H

Susan Easton Black, Shauna C. Anderson Young, and Ruth Ellen Maness, section H in Legacy of Sacrifice: Missionaries to Scandinavia, 1872–94 (Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, 2007), 129–74.

Niels Larson Hagberg

(Nils Larsson)

1840–1905

Residence: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 28 September 1886

Missionary labors: Stockholm Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 23 August 1888

Name of departure ship: Cato

Birth date: 26 July 1840

Birthplace: 8 Raskarum, Sankt Olof, Kristianstad, Sweden

Father: Neilson, Lars

Mother: Högberg, Anna Maria

Spouse: Josephine (divorced)

Spouse: Westwood, Sarah

Marriage date: 16 July 1884

Marriage place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Spouse: Larson, Emelia Sophie

Marriage date: 13 March 1889

Marriage place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Spouse: Anderson, Louisa

Death date: 14 February 1905

Death place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Burial place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Niels was born 26 July 1840 and was listed as the illegitimate child of Anna Maria Hagberg. When he received his patriarchal blessing on 3 March 1882 in Salt Lake City, Utah, the father was listed as Lars Nielson (see Patriarchal Blessings Index #79:12).

Niels was baptized on 10 December 1871 in Grevlunda (Vitaby parish) by B. P. Textorius. On 20 May 1872, he was ordained a priest by P. S. Holmgren and on 3 June 1872 an elder by Paul Dehlin. He served a local mission in Hälsingborg (Malmöhus County) and labored in the Skåne Conference until 1875. He was released from his missionary labors and was encouraged to journey to Zion (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 123). He emigrated on 25 June 1875.

In the 1880 Census, Granite Precinct, Salt Lake County, Utah, Niels is listed as a miner. It is also indicated that he was divorced.

While residing in Salt Lake City, Niels accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 28 September 1886 and was assigned to labor in the Stockholm Conference. During this mission, he served in Malmö, Hälsingborg, Kristianstad, and Blekinge (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 123). After completing an honorable mission, Niels departed from Copenhagen on 23 August 1888 aboard the steamer Cato with sixty-two emigrating Latter-day Saints and four other returning missionaries (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 299–300, 305).

In the 1890 Utah directory of Salt Lake City, Logan, and Provo, Niels is listed as a tailor. He was employed by Philip Spry, whose business was located at 457 West 300 North in Salt Lake City. On 14 February 1905, Niels died at LDS Hospital in Salt Lake City. He was buried in the Salt Lake City Cemetery.


John Hagman

(Jöns Jönsson)

1841–1930

Residence: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 4 May 1885

Missionary labors: Skåne Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 7 April 1887

Name of departure ship: Panther

Birth date: 18 March 1841

Birthplace: Högestorp N. 2, Reslöv, Malmöhus, Sweden

Father: Fredriksson, Jons (John)

Mother: Larsdotter, Karna P.

Spouse: Hanson, Ingri

Marriage date: 30 January 1871

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 13 January 1930

Death place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Burial place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

His father was an alcoholic, and made life miserable for John and his mother. To escape his cruelty, John tended geese as a boy and learned the trade of tailoring as a youth (see Young, “Stories of John Hagman,” 1).

He had an unusual introduction to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. After reading the Book of Mormon, he saw a pillar of fire before him that witnessed it was true. He was baptized in 1860 at Malmö, Sweden, by John Fagerberg. After his baptism, he was ordained an elder and served a local mission, presiding over the Gårdstånga Branch (Malmöhus County) from 1866 to 1867 before laboring in the Småland, Växjö Branch (Kronoberg County) and the Lyngby Branch (Malmöhus County) (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 109; Young, “Stories of John Hagman,” 1).

In 1869, he immigrated to Utah, arriving in Salt Lake City on 8 August 1869 (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 109; Young, “Stories of John Hagman,” 1). In the city, he was ordained a seventy in March 1885 and accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 4 May 1885 and labored in the Skåne Conference. During this mission, he presided over three different branches—Kristianstad (Kristianstad County), Lund (Malmöhus County), and Trelleborg (Malmöhus County). He wrote, “In all my experiences since I came into this church, that I never saw a moment in my life when I regretted the means, or labor, or time that I have spent for God’s great work” (letter from J. Hagman to Albien Caine and family, 28 March 1911). He departed from Copenhagen on 7 April 1887 aboard the steamer Panther (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 293–95).

Returning to Utah, John became the owner of the Nelson Tailoring Company. Although he enjoyed tailoring, his favorite pastime was gardening at his home in the Salt Lake area. Later in his life, he worked in the Salt Lake Temple. One day, while walking home from the temple, he was hit by a streetcar on Main Street. He died in 1930 at the home of his son-in-law in Salt Lake City at age eighty-eight. Funeral services were held in the drawing room of the Joseph William Taylor Mortuary (see “Tailor Will Be Buried Thursday,” Deseret News, 15 January 1930).


Pehr Håkanson

1839–1936

Residence: Hyrum, Cache Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 28 September 1886

Missionary labors: Skåne Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 24 May 1888

Name of departure ship: Milo

Birth date: 7 July 1839

Birthplace: Bästekille, Södra Mellby, Kristianstad, Sweden

Father: Jönsson, Håkan

Mother: Johnsdotter, Anna

Spouse: Ockerman, Annie Marie Olsson

Marriage date: 24 June 1871

Marriage place: aboard Minnesota

Spouse: Jensen, Mary Christina

Marriage date: 25 April 1885

Marriage place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Death date: 2 August 1936

Death place: Ogden, Weber Co., Utah

Burial place: Mount Ogden Memorial Park, Ogden, Weber Co., Utah

Pehr was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on 9 February 1870 in the Baltic Sea by Johan A. Halvorsen. He served as a local missionary for three months in the Kristianstad and Hässleholm (Kristianstad) branches before immigrating to the United States in 1871. He was married aboard ship during the crossing (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 124).

