bishop Henry Hughes offer ten acres of the best land in the settlement to a chorister that would attend meetings regularly. Frederik accepted his offer and served as the choir leader of Mendon for fifty-six years. During that service, he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia (see Carter, Our Pioneer Heritage, 15:494). He arrived in Copenhagen on 29 November 1879 and was assigned to labor in the Copenhagen Conference. After completing an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 20 June 1881 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 255).

Returning to Mendon, Frederik was “active in [the] church and community. He wrote songs and plays and sometimes sang and acted in them, and . . . played a fiddle for Church dances” (correspondence from Marie H. Hawkins, 2 August 1999). He also opened his home to General Authorities. He served as a Sunday School superintendent for forty years (see Richards, “Hill Family History,” 260). He was a city councilman and a school trustee for twelve years (see Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, 1176). He died in 1922 in Mendon at age eighty-two.


Hans Christian Sorensen

(Hans Christian Madsen)

1864–1925

Residence: Orderville, Kane Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 24 June 1887

Missionary labors: Ålborg Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 8 August 1889

Departure ship: Bravo

Birth date: 30 November 1864

Birthplace: Døstrup, Ålborg, Denmark

Father: Sørensen, Mads

Mother: Kristensdatter, Kirsten

Spouse: Esplin, Marinda

Marriage date: 18 March 1890

Marriage place: St. George, Washington Co., Utah

Death date: 3 April 1925

Death place: Mount Carmel, Kane Co., Utah

Burial place: Orderville, Kane Co., Utah

Hans’s parents joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Denmark. After their baptism, they sent Hans and three of his siblings aboard the Wyoming across the Atlantic in the care of their Uncle Anders. In September 1873, the children and uncle were residing in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 3:718).

From the city, Hans moved to Fillmore, Millard County, Utah, and then to Holden, Millard County, where he attended school. By 1874, his parents had immigrated to America and settled in Mill Creek, Salt Lake County. His father had missed Hans so much that he walked 125 miles to Holden to bring him home (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 3:718).

In 1875, the family moved from Mill Creek to Orderville, Kane County, where they participated in the United Order. His mother became a temple worker in the St. George Temple. For Hans to help her in this work, he was ordained an elder at age fifteen by permission of President Wilford Woodruff (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 3:718).

In 1887, Hans received a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 24 June 1887 and was assigned to labor in the Ålborg Conference. At the time, he was the youngest elder in the conference. He served faithfully for two years before departing from Copenhagen on 8 August 1889 aboard the steamer Bravo. Aboard ship were seven young emigrants whom he was bringing home to live with his parents (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 304–5, 309; Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 3:718).

The day after he returned to Orderville, Hans was ordained a high priest and called to be an alternate high councilman in the Kanab Stake. Less than one year later, he married Marinda Esplin and moved to Mount Carmel, Kane County, Utah. In that small community, he served as Sunday School superintendent for several years before becoming bishop of the Mount Carmel Ward in 1900. He supported his family as a farmer and stockman until his death in 1925 in Mount Carmel at age sixty (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 3:718).


John Peter Sorensen

(Jørgen Peter Sørensen)

1837–1909

Residence: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 14 June 1887

Missionary labors: Århus Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 30 May 1889

Departure ship: Milo

Birth date: 17 October 1837

Birthplace: Vestermark, Ulkebøl, Åbenrå-Sønderborg, Denmark

Father: Sørensen, Peter Emil

Mother: Jeppesdatter, Anna Marie

Spouse: Gyllenskog, Eva

Marriage date: 24 December 1872

Spouse: Monson, Oliva

Marriage date: 1882

Spouse: Samuelson, Alma Charlotte

Marriage date: 1883

Spouse: Reinholtz, Christine

Spouse: Jacobsen, Caroline

Spouse: Detefs, Marina

Death date: 20 December 1909

Death place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

John became a ship’s carpenter at age nineteen. He traveled to many countries, including Iceland, Russia, and Italy, before being shipwrecked in the English Channel in 1859. He worked in the gold mines of Australia and New Zealand for nine years before locating in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah, in 1871. At that time, he wasn’t interested in religion. He found fulfillment in the Freemasons, the Odd Fellows, and the Knights of Pythias (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:819).

John was “considered a man of the world” by his friends. But in 1878, he had a dream in which he saw one of his children destroyed. According to John’s account, the same night he passed into a trance, during which his spirit left his body, and he beheld the punishment of the wicked. At the time of this dream, his children were “all well, . . . 36 hours later his eldest child was a corpse, in fulfillment of his dream.” For the next three months, he had “open visions and spiritual manifestations almost daily. He consulted Catholic priests and others, and fasted and prayed for relief; but none came.” After going from church to church, he attended the local Latter-day Saint ward, “where his spiritual hearing was opened, and he heard the angels of God in voices of praise and rejoicing, when he entered the hall.” Soon after this experience, he asked to be baptized. He was baptized on 1 April 1879 by William W. Taylor (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:819–20).

After his baptism, he immigrated to America. He resided in Salt Lake City, where he was ordained an elder and a seventy in October 1879. He accepted a mission call to New Zealand. In Auckland, New Zealand, he “was very unkindly received by the inhabitants.” One of his missionary companions became ill and went “further south; and another became discouraged and returned to Utah.” This made John the only missionary in New Zealand, with four converts, “in the midst of a very hostile community. He was mobbed repeatedly and suffered personal violence.” On 19 July 1881, he was honorably released after baptizing forty converts and organizing three branches (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:820).

Returning to Utah, he entered the furniture business. He sold furniture until a fire destroyed the business. In 1886, he was arrested and charged with polygamy but was released due to lack of evidence (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:820).

Less than a year later, he was called on a mission to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 14 June 1887 and was assigned to labor in the Århus Conference. He was “expelled from Als, his native island” and was “hunted like a criminal for the gospel’s sake, on the island of Fyen but he was successful in his missionary labor.” He departed from Copenhagen on 30 May 1889 aboard the steamer Milo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 304, 309; Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:819–20).