He and his bride settled in Hyrum, Cache County, Utah. Pehr worked as a carpenter on the St. George, Manti, Salt Lake, and Logan temples. In 1875, he joined the United Order and on 7 January 1884 was ordained a seventy and became a member of the Sixty-second Quorum of the Seventy (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 124).

In 1886, he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 28 September 1886 and was assigned to labor in the Skåne Conference. After serving an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 24 May 1888 aboard the steamer Milo. He crossed the Atlantic Ocean aboard the Wisconsin (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 299–300, 305).

Returning to Utah, Pehr became active in genealogical and temple work. He was inspired by dreams and a patriarchal blessing that promised him “holy messengers” would help him in this work (“Journal of Pehr Hokanson”). Despite his interest in family data collection, both of his marriages ended in divorce.

His family problems were attributed to successive moves—Salem, Utah County, Utah; Coalville, Wasatch County, Utah; and Rexburg, Madison County, Idaho. By 1905, he was residing in Ogden, Weber County, Utah. On 22 October 1905, he was ordained a high priest by Jesse M. Baker. One year later, he was “struck with paralysis” and was no longer able to farm. In his later years, he worked with his son at the Ogden Egg Company (see correspondence from Christine Cox, 6 September 1999). Pehr died in 1936 in Ogden at age ninety-seven.

Truls Asser Hallgren

(Truls Assarsson)

1835–1902

Residence: Ogden, Weber Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 28 August 1889

Missionary labors: Skåne Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 16 April 1891

Name of departure ship: Cameo

Birth date: 5 January 1835

Birthplace: Klörup, Lilla Slågarp, Malmöhus, Sweden

Father: Hallgren, Assar Sven

Mother: Trulsdotter, Inger

Spouse: Bjurling, Clara

Marriage date: 20 May 1864

Marriage place: aboard Monarch of the Sea

Spouse: Johnson, Rebecca Ford

Marriage date: 10 January 1884

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 4 September 1902

Death place: Ogden, Weber Co., Utah

Burial place: Ogden, Weber Co., Utah

From age eleven, Truls worked for his father in a blacksmith shop. In 1853 his father died leaving Truls to take over the shop. Frustrated by the heavy responsibility, he closed the shop and left home (see “Journal of Truls Asser Hallgren,” 1–3).

By 1858, he was working in a wagon shop where a Latter-day Saint was also employed. Through his coworker’s influence, and after considerable study and prayer, he was baptized on 26 August 1858 a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. One month later, he was called to labor as a local missionary. Because of the growing opposition to the missionaries, he held few meetings. However, he did distribute pamphlets and talk to people individually on Sundays. These actions led to his forced appearance before a council of the Lutheran Church. At the council, he was told to quit meeting and teaching Mormonism. He and his companion were fined seventy-five kronor each or one month in prison. Truls chose prison. The prison was very cold and rations were scanty. On the day of his release, he recorded that he was “none the worse, and thankful to the Lord for the truth that he has revealed, which was worth more to us than anything else in this world” (“Journal of Truls Asser Hallgren,” 1–6).

During the next four years, Truls continued to suffer opposition for his religious beliefs—even from his own mother. Despite his hardships, he baptized fifty-eight people before immigrating to America in 1864. During the voyage, he married Clara Bjurling. After arriving in New York Harbor, he and his bride journeyed across the plains to reach the Salt Lake Valley. They settled in Ogden, Weber County, Utah (see “Journal of Truls Asser Hallgren,” 6–8).

While residing in Ogden, Truls accepted two mission calls to Scandinavia. The first was quite brief, from 1 June 1878 to 7 September 1878, in which he labored in Finland. The second mission lasted from 1889 to 1891, during which time he presided over the Skåne Conference (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 233, 235, 276, 310, 312, 318).

Returning to Utah, Truls supported his family as a farmer, blacksmith, and locksmith. Family members credit him with also being an inventor. They claim that he devised a washing machine, a sewing machine, and a new type of plow (see “Journal of Truls Asser Hallgren,” addendum). He died in 1902 in Ogden at age sixty-seven.

John Anton Halverson

1842–87

Residence: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 24 September 1878

Missionary labors: Skåne Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 5 July 1880

Name of departure ship: Leo (Cato)

Birth date: 3 August 1842

Birthplace: Svinevol, Våle, Vestfold, Norway

Father: Arnesen, Halvor

Mother: Gulliksdatter, Inger Olea

Spouse: Rosenquist, Christine Charlotte

Marriage date: 10 October 1871

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 2 April 1887

Death place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Burial place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

John was baptized on 8 March 1866. Following his baptism, he served a local mission for four years, traveling through much of Scandinavia. After the mission, he migrated to America and settled in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah, where he was employed as a machinist. He was known among his peers as a “great intellect but was very humble and greatly respected by all who knew him” (“Sudden Death—Brother John A. Halverson,” Deseret News, 2 April 1887).

John accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1878. He arrived in Copenhagen on 24 September 1878 and was assigned to preside over the Skåne Conference. He departed from Copenhagen on 5 July 1880 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 235).

Seven years later, he died in Salt Lake City at age forty-four. His death was most unusual. In the morning of 2 April 1887, he appeared to be fine. But after completing his chores, he became violently ill. His speech organs were paralyzed, and then he died. His funeral was held in the Salt Lake Fourth Ward (see “Sudden Death—Brother John A. Halverson,” Deseret News, 2 April 1887).