After returning to Utah, he “opened a farm” in West Jordan and built a house in the Salt Lake 21st Ward. On 27 February 1893, he was ordained a high priest. He served in a number of civic positions, including appraiser of school lands, “commissioner to locate a State experiment farm in southern Utah, and county fruit tree inspector.” He reopened his furniture business, which prospered until 1894. Biographer Andrew Jenson said that he was “a zealous Latter-day Saint, persevering in whatever he undertakes to do” (Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:819–20). John died in 1909 in Salt Lake City at age seventy-two.


Mads Peter Sorensen

(Mads Peter Sørensen)

1836–1920

Residence: Mayfield, Sanpete Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 28 October 1890

Missionary labors: Århus Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 31 March 1892

Birth date: 5 February 1836

Birthplace: Honum, Hvirring, Skanderborg, Denmark

Father: Johansen, Soren

Mother: Jensdatter, Ane Maria

Spouse: Olsen, Elsie

Marriage date: 6 July 1863

Marriage place: Florence, Douglas Co., Nebraska

Death date: 25 March 1920

Death place: Mayfield, Sanpete Co., Utah

Burial place: Mayfield, Sanpete Co., Utah

From age nine, Mads had to earn his own food and lived “among strangers.” On 2 October 1857, he was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints by H. P. Olsen. In 1858, he was ordained a priest and called to preside over the Horsens Branch until July 1858, when he was assigned to serve in the Hviels Branch. In April 1859, he was arrested for preaching false doctrine. After fighting the charge in court for three months, he was convicted and fined sixteen dollars “for preaching false doctrine and distributing tracts” (Sorensen, “Autobiographical Sketch of Mads Peter Sorensen,” 1). Because he didn’t have the money to pay the fine, he served a jail sentence—living on bread and water. After his release, he became the presiding elder of the Kolding District (Vejle County) until immigrating to America in April 1863.

Mads crossed the plains in the Captain John T. Saunders company to reach the Salt Lake Valley. He settled in Manti, Sanpete County, Utah, where he served as a home guard in the Black Hawk War. He then moved to Gunnison, Sanpete County, and from there to Mayfield, Sanpete County, in 1873 (see Sorensen, “Autobiographical Sketch of Mads Peter Sorensen”). He became the first constable of Mayfield (see History of Sanpete and Emery Counties, Utah, 542). In that community, he was also a farmer and a road supervisor (see correspondence from Shirley A. Giles, 26 July 1999).

Mads interrupted these occupations in 1890 to accept a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 28 October 1890 and was assigned to labor in the Århus Conference (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 316–17). He served in the “Århus, Horsens, Grinnae (Grenå) Branches” until being released due to illness on 31 March 1892 (see Sorensen, “Autobiographical Sketch of Mads Peter Sorensen,” 1).

After returning to Utah, he served on the Mayfield School Board, held stock in the Mayfield-Gunnison Co-op and Flour Mill, and was a “prominent and representative citizen” (History of Sanpete and Emery Counties, Utah, 542). He died in 1920 in Mayfield at age eighty-four.


Ole Sorensen Jr.

1864–1954

Residence: Fountain Green, Sanpete Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 1 November 1891

Missionary labors: Copenhagen and Christiania conferences

Departure date from Copenhagen: 7 September 1893

Departure ship: Bravo

Birth date: 12 April 1864

Birthplace: Fountain Green, Sanpete Co., Utah

Father: Sørensen, Ole

Mother: Hansdatter, Catherine Caroline

Spouse: Anderson, Anna Christina

Marriage date: 21 August 1885

Spouse: Gould, Mary Ann

Marriage date: 11 July 1888

Spouse: Sherman, Martha

Marriage date: 7 January 1946

Death date: 20 November 1954

Burial place: Fountain Green, Sanpete Co., Utah

In 1891, Ole accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 1 November 1891 and was assigned to labor in the Copenhagen Conference (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 320–21). After laboring on the islands of Falster, Maribo County, and Moen, Præstø County, he and his companion were banished from Denmark for preaching the gospel of Jesus Christ (see Jenson, Church Chronology, March 1892). Lutheran priests, alarmed at their success in “holding a number of meetings and baptizing several persons,” asked police to classify the missionaries as “dangerous foreigners with false and misleading doctrines” (Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 325).

Their request was granted. Ole and his companion were “brought before the authorities, who gave them two weeks to get out of the country” (Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 325). During those weeks, they were mobbed and threatened. They escaped with the help of friends but not without injury. However, before their escape they bore testimony to those disgusted with the actions of the mob.

Ole then served in the Christiania Conference. In June 1893, he “held an open air meeting in Guldbransdalen in which [he and his companion] preached to 300 people.” At the close of this mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 7 September 1893 aboard the steamer Bravo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 321, 323, 325). He returned to Fountain Green, where he died in 1954 at age ninety.


Ole Sorensen Sr.

1836–1908

Residence: Fountain Green, Sanpete Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 5 June 1883

Missionary labors: Århus Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 15 June 1885

Departure ship: Panther

Birth date: 7 April 1836

Birthplace: Åby, Århus, Denmark

Father: Jespersen, Soren

Mother: Olesdatter, Frederika

Spouse: Hansen, Catherine Caroline

Marriage date: 31 May 1863

Marriage place: Fountain Green, Sanpete Co., Utah

Spouse: Larsen, Nicolina

Marriage date: 24 June 1891

Death date: 27 April 1908

Death place: Fountain Green, Sanpete Co., Utah

Burial place: Fountain Green, Sanpete Co., Utah

At age sixteen, Ole began learning the miller’s trade. His apprenticeship was interrupted when he accepted baptism into The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on 7 April 1860. The next two years, he served as a traveling elder and as president of the Århus Branch. In 1862, he immigrated to America and crossed the plains in Bishop Madsen’s ox train company to reach Salt Lake City on 27 September 1862 (see History of Sanpete and Emery Counties, Utah, 534–35).

For several years, Ole resided in Fountain Green, Sanpete County. In that community, he operated a “burr mill” and made furniture. He also became part owner of the Phoenix Flour Mill and a commissioned second in the Black Hawk War (see History of Sanpete and Emery Counties, Utah, 534–35).

In 1883, he left his prosperous circumstances and military commission to accept a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 5 June 1883 and was assigned to labor in the Århus Conference. After completing an honorable mission, in which he served as president of the Århus Conference, he departed from Copenhagen on 15 June 1885 aboard the steamer Panther (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 273, 275, 290, 498).

Returning to Fountain Green, Ole served as a home missionary and elders quorum president in the Sanpete Stake. He died in 1908 in Fountain Green at age seventy-two (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:523).


< lang="ES">Rasmus Sorensen

< lang="ES">(Rasmus Sørensen)

< lang="ES">1831–1907

< lang="ES">

< lang="ES">Residence:< lang="ES"> Levan, Juab Co.< lang="ES">, Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 2 May 1890

Missionary labors: Århus Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 1 October 1891

Departure ship: Guion Lines

Birth date: 29 May 1831

Birthplace: Rye, Skanderborg, Denmark

Father: Rasmussen, Søren

Mother: Rasmusdatter, Kirsten

Spouse: Larsen, Ane Marie

Marriage date: 26 September 1857

Marriage place: Grædstrup, Skanderborg, Denmark

Spouse: Jensen, Mariane (Mirah)

Death date: 18 December 1907

Death place: Levan, Juab Co., Utah

Burial place: Levan, Juab Co., Utah

Before his baptism, Rasmus learned the trades of a fisherman and cobbler. On 16 May 1866, he was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. His wife Ane was baptized in September 1866. Ane’s parents were opposed to the new faith and insisted that their daughter and Rasmus, who were living in a house that her mother owned, move. Rasmus and his wife decided to immigrate to America with their four children in 1873. Unfortunately, their twelve-year-old son, Søren, who had been whipped by his father, ran away and hid on the day their ship sailed from Copenhagen (see “Rasmus Sorenson, 1831–1907,” 1).

The voyage aboard the Wisconsin, which usually took fifty days, was delayed another fifty-six days because the ship was blown off course by high winds. When it docked in New York Harbor, Rasmus and his family were half-starved and weak because their rations had run out (see “Rasmus Sorenson, 1831–1907,” 1).

The family settled in Levan, Juab County, Utah. Soon after their arrival, Ane died. Rasmus was left to raise five young children between thirteen years old and a few months. Unable to care for them and work at the same time, he gave the baby up for adoption and sent the other children to work for neighboring families (see “Rasmus Sorenson, 1831–1907,” 1).

Rasmus worked as a cobbler. He prospered and in a few years acquired nine acres of sheep pasture. He had sixty-three sheep and as he grew older insisted that every day the sheep be counted. He was hardworking and frugal, even with the use of water. “When water shortages came and most farmers lost their stock, he carried water in barrels to save his [stock]” (“Rasmus Sorenson, 1831–1907,” 1). He was elected water master of Levan.

In 1890, Rasmus accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 2 May 1890 and was assigned to labor in the Århus Conference. He served as president of the Horsens Branch and as president of the Esbjerg Branch (Ribe County) (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 226). After completing an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 1 October 1891 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 16–17, 319).

He returned to Levan, where he profited by creating a campground on his property that fronted a much-used highway. He played the accordion and harmonica, to the delight of his family, neighbors, and travelers staying in the campground. Shortly before his death in 1907, Rasmus learned that his son Søren was residing in Australia. His biographer characterized Rasmus as “a small man, slightly over 5 feet high and weighing about 120 lbs., he was neither affectionate nor patient yet when he spoke his voice commanded attention” (“Rasmus Sorenson, 1831–1907,” 1).


Soren Sorensen

(Søren Sørensen)

1845–1930

Residence: Elsinore, Sevier Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 6 November 1882

Missionary labors: Ålborg Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 25 August 1884

Departure ship: Panther

Birth date: 10 September 1845

Birthplace: Degnbøls Mark, Mygdal, Hjørring, Denmark

Father: Sørensen, Søren Christian

Mother: Hansdatter, Marie

Spouse: Nielsen, Anna Marie

Marriage date: 17 October 1867

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Nielsen, Ane

Marriage date: 11 April 1876

Death date: 13 September 1930

Death place: Elsinore, Sevier Co., Utah

Burial place: Elsinore, Sevier Co., Utah

On 1 March 1864, Soren joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. After his baptism, he served as a local missionary for two years before immigrating to America. He arrived in Salt Lake City in October 1867 (see Sorenson, “The History of Soren Sorenson,” 1).

By 1868, he had moved to Pleasant Grove, Utah County, and by fall 1869 was residing in Levan, Juab County. In 1877, he moved to Elsinore, Sevier County, where he was involved in “farming, milling, merchandising, and freighting with a four horse team.” Like fellow pioneers, he and his wife “went through the trials and hardships . . . without wavering, always holding fast to the ideals and principles of the gospel. They were ‘thrifty’ and ‘hard working,’ . . . giving their best to the Church and community in which they lived” (Sorenson, “The History of Soren Sorenson,” 1).

In 1882, Soren accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 6 November 1882 and was assigned to labor in the Ålborg Conference (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 266). On 2 January 1883, he and Jens Frost attempted to aid fellow missionaries incarcerated by government authorities at Thisted. They asked permission to attend the trial, but were refused. They were then interrogated by the police:

[Question] Are you Mormons?

[Answer] Yes, we believe in the doctrines of the Latter-day Saints.

[Q.] Where are you from?

[A.] America.

[Q.] What are you doing here?

[A.] We visit our friends.

[Q.] What are you preaching?

[A.] The doctrines of Jesus Christ.

[Q.] Where do you hold your meetings?

[A.] Anywhere.

[Q.] But we suppose you do not hold any here?

[A.] Yes, if we get an opportunity to do so.

[Remark] Then you shall be honored with our supervision.

[A.] Thank you, we shall be pleased for you to honor us with your presence.

The police asked other “unnecessary questions,” but when Soren and his companion asked “what paragraph of the law they had broken,” a policeman became angry and ordered them to “shut up” and to leave the police quarters immediately. They followed the directive. Soren departed from Copenhagen on 25 August 1884 aboard the steamer Panther (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 266–67, 279).

After returning to Elsinore, he served as a member of the high council in the Sevier Stake. To support himself and his family, he worked as a farmer and miller. He also operated a co-op store and invested in mining. After retiring from these enterprises, he spent much of his time reading the scriptures. Soren died in 1930 in Elsinore at age eighty-five (see Sorenson, “The History of Soren Sorenson,” 1–2).