Jonas Halvorsen

1824–1902

Residence: Richmond, Cache Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 20 November 1878

Missionary labors: Christiania Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 28 August 1880

Name of departure ship: Otto

Birth date: 16 June 1824

Birthplace: Rebansbæcka, Bragernes-Drammen, Buskerud, Norway

Father: Olsen, Halvor

Mother: Moensdatter, Olog

Spouse: Gundersdatter, Karen Henricka

Marriage date: 17 March 1846

Marriage place: Christiania, Christiania, Norway

Spouse: Johansen, Kirsten

Marriage date: 2 March 1867

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 22 December 1902

Death place: Provo, Utah Co., Utah

Burial place: Richmond Cemetery, Richmond, Cache Co., Utah

On 20 May 1854, Jonas and his wife, Karen, were baptized members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Their oldest son, Louis, was baptized the next year. From the time they joined the Church, the Halvorsen family hoped to journey to Utah. But because they couldn’t afford the fare for the entire family, they sent Louis in 1857. In Utah, Louis worked hard and sent money to his parents so that they could also emigrate. By 1859, the family was reunited and settled in Cache Valley. They lived in a one-room dirt dugout until a fort was built. Their housing was somewhat better in the fort—each family had a one-room log cabin facing the interior of the fort compound and twenty acres of land adjacent to their cabin (see Bamgartner, “Jonas [Johannes] Halverson, Pioneer 1859,” 1–4).

They all seemed to prosper until 1867. In that year, Jonas took a second wife without getting the consent of his first wife. This led to so many family problems that Jonas moved with his second wife to Richmond, Cache County. He had little contact with his first family after his move (see Bamgartner, “Jonas [Johannes] Halverson, Pioneer 1859,” 4).

In 1878, he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He was excited when the call came for “he had longed to return to his homeland and teach the Gospel to his friends and loved ones” (Bamgartner, “Jonas [Johannes] Halverson, Pioneer 1859,” 4). He arrived in Copenhagen on 20 November 1878 and was assigned to preside over the Christiania Conference. After completing an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 28 August 1880 aboard the steamer Otto (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 235–36, 244).

He returned to Utah, only to face new problems. The last years of his life, he became forgetful. He was committed to the Provo Mental Hospital, where he died at age seventy-eight. In 1910, a monument was erected in the town square of Hyrum, Cache County, Utah, to honor the original pioneers of the community. The name of Jonas Halverson appears on the monument (see Bamgartner, “Jonas [Johannes] Halverson, Pioneer 1859,” 3–4).

Andrew Paulsen Hammer

(Andreas Andreasen)

1821–1903

Residence: Mill Creek, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 20 May 1879

Missionary labors: Christiania Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 5 July 1880

Name of departure ship: Leo (Cato)

Birth date: 2 February 1821

Birthplace: Hammeren, Hitra, Sør Trøndelag, Norway
Father: Paalsen, Andreas
Mother: Evensdatter, Berethe

Spouse: Fredericksen, Mary Christine (Claudia)

Marriage date: 19 May 1845

Marriage place: Hitra, Sør Trøndelag, Norway

Spouse: Nelson, Frederikka Charlotte Svensson

Marriage date: 11 August 1873

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 15 March 1903

Death place: South Cottonwood, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Burial place: Murray City Cemetery, Murray, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Andrew, a fisherman by trade, joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in 1863. He changed his name to Andrew Hammer when he moved to the United States in 1864. He crossed the plains with the William B. Preston company and arrived in the Salt Lake Valley on 15 September 1864 (see Hammer, “Andreas Poulsen Hammer,” 1).

Andrew settled on 6400 South 1600 East in South Cottonwood, Salt Lake County. He was appointed by his neighbors to be an entry man to the neighborhood. It was his responsibility to clear the land title of new arrivals in South Cottonwood (see Hammer, “Andreas Poulsen Hammer,” 1).

In 1879, Andrew was living in Mill Creek, Salt Lake County, when he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 20 May 1879 and was assigned to labor in the Christiania Conference. According to his wife Frederikka, she met Andrew in the mission home in Stockholm, Sweden. She claimed that he promised her that if she saved her money and came to Utah, he would marry her. She saved her money and wrote to him often after he returned to Utah (see Hammer, “Andreas Poulsen Hammer,” 2; Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 238, 244).

Not until her arrival in Zion did she discover he was already married; nevertheless, she married him. Andrew was arrested for his plural marriages in 1887. However, he was released the same day (see Hammer, “Andreas Poulsen Hammer,” 2–3). He died in 1903 in South Cottonwood at age eighty-two.

Pauli E. B. Hammer

(Pauli Edmund Balthasar Hammer)

1839–1929

Residence: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 14 September 1880

Missionary labors: Copenhagen Conference and German part of Scandinavia

Departure date from Copenhagen: 17 October 1884

Name of departure ship: Bravo

Birth date: 28 July 1839

Birthplace: Fåborg, Svendborg, Denmark

Father: Hammer, (Svend) Lauritz

Mother: Arntzdatter, Kristine Marie

Spouse: Funk, Julia Maria

Marriage date: 4 June 1864

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Balle (Nielsen), Mette Marie

Marriage date: 7 December 1868

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Seliger, Anna Pauline

Marriage date: 20 December 1882

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Haney, Mary Marie

Marriage date: 29 July 1885

Marriage place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Spouse: Jeppson, Henriette Emilia

Marriage date: 16 July 1886

Marriage place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Death date: 3 November 1929

Death place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Burial place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

For three years, Pauli studied to be an artist in Germany and Austria. His father, a goldsmith, paid for his schooling. Pauli spoke French, German, Danish, and English. On 20 November 1860, he joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. A year later, he immigrated to America aboard the Monarch of the Sea. He arrived in the Salt Lake Valley on 23 September 1861 (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 111).