Soren Christian Sorensen

(Søren Christian Madsen)

< lang="ES">1859–1948

< lang="ES">

< lang="ES">Residence:< lang="ES"> Mesa, Maricopa Co., Arizona

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 19 September 1891

Missionary labors: Århus Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 10 August 1893

Departure ship: Milo

Birth date: 16 February 1859

Birthplace: Bjørkeshøj, Vive, Ålborg, Denmark

Father: Sørensen, Mads

Mother: Christensdatter, Kirsten

Spouse: Robson, Mary Elizabeth

Marriage date: 29 (28) December 1885

Spouse: MacDonald, Margaret Atkinson

Marriage date: 10 May 1894

Marriage place: Mesa, Maricopa Co., Arizona

Death date: 10 December 1948

< lang="ES">Death place:< lang="ES"> Mesa, Maricopa Co., Arizona

< lang="ES">Burial place:< lang="ES"> Mesa, Maricopa Co., Arizona

< lang="ES">

One day when Soren was ice skating, the ice broke, and he “went under. Mother heard him scream . . . [and] ran out to help him.” She saw a man laughing as he watched the accident. She scolded him for not helping. He replied, “He is only a Mormon.” A week later that man died. Soren said that he “saw a light under the ice and followed it and got out safe” (Clement, “Families of Destiny,” 26).

In 1873, he immigrated to America with his Uncle Andrew and his siblings. His parents and two younger sisters remained in Denmark until 1874 before they also emigrated (see Clement, “Families of Destiny,” 28–29).

Soren settled in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah. He worked in the East Fork Canyon and in the city before being hired “to help drive the stock and horses” of families called to settle in Arizona. “I am going to Arizona to make more dollars and will come back,” he said. He didn’t return, however. He resided in Arizona for the next fifty years, most of that time in Mesa and Phoenix in Mariposa County (see “Life History of Kirsten Marie Sorensen Jensen,” 5; Clement, “Families of Destiny,” 32).

In 1891, he left Arizona to fulfill a mission to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 19 September 1891. Upon arrival, he took “his hat off and [thanked] the Lord for helping all his family come to America.” He was assigned to labor in the Århus Conference. Of his labors, he wrote, “Many people . . . looked down on us for being Mormons but . . . liked to hear about America. The people . . . were too well satisfied with their life as it was and were not interested in the gospel” (“Life History of Kirsten Marie Sorensen Jensen,” 5). He departed from Copenhagen on 10 August 1893 aboard the steamer Milo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 320, 332, 339–40).

After his mission, Soren served as bishop of the Lehi Ward in Arizona. He is remembered for donating land to the Church on which the Mesa Temple was built. Soren died in 1948 in Mesa at age eighty-nine (see “Life History of Kirsten Marie Sorensen Jensen,” 5; Clement, “Families of Destiny,” 26).


Peter Hansen Sorenson

(Peder Hansen)

1856–1926

Residence: Brigham City, Box Elder Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 28 September 1890

Missionary labors: Århus Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 4 August 1892

Birth date: 30 June 1856

Birthplace: Trælløse, Skelby, Præstø, Denmark

Father: Sorensen, Hans

Mother: Mortensdatter, Ane Marie

Spouse: Godtfredsen, Ida Eliza

Marriage date: 11 November 1879

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Petersen, Anne Christine

Marriage date: 13 December 1888

Marriage place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Death date: 13 February 1926

Death place: Brigham City, Box Elder Co., Utah

Burial place: Brigham City, Box Elder Co., Utah

At age seventeen, Peter was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on 27 March 1872. He immigrated with his parents and three brothers to America. They settled in Brigham City, Box Elder County, Utah. While residing in that community, Peter accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1890. He was set apart for the mission by Lorenzo Snow. He arrived in Copenhagen on 28 September 1890 and was assigned to labor in the Århus Conference. He kept a small daybook of his missionary travels. After serving an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 4 August 1892 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 316–17, 326).

He returned to Brigham City, where he served in the Fifty-eighth Quorum of the Seventy until being called on another mission to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 11 February 1912 and was assigned to labor as president of the Copenhagen Conference. He served in this capacity until 1914 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 435, 499).

He returned to Brigham City, where he served in the presidency of the Scandinavian Organization of the Box Elder Stake and as president of the organization for ten years. He served for four years as superintendent of the waterworks for the city, a court bailiff, and judge of elections. He was a painter and paperhanger by trade, and also worked in horticulture and agriculture (see “Peter Sorenson,” Deseret News, 15 February 1926).

He died in the Dee Hospital in 1926 at Ogden, Weber County, following a kidney illness of several months. He was sixty-nine. His funeral was held in the Brigham City Fifth Ward meetinghouse (see “Peter Sorenson,” Deseret News, 15 February 1926).


Thomas Spongberg

1873–1936

Residence: Preston, Franklin Co., Idaho

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 15 March 1892

Missionary labors: Stockholm Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 7 June 1894

Departure ship: Bravo

Birth date: 14 October 1873 (1875)

Birthplace: Franklin, Franklin Co., Idaho

Father: Spongberg, Charles Johan

Mother: Funk, Jacobina

Spouse: Sutherland, Grace Geddes

Marriage date: 17 March 1910

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 12 August 1936

Death place: Preston, Franklin Co., Idaho

Burial place: Preston City Cemetery, Preston, Franklin Co., Idaho

Thomas, a resident of Preston, Franklin County, Idaho, accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1892. He arrived in Copenhagen on 15 March 1892 and was assigned to labor in the Stockholm Conference. At the close of an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 7 June 1894 aboard the steamer Bravo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 327, 329, 337).

Family tradition suggests that he served a second mission to Sweden in 1905. Historical evidence suggests that he returned to Preston after the first mission and worked as a mail carrier on a rural route for eighteen years. It also suggests that during a period of ten years he taught school at Cowley, Big Horn, Wyoming; Hinckley, Millard County, and Richmond, Cache County, Utah; Mink Creek, Franklin County, and Preston, Oneida County, Idaho. Ecclesiastically, he was a high priest and a member of the Franklin Stake Sunday School Board. He died suddenly in 1936 of a heart attack in the post office in Preston at age sixty-two (see “Thomas Spongberg,” Salt Lake Tribune, 13 August 1936).