In 1880, Pauli accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 14 September 1880 and was assigned to labor in the Copenhagen Conference and the German part of Scandinavia. According to his biographical sketch, he served two missions at this time—one to Denmark and Hamburg, and the other to Austria and Denmark (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 111). He departed from Copenhagen on 17 October 1884 aboard the steamer Bravo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 283).

Returning to Utah, he pursued his interest in art. He painted over five hundred portraits. He also painted beautiful scenes for the temples in Utah. Family members recall that he traveled to California, Oregon, Washington, the eastern states, and British Columbia before his death (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 111). He died in 1929 in Salt Lake City at age ninety.

Andreas (Andrew) “P” Hansen

(Andreas Hansen)

1843–1908

Residence: Redmond, Sevier Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 5 November 1881

Missionary labors: Ålborg and Stockholm conferences

Departure date from Copenhagen: 15 June 1883

Name of departure ship: Pacific (Milo)

Birth date: 1 August 1843

Birthplace: Taapheden, Skæve, Hjørring, Denmark

Father: Andersen, Hans Frederik

Mother: Andersdatter, Elsie Marie

Spouse: Madsen, Gjertrude Kathrine

Marriage date: 20 September 1869

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Nielsen, Carolyn

Marriage date: 20 September 1869

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Pedersen, Karen

Marriage date: 16 August 1883

Death date: 1 September 1908

Death place: Independence, Madison Co., Idaho

Burial place: Burton Cemetery, Burton, Madison Co., Idaho

In 1862, Andreas and his brother journeyed to Stagsted to learn the shoemaker’s trade. It was in Stagsted that Andreas was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on 28 March 1864 by O. C. Overson. He served a local mission and on 6 September 1865 was set apart as a district president (see Christensen, “Andreas Hansen,” 1).

By 1865, he and paternal family members had immigrated to America. Accompanying them on the journey was his sweetheart, Carolyn Nielsen, who died from typhoid three days after they arrived in Salt Lake City (see Christensen, “Andreas Hansen,” 1).

When Andreas married Gjertrude, he was also sealed to Carolyn Nielsen. The family settled in Levan, Juab County. In that community, he worked as a shoemaker until moving to Ephraim, Sanpete County, and then to Redmond, Sevier County. When the Redmond Ward was organized in 1877, Andrew was sustained as second counselor to Bishop John Johnson (see Christensen, “Andreas Hansen,” 2–3).

He served in that capacity until 1881, when he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. Andreas arrived in Copenhagen on 5 November 1881 and was assigned to labor in the Ålborg Conference. He later presided over the Stockholm Conference. During this mission, his wife and mother died. He departed from Copenhagen on 15 June 1883 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 262, 264, 269).

Returning to Redmond, he remarried and was sustained as first counselor in the local bishopric. He is remembered in the community for helping build canals and bridges, and cultivating land. In fall 1898, he moved his family to Fremont County, Idaho. There he served in the bishopric of the Burton Ward until 1902, when he was ordained a bishop and called to serve in the Independence Ward (see Christensen, “Andreas Hansen,” 3–4).

He died in 1908, at age sixty-five, after being bedridden for nearly a year. At his funeral, it was said that Andreas had a jovial nature and loved a good joke (see Christensen, “Andreas Hansen,” 5).


Andrew Hansen

(Anders Haolnsen)

1845–1925

Residence: Pleasant Grove, Utah Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 28 September 1890

Missionary labors: Ålborg and Copenhagen conferences

Departure date from Copenhagen: 9 June 1892

Name of departure ship: Volo

Birth date: 14 March 1845

Birthplace: Stenløse, Frederiksborg, Denmark

Father: Andersen, Hans

Mother: Madsdatter, Karen

Spouse: Poulsen, Ane Kathrine (Katrine, Catherine)

Marriage date: 2 April 1866

Marriage place: Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark

Death date: 6 January 1925

Death place: Pleasant Grove, Utah Co., Utah

Burial place: Pleasant Grove, Utah Co., Utah

On 4 October 1864, Anders joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Denmark. He served as a local missionary before immigrating to America in 1866. He settled in Pleasant Grove, Utah County, Utah, until 1890 when he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 28 September 1890 and was assigned to labor in the Ålborg and Copenhagen conferences. After completing an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 9 June 1892 aboard the steamer Volo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 316–17, 326).

Although he returned to Pleasant Grove, by 1899 he had moved his family to Canada. After eighteen years of Canadian residency, he returned to Pleasant Grove, where he died in 1925 at his home at age seventy-nine. His funeral was held in the Pleasant Grove Tabernacle (see “Pleasant Grove Settler of 1866 Called by Death,” Deseret News, 8 January 1925).


Andrew J. Hansen

(Andre Janus Christian Hansen)

1852–1932

Residence: Big Cottonwood, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 6 November 1882

Missionary labors: Århus Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 25 August 1884

Name of departure ship: Panther

Birth date: 6 August 1852

Birthplace: Holstebrok, Ringkøbing, Denmark

Father: Hansen, Andre Janus Christian

Mother: Andersdatter, Else (Marie) Margarethe

Spouse: Anderson, Bengta

Marriage date: 4 March 1872

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Pedersen, Caroline Christiansen

Marriage date: 24 July 1878

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Christensen, Else Marie

Marriage date: 28 April 1886

Marriage place: St. George, Washington Co., Utah

Spouse: Frost, Hansine Marie Jensen

Marriage date: 27 November 1887

Marriage place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Death date: 4 November 1932

Death place: Rexburg, Madison Co., Idaho

Burial place: Rexburg, Madison Co., Idaho

Andrew never knew his father because his parents never married each other. His father was a soldier, weaver, and adventurer, who had met his mother and later left, never to be heard of again. Andrew grew up in a poverty-stricken home with three half-brothers and one half-sister. His birth was unwelcome. His mother was unable to obtain employment, and the family struggled with starvation. She placed her children with acquaintances and went to a large estate to obtain employment. She was there for one year when a milk barrel or vat fell on her and she became lame and could not work. She then found work as a “dry nurse” until her services were not longer needed. She was never heard from again.