Anders Persson Stenblom

(Anders Persson)

1835–1910

Residence: Hunter, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 2 February 1893

Missionary labors: Stockholm Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 16 November 1893

Birth date: 2 April 1835

Birthplace: Granbäck, Gillberga, Värmland, Sweden

Father: Olsson, Per

Mother: Jönsdotter, Stina

Spouse: Heshmant, Charlotte

Marriage date: 25 July 1878

Spouse: Anderson, Anna Sofia

Marriage date: 25 July 1878

Spouse: MacPhearson, Albertine Josephine

Death date: 17 February 1910

Death place: Hunter, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Burial place: Hunter, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Anders was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on 28 February 1864 in Stockholm, Sweden. He was a faithful member of that branch until he emigrated on 19 June 1875.

Anders was a resident of Hunter, Salt Lake County, Utah, when he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1893. He arrived in Copenhagen on 2 February 1893 and was assigned to labor in the Stockholm Conference. After serving an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 16 November 1893 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 333, 335).

Anders sharpened scissors in the winter and farmed in the summer. He was ordained a high priest on 30 October 1897 by Elijah Sheets at the Assembly Hall, Salt Lake City, Utah. He died in 1910 in Hunter at age seventy-four.


Ola Nilsson Stohl

1835–1926

Residence: Brigham City, Box Elder Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 11 November 1879

Missionary labors: Göteborg Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 29 August 1881

Departure ship: Pacific

Birth date: 9 November 1835

Birthplace: Stora Slågarp, Malmöhus, Sweden

Father: Stohl, Nils Larsson

Mother: Södervall, Elsa Andersdotter

Spouse: Johnson, Kerstin Pehrsdotter

Marriage date: 16 April 1864

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 13 November 1926

Death place: Brigham City, Box Elder Co., Utah

Burial place: Brigham City, Box Elder Co., Utah

Ola grew up in the town of Klörup with five brothers and two sisters. His father was a soldier and a gardener and his mother was a midwife. He started school at age nine, studying in the winters and working for farmers in the summers. When he was twelve, his parents apprenticed him to a tailor because he was “not a strong boy.” He worked for no pay “late and early for three years.” By age fifteen, he was working for wages (see Stohl, “Short History of My Life Experience,” 1; “Keep the Faith,” 1–2).

During the Christmas holiday of 1843, he learned that family members had joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Upon hearing the doctrines of this church, Ola “got the impression that what [his brother Nels] said was according to scripture.” Having been “trained expressly” by his mother to study scripture and pray, he was “naturally religiously inclined” and thought “continually” about what his brother had said (Stohl, “Short History of My Life Experience,” 1). On 16 January 1854, he attended a Latter-day Saint conference in Malmö, where several elders bore their testimonies about “the sufferings they had past [sic] through, and their joy in being messengers of Christ in this last dispensation.” After listening to the testimonies, Ola was baptized on 15 January 1854 in a hole cut in the ice (see Stohl, “Short History of My Life Experience,” 1).

The next spring, he departed for Copenhagen and in September 1855, he was called on a local mission to Southeast Sjælland. He had “many weird experiences” as a missionary but concluded that “all were for the good for ourselves and the work of the Lord which we were engaged in.” In May 1856, he was ordained an elder and was sent on a mission to Stockholm. About ninety miles north of Stockholm, he baptized several people. “This was too much for the priests of that part. They caused [the] arrest [of Ola and his companion.] The sheriff was not hard against us, but friendly. The judgment against me was that after I was through with my work that I should leave that part of the country, which was just what I wanted because I could not stay any longer” (Stohl, “Short History of My Life Experience,” 2).

In fall 1856, Ola presided over the Norrköping Branch, Östergotland County, Sweden, while supporting himself as a tailor in the vicinity. His employer was “very religious” and fired him when Ola attempted to convert him. Ola next worked for the “leading tailor and merchant company,” run by “a German who professed no religion.” The local priest sent the police to convince his employer to let him go. He refused, saying that Ola was trustworthy and didn’t spend his time “loafing and drinking” like other employees (Stohl, “Short History of My Life Experience,” 2).

In 1858, he was called as president of the Norrköping Conference. Because of his limited schooling, he was afraid he couldn’t do the work required; however, the mission president told him to “go to work and the Lord would assist” him. He found that to be true. “My Heavenly Father has been very kind to me in permitting me to be one of his humble messengers in bringing good tidings of joy to my fellow beings in my mother country and other places according to arrangement,” he wrote (Stohl, “Short History of My Life Experience,” 3).

After serving for six and a half years as a missionary in Sweden and Denmark, Ola was released to immigrate to America. On the voyage across the Atlantic, he helped make a list of the passengers for the captain. This led to his being invited to eat at the captain’s table. “This did me much good, for I with the balance of the emigrants was almost starved for want of proper food,” he penned. Ola also helped the ship’s doctor and took care of the sick. He buried thirteen passengers at sea (see Stohl, “Short History of My Life Experience,” 3).

While journeying across the plains, Ola had both of his legs run over by a wagon. He anointed himself with consecrated oil and was about his duties the next day. He arrived in Salt Lake City on 22 September 1862. In the Salt Lake Valley, he worked in a molasses mill owned by Brigham Young before beginning his trade of making buckskin pants and gloves (see “Keep the Faith,” 4).

On 19 November 1862, he was ordained a seventy. He served in the Sixty-fifth Quorum of the Seventy until moving with his family to Brigham City, Box Elder County (see “Keep the Faith,” 4). In 1879, he left his family in Brigham City to serve a mission in Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 11 November 1879 and was assigned to labor as president of the Göteborg Conference. At the close of this mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 29 August 1881 aboard the steamer Pacific (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 310, 312, 319).

After his return to Brigham City, Ola served in a number of Church and civic positions. He was president of the Box Elder Stake from 1905 to 1916 and president of the Scandinavian meetings in Brigham City. Biographer Andrew Jenson wrote of him, “Nothing gives Brother Stohl greater pleasure than to testify of the goodness of the Lord towards him since he received a knowledge of the gospel of Jesus Christ” (Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:295). He died in 1926 in Brigham City at age ninety-one.


Oleen Nilson Stohl

1865–1916

Residence: Brigham City, Box Elder Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 28 August 1889

Missionary labors: Skåne and Stockholm conferences

Departure date from Copenhagen: 17 September 1891

Birth date: 19 February 1865

Birthplace: Sugar House, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Father: Stohl, Ola Nilsson

Mother: Johnson, Christina

Spouse: Peters, Sarah Louisa

Marriage date: 7 September 1892

Marriage place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Death date: 28 November 1916

Death place: Brigham City, Box Elder Co., Utah

Burial place: Brigham City, Box Elder Co., Utah

On 14 September 1873, Oleen was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints by Elijah A. Box. He grew up in Brigham City, Box Elder County, Utah, and was reported to have “learned the dignity of becoming a contributor to the family income” by herding sheep as a small boy. He also learned the trades of cabinetmaking and carpentry and while still a teenager, left home to work in Albion, Cassia County, Idaho. There he not only found employment but also service as a local missionary among “non-Mormons, and even anti-Mormons.” It was reported that he lived his faith so valiantly that he earned the respect and friendship of all (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 3:528–29).

As a young adult, he served as a president of the Fifty-eighth Quorum of the Seventy and as a home missionary in the Box Elder Stake. He was educated at Deseret University before accepting a teaching position in Brigham City. In addition to being a teacher, he worked as a bookkeeper for the Bear River Canal Company and as a cashier at the local bank. He served as a clerk in Box Elder County for two terms, school trustee in Brigham City for six years, and trustee of the Brigham Young College at Logan, Cache County. He also started a successful furniture company (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 3:529).

In 1889, Oleen accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 28 August 1889 and was assigned to labor in the Skåne and Stockholm conferences (see Hatch, “Oleen N. Stohl,” 8; Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 3:529). At the close of this mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 17 September 1891 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 310, 319).

He returned to Brigham City, where in 1899 he was called to be a counselor in the Box Elder Stake presidency. He served as president of the Box Elder Stake from 1905 until his death in 1916 at age fifty-one. President Joseph F. Smith said of him, “There was not a better man living, in or out of the Church, than Oleen N. Stohl.” A friend added, “He was a man of God who magnified his calling and a leader who presided in love and humility, wisdom and justice” (Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 3:528).


Charles John Stromberg

(Carl Johan Strömberg)

1847–1932

Residence: Grantsville, Tooele Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 18 November 1884

Missionary labors: Stockholm Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 8 April 1886

Departure ship: Bravo

Birth date: 8 April 1847

Birthplace: Elfsborg, (Kyrkofalla) Tibro, Skaraborg, Sweden

Father: Strömberg, Jan (John)

Mother: Eliæsdatter, Ulrika Julina

Spouse: Erickson, Anna Dorothea

Marriage date: 10 January 1876

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 11 November 1932

Death place: Grantsville, Tooele Co., Utah

Burial place: Grantsville, Tooele Co., Utah

Charles was the sixth of eight children born to John Strömberg. When he was five years old, his mother died. When he was ten, his father died, leaving him “to the mercy of the world.” Three years later, missionaries from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints taught him the gospel. He migrated to America and arrived amid the Civil War. Charles remembered seeing “charred remains of houses, fences, railroad tracks and heavy artillery. Our train stopped many times to repair tracks or for exploring parties to investigate the safety of the road.” In October 1862, he arrived in Salt Lake City (see Stromberg, “Autobiography of Charles John Stromberg,” 1).

He settled in Grantsville, Tooele County, Utah, where Dan Jacobs employed him on his farm. He was able to attend school “for four or five months” in the winter and work on the farm in the summer. From Grantsville, he moved to Bear Lake County, Idaho, until “the weather drove us out to find more food.” He then returned to Grantsville where he worked seven years for a man named Judd as “second boss over farm work” (Stromberg, “Autobiography of Charles John Stromberg,” 2). He also helped deliver mail and build the Union Pacific Railroad.

At one point, Charles was required to have military training in Tooele as part of the community’s defense program. This training led to his being called to escort President Brigham Young from Grantsville to Tooele on several occasions (see Stromberg, “Autobiography of Charles John Stromberg,” 2).

Charles “fell in love with a young lady with long black curls, Annie Dorothea Erickson.” In January 1876, they were married in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City. They then bought a home in Grantsville and “lived comfortably and happy with a family of six children” (Stromberg, “Autobiography of Charles John Stromberg,” 2).

In 1884, Charles accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He sold his interest in a threshing machine and “a few cows and other things” to have the means to serve the mission. He left Grantsville with four hundred dollars in a little bag sewed to his underclothes. That money paid for his round trip to Sweden, as well as a few souvenirs and some silverware (see Stromberg, “Autobiography of Charles John Stromberg,” 2–4).

He arrived in Copenhagen on 18 November 1884 and was assigned to labor in the Stockholm Conference (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 282–83). He served “principally on the Island of Gotland and in the Eskilstuna branch [Södermanland County]” (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 221). Charles returned from this mission on 8 April 1886. Upon his return, he found out that his children had all died from diphtheria. He learned the details of the tragedy from friends because his wife couldn’t speak of it. She became so distraught that some thought her sanity in peril, so the Church patriarch gave her a blessing. In that blessing, she was promised that she would have another family “larger than the one she had lost.” This promise was fulfilled. By age forty-seven, she had given birth to seven more children (see Stromberg, “Autobiography of Charles John Stromberg,” 4).

Having sold most of his belongings before his mission, Charles had to begin anew when he returned. He became an expert sheep shearer, then “took up threshing” again, and leased a mill. He interrupted these business ventures to accept a mission call to the Native Americans of Skull Valley (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 221).

From 1900 to 1905, he managed a store with two brothers-in-law. He then purchased “a large farm at the extreme end of Grantsville and . . . there began farming on a large scale.” He also hauled supplies to the Western Pacific Railroad crew. He “made good money” and gained “a reputation of owning a good feed and livery station. Many times he was also needed to take injured men from the railroad camp to Salt Lake, a journey of about 60 miles; sometimes they died on the way” (Stromberg, “Autobiography of Charles John Stromberg,” 3).

After the railroad was finished, Charles felt that he was “getting too old for hard work,” so he did “odd jobs” around the farm until age seventy-seven. “I have worked hard all my life, but still believe I am good for many more years,” he wrote. Such was the case. He served as a city councilman for eight years and as an assessor for four years. He was a Tooele County Road Supervisor, president of two local irrigation companies, and treasurer of the People’s Trading Company until 1920 (see “Autobiography of Charles John Stromberg,” 3).