Andrew was raised by his mother’s first husband’s sister and his maternal grandmother until he was two years old. At that point, he became a charge of the state. Each year he was leased out to the lowest bidder. In his autobiography, he states, “I lived with drunkards, it is all the greater wonder that I did not, even as a child, become a drunkard. Of course I attribute this to the goodness of God, He who saved my life at the time of drowning, who had healed my lungs, and in fact sustained me as a child under the most adverse circumstances” (Hansen, “Autobiography of Andrew Janus Hansen, 1852–1932,” 9–11).

In 1867, he met a family that was Mormon. He thought that he would be able to help these poor deluded people to see the truth. Instead, he started thinking about what they had said. When he was tending the cattle, he stated, “I heard an unmistakable voice say that Mormonism was true and I was to ally myself with that hated and despised people and the Lord would preserve and bless and prosper me for doing so.” He felt a love and joy that he had never before experienced (see Hansen, “Autobiography of Andrew Janus Hansen, 1852–1932,” 34–35).

Andrew was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on 28 September 1868 by Laurits Larsen. He immigrated to Utah with the family that introduced him to the gospel and arrived in Ogden on 6 August 1869. He filled a mission to Nebraska in 1878–79 (see Hansen, “Autobiography of Andrew Janus Hansen, 1852–1932,” 35).

Andrew received his endowment on 29 September 1870 in the Endowment House. Shortly after his marriage in 1872, he and his wife lived with his wife’s parents. He was employed at the mines in Alta, Little Cottonwood Canyon, Salt Lake County, Utah (see Hansen, “Autobiography of Andrew Janus Hansen, 1852–1932,” 54).

Andrew was ordained a seventy on 6 August 1876. He entered into plural marriage on 25 July 1878 when he married Caroline Christensen. At the fall conference of that year, he was called to go on a mission to the northern states. Because of financial circumstances, he did not leave with the Michigan company and was reassigned to the Nebraska Mission. He left on 29 November 1878. He returned home in June 1879 (see Hansen, “Autobiography of Andrew Janus Hansen, 1852–1932,” 60).

On 15 October 1882, Andrew was set apart to serve a mission in Scandinavia. He was a member of the Big Cottonwood Ward at the time. He arrived in Copenhagen on 6 November 1882 and was assigned to labor in the Århus Conference and became president of that conference. He suffered from stomach trouble and departed from Copenhagen on 25 August 1884 aboard the steamer Panther (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 267–68, 279). Upon his return, he was called as president of the YMMIA of the Big Cottonwood Ward.

In 1897, he was a member of the first Utah Legislature representing Garfield County. He served as a bishop of the Tropic Ward, Panguitch Stake, from 1895 to 1900. He was ordained as a patriarch in August 1900. He was elected president of the town of Tropic on 3 November 1903 (see Hansen, “Autobiography of Andrew Janus Hansen, 1852–1932,” 151).

In the 1910 US Census, Andrew was recorded as living in Salem, Fremont County, Idaho, with his wife Mary. In the 1920 US Census, he was living in Rexburg, Madison County, Idaho. His occupation was listed as a probate judge of Madison County, and he served at least five terms in that position. He died in Rexburg on 4 November 1932.

Carl Keilgaard Hansen

1833–1920

Residence: Fairview, Utah Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 9 December 1887

Missionary labors: Ålborg Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 17 October 1889

Name of departure ship: Cameo

Birth date: 15 September 1833

Birthplace: Frederikshavn, Hjørring, Denmark

Father: Hansen, Peder

Mother: Christensdatter (Lonstrup), Christiane

Spouse: Andersen, Caroline Martine

Marriage date: 14 December 1860

Marriage place: Denmark

Spouse: Rasmussen, Karen

Marriage date: 7 April 1867

Marriage place: Denmark

Death date: 25 March 1920

Death place: Fairview, Utah Co., Utah

Carl learned the trade of shoemaking from his father (History of Sanpete and Emery Counties, Utah, 368). By 1851, he was practicing his trade in Ålborg. In 1856, he enlisted as a soldier in the Danish military. On 1 December 1861, he and his wife were baptized members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Randers by Peter Larsen. Following his baptism, Carl was sustained as secretary of the local conference and assigned to labor in the Randers Branch. He served in the branch until 1864 when he was called to preside over the Århus Branch (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 111).

In 1867, he immigrated to America aboard the Manhattan and crossed the plains with the Leonard G. Rice Independent Company, arriving on 5 October 1867 in the Salt Lake Valley (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 111). He and his family settled in Fort Fairview, Sanpete County. In that community, Carl distinguished himself by fighting in the Black Hawk War, serving as city treasurer, school trustee, and as secretary and superintendent of the Sunday School (see History of Sanpete and Emery Counties, Utah, 368).

In 1887, he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 9 December 1887 and was assigned to preside over the Ålborg Conference (see History of Sanpete and Emery Counties, Utah, 268). After serving an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 17 October 1889 aboard the steamer Cameo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 304–5, 310).

Returning to Fairview, he accepted employment in a co-op store, serving as secretary of the United Order. When the United Order dissolved, Carl temporarily opened his own store. The store was later sold so that he could return to farming (see History of Sanpete and Emery Counties, Utah, 368).

He and his wife performed proxy ordinances in the Manti Temple for one thousand one hundred deceased persons in three years (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 2:576). Carl died in 1920 in Fairview at age eighty-six.