His dying wish was to vote for Herbert Hoover as president of the United States. His wife said of him, “Charles would never argue with me and could not stay mad long with anyone” (“Autobiography of Charles John Stromberg,” 5). He died in 1932 in Grantsville at age eighty-five.


Peter Sundwall

(Pehr Olofsson)

1848–1925

Residence: Fairview, Sanpete Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 1 September 1881

Missionary labors: Copenhagen Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 4 April 1884

Departure ship: Milo

Birth date: 11 June 1848

Birthplace: Aspås, Jämtland, Sweden

Father: Nilsson, Olof

Mother: Ersdotter, Catharina

Spouse: Johannesson, Anna Cajsa

Marriage date: 1 February 1875

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 17 July 1925

Death place: Holladay, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Burial place: Fairview, Sanpete Co., Utah

On 27 February 1866, Peter joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and served a local mission in the Stockholm Conference. In 1872, he immigrated to America and settled in Fairview, Sanpete County, Utah (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 3:724). In that community, he changed his name from Peter Olofsson to Peter Sundwall (see Sundwall, Peter Sundwall, 33).

Peter worked on the American Fork Railroad in Utah County. He received a wage of $2.50 to $3.00 a day. This was enough money to pay his emigration debts and fund his brother’s wife and his future bride’s emigration expenses to America. By 1875, he was a carpenter in Fairview, Sanpete County. He helped construct a tunnel, a coalmine shaft, and a local co-op store (see Sundwall, Peter Sundwall, 38–39).

In 1881, Peter left Fairview to accept a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 1 September 1881 and was assigned to labor in the mission office. At the close of an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 4 April 1884 aboard the steamer Milo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 262–63, 278).

Upon returning to Fairview, he became a successful farmer. He was president and manager of the Fairview co-op, which “thrived” under his direction. When the price of wool dropped sharply, Peter “cornered the market” (Sundwall, Peter Sundwall, 30–42).

He served in a number of civic positions including school trustee, member of city council, mayor, postmaster, and county commissioner. He helped get a water system for the city as well as electricity and streetlights. He also helped obtain pensions for widows of Black Hawk War veterans. He was president of the Fairview State Bank and director of the Union Roller Mill (see Sundwall, Peter Sundwall, 42–47).

In 1894, Peter was called on a second mission to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 30 March 1894 and was assigned to be president of the Scandinavian Mission (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 338, 342, 410). During this mission, he reported a miraculous healing on 4 April 1895:

A certain child, who was suffering with pain and had for several days been unable to walk, was brought to the hall (in which the Saints held meetings) by one of the sisters, who asked the Elders to administer to the child, saying that she had told its parents that the child would be healed if the Elders would anoint it with oil and pray for it. The Elders administered to the child, and it was taken home well, being able to walk and ask for something to eat. The parents attended the meetings of the Saints afterwards and testified to the healing of their child; later they embraced the gospel and felt happy in the knowledge which they had received. (Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 343)

In his History of the Scandinavian Mission, Andrew Jenson sums up Peter’s term of service:

Elder Peter Sundwall, who had presided over the Scandinavian Mission since April, 1894, left Copenhagen June 11, 1896, leaving the mission in charge of Elder Christian N. Lund from Mount Pleasant, Utah. Elder Sundwall’s administration had been a most successful one. Being a man of wisdom, sound judgment and exemplary in all his habits, he had great influence with Elders, local Saints and the people generally who came into his presence, and he left the mission in a prosperous condition. (Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 350)

In 1901, Peter was ordained a high priest and called to serve on the high council of the North Sanpete Stake. From 1908 to 1910, he served again as president of the Scandinavian Mission (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 482). Returning to Utah, Peter served in a number of Church positions, including a president of the Twenty-sixth Quorum of the Seventy and stake patriarch, having been ordained by Hyrum G. Smith (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 3:724). He died in 1925 in Salt Lake City at age seventy-seven.


Lars Svendsen

(Lars Swensen)

1826–94

Residence: Moroni, Sanpete Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 3 May 1882

Missionary labors: Århus Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 15 June 1883

Departure ship: Pacific (Milo)

Birth date: 16 October 1826

Birthplace: Øster Bording, Balle, Viborg, Denmark

Father: Larsen, Sven

Mother: Jensdatter Karen

Spouse: Christensen, Mariana

Marriage date: 11 November 1851

Marriage place: Denmark

Spouse: Sorensen, Kjersten

Marriage date: 19 July 1858

Marriage place: Denmark

Spouse: Christensen, Annie Eliza

Marriage date: 19 July 1862

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 13 November 1894

Death place: Moroni, Sanpete Co., Utah

Burial place: Moroni, Sanpete Co., Utah

Lars spent his early years in Denmark, where he learned the trade of weaving. On 5 January 1857, he and his wife were baptized members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Lars was ordained a teacher on 5 January 1857 and a priest one month later. By March 1857, he had been ordained an elder and was serving as president of the Zörkild Branch. That same year, he and his wife immigrated to America (see “Life History of Lars Swensen,” 2).

They settled in Moroni, Sanpete County, Utah. In that community, Lars served in the bishopric before being called as bishop in 1868. He also served as a captain in the Black Hawk War (see “Life History of Lars Swensen,” 2).

In 1878, he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 25 September 1878 and was assigned to labor in the Århus Conference. He served as president of that conference from 1879 to 1880. After completing an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 2 April 1880 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 235–36, 243).

In 1882, Lars returned to Scandinavia on a second mission. He arrived in Copenhagen on 3 May 1882 and was assigned to labor in the Århus Conference. After serving faithfully for thirteen months, he departed from Copenhagen on 15 June 1883 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 267–69, 498).

Upon returning to Moroni, he was imprisoned for cohabitation. He served ninety days in prison and paid a fifty-dollar fine before being released (see Jenson, Church Chronology, 9 October 1888). Lars died in 1894 in Moroni at age sixty-eight.


August Swenson

(August Svenson)

1836–1927

Residence: Spanish Fork, Utah Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 5 June 1883

Missionary labors: Stockholm Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 17 October 1884

Departure ship: Bravo

Birth date: 7 August 1836

Birthplace: Torebo, Stafsinge, Halland, Sweden

Father: Andersson, Sven

Mother: Andersdotter, Brita

Spouse: Peterson, Bertha Olson

Marriage date: 31 January 1859

Marriage place: Spanish Fork, Utah Co., Utah

Spouse: Johnson, Gretha Birgithe

Marriage date: 14 November 1868

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Hansen, Sarah Petersen

Marriage date: 12 April 1878

Marriage place: St. George, Washington Co., Utah

Death date: 26 January 1927

Death place: Spanish Fork, Utah Co., Utah

Burial place: Spanish Fork City Cemetery, Spanish Fork, Utah Co., Utah

As a boy, August worked on a farm before being employed in 1851 in a weaving factory. A friend at the factory invited him to attend a Latter-day Saint meeting. Although he went only out of curiosity, he “was converted and baptized” in June 1853 (“History of August Anderson Swenson,” 1). He was then ordained a deacon and sent to visit local Latter-day Saints.

By November 1855, he had saved enough money to immigrate to America. He sailed to the United States aboard the John Boyden. After arriving in New York Harbor, he journeyed to Burlington, Lee County, Iowa. In Burlington, he boarded with a man who told him the local people were antagonistic toward the Saints. Leaving that community, he journeyed to St. Louis County, Missouri, where he worked in a match factory. It was only after borrowing eight dollars that he had enough money to continue his trek to the Salt Lake Valley. After a difficult overland experience with the Knud Peterson ox team company, he arrived in the valley on 19 September 1856 (see “History of August Anderson Swenson,” 1–2).

Brigham Young advised August to move to Spanish Fork, Utah County. He complied. In Spanish Fork, he was employed digging potatoes. He moved to Springville, Utah County, where he hauled wood, hoping to increase his financial base. Having failed to do so, he returned to Spanish Fork and purchased just five acres of land and a yoke of oxen (see “History of August Anderson Swenson,” 2–4).

Nine years later, he was sent to colonize the “Little Muddy” region. The assignment was short-lived. By 1882, August was serving an eight-month mission in the northern states (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 222). In 1883, he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 5 June 1883 and was assigned to labor in the Stockholm Conference. At the close of this mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 17 October 1884 aboard the steamer Bravo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 274, 280).

After returning to Spanish Fork, he supported his family by farming. He also worked for eighteen years in several capacities for the Spanish Fork Cooperative Mercantile Institution. He served as first counselor in the bishopric of the Spanish Fork Fourth Ward and as a president of the Fiftieth Quorum of the Seventy before being called to serve on the Nebo Stake High Council. According to his biographer, his overriding characteristics were “absolute honesty and dedication to hard work” (“History of August Anderson Swenson,” 4).

In 1899, August served a term in the Utah Penitentiary for cohabitation. Before completing his imprisonment, he received a full pardon from president Grover Cleveland (see “History of August Anderson Swenson,” 3).

At age eighty-six, he was a ward teacher. He died in 1927 in Spanish Fork at age ninety. His funeral service was held in the Spanish Fork Fourth Ward (see “History of August Anderson Swenson,” 4).


Otto Julius Swenson

(Otto Julius Lindelöf)

1852–

Residence: Plain City, Weber Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 8 November 1887

Missionary labors: Göteborg Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 8 August 1889

Departure ship: Bravo

Birth date: 9 February 1852

Birthplace: Pålstorp, Raus, Malmöhus, Sweden

Father: Svensson, Carl Magnus

Mother: Linström, Maria

Spouse: Anderson, Charlotte Augena

Marriage date: 8 September 1873

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Otto Julius was named after his brother who was born in 1849 and who died a year later in 1850. Otto’s father, Carl Magnus Svensson, who was a shoemaker, died three months after Otto was born. Maria Lindström, Otto’s mother, was a widow for seven years before marrying the master shoemaker Niels Peter Lindelöf on 30 October 1859. The depth of the negative feelings toward the early members of the Church is evidenced in notes found in the Raus parish records (Maria Lindstöm and Niels Peter Lindelöf were “warned against joining the Mormons in 1856”). Before Otto’s stepfather could obtain his master’s certificate as a shoemaker, he had to go back to the Lutheran Church and take the sacrament. Otto’s mother also “reluctantly took the Lutheran sacrament” before she and Niels Peter Lindelöf were married. The record indicates that this couple, along with Otto, moved to an “unspecified place” on 4 April 1861 (Raus parish clerical survey 1854–1861, FHL #0145639, 124).

Records show the family immigrated to Utah on the Monarch of the Sea in May 1861. They settled in Plain City, Weber County, Utah, where Otto’s mother died on 6 January 1873. Later that same year, on 8 September, Otto Julius married Charlotte Augena Andersen in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City. His stepfather, Niels Peter Lindelöf also left that same year when he was called back to his native country to serve a mission.

Otto was still a resident of Plain City when he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1887, leaving behind his wife and four children to answer the call. He arrived in Copenhagen on 8 November 1887 and was assigned to labor in the Göteborg Conference. At the close of an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 8 August 1889 aboard the steamer Bravo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 304–5, 309).

Otto’s occupations included picture engraver, watchman on a steam railroad, and county selectman. He is listed on the 1880, 1900, and 1920 U.S. censuses. In 1920, he was living in Pocatello, Bannock County, Idaho.


Lars Fredrick Swalberg

(Lars Fredric Svalberg)

1845–95

Residence: Gunnison, Sanpete Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 28 September 1883

Missionary labors: Stockholm Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 11 June 1885

Departure ship: Bravo

Birth date: 24 January 1845

Birthplace: Näfveqvarn, Tunaberg, Södermanland, Sweden

Father: Svalberg, Nils

Mother: Andersdotter, Anna Stina (Christina)

Spouse: Parsson, Cathrina Charlotta

Marriage date: 7 April 1881

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 1 May 1895

Death place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Burial place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Lars, a resident of Gunnison, Sanpete County, Utah, accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1883. He arrived in Copenhagen on 28 September 1883 and was assigned to labor in the Stockholm Conference. At the close of an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 11 June 1885 aboard the steamer Bravo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 274, 276, 290). He died in 1895 in Salt Lake City at age fifty.