Christian Hansen

1820–1905

Residence: Brigham City, Box Elder Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 7 December 1881

Missionary labors: Copenhagen Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 28 August 1882

Name of departure ship: Argo

Birth date: 15 January 1820

Birthplace: Skuldelev, Frederiksborg, Denmark

Father: Rasmussen, Hans

Mother: Simonsdatter, Anne Sophia

Spouse: Ericksen, Elizabeth

Marriage date: 1 November 1850

Marriage place: Tærnby, Copenhagen, Denmark

Spouse: Hansen, Hansine Christine

Marriage date: 31 March 1857

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Olsen, Maria Christena

Marriage date: 1 November 1869

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 26 June 1905

Death place: Brigham City, Box Elder Co., Utah

Burial place: Brigham City, Box Elder Co., Utah

In 1842, Christian was a soldier in the Danish military. He fought in the war with Germany from 1848 to 1850. He also served for four years as a member of the king’s life guard. He was employed as a coachman for a wealthy man after the war. While in this employ, he first listened to Mormon missionaries. He and his wife were baptized on 8 April 1853 into The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints by C. C. A. Christensen. They immigrated to America the next year. Christian estimated that their journey from Denmark to Salt Lake City took nine months and thirteen days. His wife Elizabeth gave birth to a daughter two days before they reached the valley (see Davis, “A Sketch of the Life of Christian Hansen,” 1–2).

By 1855, he and his family had settled in Brigham City, Box Elder County, Utah. In 1871, he started a co-op dairy—the first dairy in Brigham City (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 112). The dairy became a huge undertaking with as many as six hundred cows. In 1877, Christian’s dairy produced fifty thousand pounds of cheese. Cheese from his dairy received gold medals at the World’s Fair in Chicago (see Davis, “A Sketch of the Life of Christian Hansen,” 4).

In 1881, Christian accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 7 December 1881 and was assigned to labor in the Copenhagen Conference. He was released from his missionary assignments after ten months due to poor health (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 112). He departed from Copenhagen on 28 August 1882 aboard the steamer Argo (see Hansen, “A Sketch of the Life of Christian Hansen,” 4; Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 262, 264–65). He died in 1905 in Brigham City at age eighty-five.


Christian Hansen

1846–1918

Residence: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 12 November 1892

Missionary labors: Ålborg Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 5 October 1893

Birth date: 30 August 1846

Birthplace: Kjersgarrd, Skæve, Hjørring, Denmark

Father: Pedersen, Hans

Mother: Christensdatter, Dorthea Christine

Spouse: Johannesen, Else Maria

Marriage date: 18 February 1866

Marriage place: Skæve, Hjørring, Denmark

Death date: 24 February 1918

Death place: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

In 1866, Christian was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Denmark. That same year, he and his wife immigrated to America. They crossed the plains in the Captain Abner Lowry ox-team company (see History of Sanpete and Emery Counties, Utah, 313).

Christian and his wife settled in Ephraim, Sanpete County, Utah. In that community, he fought in the Black Hawk War and battled grasshoppers for six weeks in what became known as the “Grasshopper War” (see History of Sanpete and Emery Counties, Utah, 313).

In 1892, he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He left his family, a forty-acre farm, and a house in Ephraim to serve the Lord. He arrived in Copenhagen on 12 November 1892 and was assigned to labor in the Ålborg Conference. After serving an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 5 October 1893 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 328–29, 333). He died in 1918 in Ephraim at age seventy-one.


Christian Loeg Hansen

(Christen Hansen)

1820–1904

Residence: Gunnison, Sanpete Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 30 September 1879

Missionary labors: Ålborg Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 5 July 1880

Name of departure ship: Cato

Birth date: 26 December 1820

Birthplace: Vennebjerg, Hjørring, Denmark

Father: Christensen, Hans

Mother: Andresdatter, Kirstine

Spouse: Christensen, Karen Maria (Maren)

Marriage date: 14 November 1878

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Jensen, Lovisa Catherine

Marriage date: 3 November 1870

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 14 October 1924

Death place: Centerfield, Sanpete Co., Utah

Christian was baptized on 7 July 1853. He immigrated in about 1859 and became a member of the Gunnison Ward, Sanpete County, Utah in April of 1861 (see Gunnison Ward Records, FHL #0025977–79). He was a veteran of the Black Hawk War and resident of Gunnison when he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1879. He arrived in Copenhagen on 30 September 1879 and was assigned to labor in the Ålborg Conference. After serving an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 5 July 1880 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 238–39, 244).

In 1897, the Hansen family became members of the Centerfield Ward. Christian, a farmer, died in 1924 in Centerfield, Sanpete County, at age eighty-three.

Hans Andreas Hansen

1836–1907

Residence: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 15 November 1881

Missionary labors: Christiania Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 24 August 1883

Name of departure ship: Bravo

Birth date: 2 March 1836

Birthplace: Ulefoss, Holla, Telemark, Norway

Father: Thorstensen, Hans

Mother: Johansdatter, Johanne

Spouse: Salvesen, Annie Thomine

Marriage date: 9 April 1866

Marriage place: Norway

Spouse: Johnson, Olava

Marriage date: 14 December 1879

Marriage place: Logan, Cache, Utah

Death date: 11 September 1907

Death place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Burial place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

On 11 April 1857, Hans was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Norway. In 1858, he served a local mission to Brevik, Porsgrunn, Skien, Larvik, and other places in Telemark County. By 1859, he was presiding over a small branch in Kristiansand (Vest-Agder County). During these missionary years, he was persecuted for his beliefs (see Lund, Scandinavia Jubilee Album, 113).

In 1866, he and his wife, Annie, emigrated from Norway to America. They settled in Logan, Cache County, Utah. During their years in Logan, Hans was an active member of the Church and accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1881. He arrived in Copenhagen on 15 November 1881 and was assigned to preside over the Christiania Conference. After completing an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 24 August 1883 aboard the steamer Bravo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 262, 264, 270).

Returning to Utah, he was called to be second counselor to Bishop A. L. Skanchy in Logan. He is remembered for working six months on the Salt Lake Temple (see Lund, Scandinavia Jubilee Album, 113). He died in 1907 in Logan at age seventy-one.


Hans Christian Hansen Sr.

1834–1919

Residence: Gunnison, Sanpete Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 5 November 1881

Missionary labors: Copenhagen Conference
Departure date from Copenhagen: 6 April 1883

Name of departure ship: Cato

Birth date: 13 December 1834

Birthplace: Thisted, Thisted, Denmark

Father: Hansen, Neils Christian

Mother: Lundorph, Ane Jensdatter

Spouse: Jorgensen, Anne Margrethe

Marriage date: 17 March 1864

Marriage place: Gunnison, Sanpete Co., Utah

Spouse: Christiansen, Julianne Willumsen

Marriage date: after 1883

Marriage place: Gunnison Sanpete Co., Utah

Death date: 1 September 1919

Death place: Fairview, Sanpete Co., Utah

Burial place: Fairview, Sanpete Co., Utah

Hans was living in Gunnison, Sanpete County, Utah, when he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 5 November 1881 and was assigned to labor in the Copenhagen Conference. After serving an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 6 April 1883 aboard the steamer Cato (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 262, 264, 269).

Upon returning to Gunnison, he married a recent convert, Julianne Christiansen, in plural marriage. They had one daughter, Marie, before they divorced. Hans died in 1919 at Fairview, Sanpete County, at age eighty-four.


Hans Christian Nielsen Hansen

(Hans Christen Nielsen)

1840–1907=

Residence: Preston, Franklin Co., Idaho

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 16 November 1886

Missionary labors: Copenhagen Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 27 September 1888

Birth date: 27 June 1840

Birthplace: Akselholm, Holmstrup, Holbæk, Denmark

Father: Hansen, Niels

Mother: Andersdatter, Hanne Magretha

Spouse: Petersen, Karen Marie

Marriage date: 13 December 1863

Marriage place: Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark

Spouse: Pond, Anna Regina Swensen Jacobsen Christiansen

Marriage date: 24 January 1880

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Hansen, Orilie Christine

Marriage date: 10 August 1882 (later divorced)

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Jorgensen, Hansene

Marriage date: 19 December 1888

Marriage place: Manti, Sanpete Co., Utah

Spouse: Jorgensen Maren

Marriage date: 20 December 1888

Marriage place: Manti, Sanpete Co., Utah

Death date: 5 September 1907

Death place: Abraham, Millard Co., Utah

Burial place: Riverton, Salt Lake Co., Utah

When Hans was eight years old, his mother died. At age fourteen, he was confirmed a member of the Lutheran Church. Six years later, he became a licensed master carpenter in Sjælland before moving to Copenhagen (see Watkins, “History of Hans Christian Nielsen Hansen,” 1–2).

In Copenhagen, he learned about the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints from his brother. He was baptized on 15 June 1868 by William Floyd. In 1872, he was ordained a teacher and a priest and one year later an elder. Hans labored faithfully in the Copenhagen Branch, serving as vice president, book agent, and bookkeeper (see Watkins, “History of Hans Christian Nielsen Hansen,” 1–2).

In 1874, R. C. Carstensen prophesied that “a gentile should pay” for him to immigrate to Utah. The prophecy was fulfilled, not only for Hans, but for his wife and their five children. In June 1874, they sailed from Copenhagen to Hull, England. During their voyage, a storm threatened the lives of those aboard. Many claimed it was an answer to Hans’s prayer to calm the seas that spared their lives. The remainder of their voyage was uneventful (see Watkins, “History of Hans Christian Nielsen Hansen,” 2).

The family settled temporarily in Ogden, Weber County, Utah, before moving to Newton, Cache County. In 1875, Hans was set apart as president of a Scandinavian branch of the Newton area. He was also called to be second counselor to Bishop Rigby in the United Order (see Watkins, “History of Hans Christian Nielsen Hansen,” 3).

He is remembered for supervising the construction of the stairs in the Salt Lake, Logan, and St. George temples. Despite the excellence of his carpentry skills, he had difficulty making a living for himself and his family. Family members recall that he was too kind to pursue those who owed him money for his workmanship (see Watkins, “History of Hans Christian Nielsen Hansen,” 3).

Hans and his family were residing in Clarkston, Cache County, in the mid-1870s. There he became a popular speaker, “hold[ing] the interest of an audience for two or three hours.” He enjoyed singing in Danish choirs and playing the harmonica (see Watkins, “History of Hans Christian Nielsen Hansen,” 3).

In June 1880, Hans married his first plural wife. Polygamy proved difficult for him and his family. The reasons for the difficulties were: the inability of Hans to provide for so many family members and bitter feelings between his wives (see Watkins, “History of Hans Christian Nielsen Hansen,” 4–5).

He was living in Preston, Franklin County, Idaho, when he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 16 November 1886, during a time when persecution against Mormon missionaries had elements of government sanction. He was assigned to labor in the Copenhagen Conference. In spite of the persecution in that conference, Hans baptized twenty-one Danes and served for two weeks as the mission president. He departed from Copenhagen on 27 September 1888 (Watkins, “History of Hans Christian Nielsen Hansen,” 6; Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 299–300).

Returning to Utah, Hans married two sisters whom he had baptized in Denmark. By 1889, he had contracted typhoid fever. This illness proved devastating to him and his family for he never regained his health. Although he continued to build, he suffered greatly. By 1905, a stroke paralyzed his right side, and by 1906 another stroke rendered him completely helpless, childish, and paralyzed. He was confined to bed (see Watkins, “History of Hans Christian Nielsen Hansen,” 5–6, 9). Hans died in 1907 in Abraham, Millard County, Utah, at age sixty-seven.

A daughter remembered him as a “wonderful, kind and loving father” who was never angry
with his children. She also recalled that Hans was affectionately called “Red Beard” by his loved ones and friends because of his red hair and beard (see Watkins, “History of Hans Christian Nielsen Hansen,” 4, 9).

Hans Christian Hansen

1854–1914

Residence: Mink Creek, Franklin Co., Idaho

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 18 September 1891

Missionary labors: Århus Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 6 July 1893

Name of departure ship: Bravo

Birth date: 2 January 1854

Birthplace: Vester Lunde, Lunde, Odense, Denmark

Father: Hansen, Hans

Mother: Christensdatter, Abelone

Spouse: Hansen, Gertrude Marie

Marriage date: spring 1879

Marriage place: Denmark

Death date: 14 August 1914

Death place: Mink Creek, Franklin Co., Idaho

Burial place: Mink Creek Cemetery, Mink Creek, Franklin Co., Idaho

While working as a guard for the king of Denmark, Hans met and married Gertrude Hansen, a member of the Mormon faith. Hans was baptized on 10 June 1879 by George Frandsen. They immigrated to America and resided in Bear River City, Box Elder County, Utah, until 1882, and in Logan, Cache County, until 1885 (see White, “Biography of Hans C. Hansen, 1).

In spring 1885, Hans and his family moved to Mink Creek, Franklin County, Idaho, where they homesteaded, living in a one-room log cabin until they were able to build a two-room house. Hans worked as a mail carrier from Mink Creek to Preston, Franklin County, for two years (see White, “Biography of Hans C. Hansen, 2–3).

He accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1891. He arrived in Copenhagen on 18 September 1891 and was assigned to labor in the Århus Conference. In that conference, he taught the gospel to his own relatives and those of his wife. He also gathered much genealogical information. He labored principally in the Odense and Esbjerg (Ribe County) branches before being sent to northern Germany to labor in Haderslev, Schleswig. When he was banished by the government in Schleswig for preaching Mormonism, he returned to Denmark (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:443). After serving an honorable mission, Hans departed from Copenhagen on 6 July 1893 aboard the steamer Bravo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 374–75, 402, 405).

After he returned to Idaho, Hans served for several years as a home missionary in the Franklin Stake and as president of the Scandinavian meetings and the YMMIA in Mink Creek. He served his community as a supervisor of roads, a school trustee, a farmer, a horticulturist, and a stockraiser (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:443). Hans died from cancer in 1914 at Mink Creek at age sixty. His family believed that the cancer was precipitated by a dog bite on his leg that failed to heal properly (see White, “Biography of Hans C. Hansen,” 4).


Hans Olin Hansen

1835–1920

Residence: Hyrum, Cache Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 15 November 1881

Missionary labors: Christiania Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 15 June 1883

Name of departure ship: Pacific (Milo)

Birth date: 9 October 1835

Birthplace: Slarød, Tune, Østfold, Norway

Father: Hendricksen, Hans

Mother: Jacobsdatter, Oleane Maria

Spouse: Cockshott, Mary Alice

Marriage date: 8 January 1858

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 5 October 1920

Death place: Hyrum, Cache Co., Utah

Burial place: Hyrum, Cache Co., Utah

Hans was the seventh child in a family of eight. He was reared in a happy home in which family members enjoyed attending the theater and entertaining others with old folk songs and dances of Norway. He, along with the other children in the family, was taught to perform and became recognized for his talents (see Watterson, “Hans Olin Hansen, 1835–1920,” 1).

Hans attended public schools until age fifteen when he went to sea to become a sailor. He liked the long stays on sailing vessels and also the opportunity of returning home when the vessels docked. On one occasion, he encountered Mormon missionaries. Although he was only eighteen years old, he was deeply impressed by the story of Joseph Smith and about Zion being established in America (see Watterson, “Hans Olin Hansen, 1835–1920,” 2).

He joined with Mormonism and along with his mother and two sisters, set sail for America on 31 December 1853. They arrived safely in the New York Harbor and journeyed across the plains in the Peter Olsen company. On the trek across the plains, Hans’s mother died. Her body was wrapped in a patch quilt she had made in Norway. Hans and his sisters reached the Salt Lake Valley in August 1855. Although he knew of the difficulty of the journey, Hans returned across the plains to help other immigrants reach the valley (see Watterson, “Hans Olin Hansen, 1835–1920,” 2).

In 1858, Hans married Mary Cockshott, a young English woman, who had helped him learn English. In 1859, he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia, where he served for a year and a half. There he was successful in settling an estate for his former employer, Hans Jorgen Johnson, and in organizing a missionary singing group. He, with two young men he hired, sang hymns at street meetings. Their singing attracted large crowds. Hans departed from Copenhagen on 9 May 1861 aboard the steamer Waldemar (see Carter, Our Pioneer Heritage, 5:41; “Hans Olin Hansen, 1835–1920,” 3).

After returning to Utah, Hans moved his family to Salt Lake City. In the city, he opened a freighting business. He bought and sold produce and hauled freight to and from the East. His freighting business grew and prospered for sometime but as the railroads moved West, the demand for his freight wagons ceased. Rather than maintain an old pattern, he joined with the railroad movement and did railroad contracting by grading land in six western states (see Watterson, “Hans Olin Hansen, 1835–1920,” 4).

In 1866, Hans moved his family to Hyrum, Cache County, Utah, settling on the southwest corner of Third South and Center Street. He resumed his contracting business which provided employment for many young men in the community. Hans also took an active part in the development of the community by providing funds for entertainment. He was known as generous with his investments (see Watterson, “Hans Olin Hansen, 1835–1920,” 5).

In 1881, he accepted another mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 15 November 1881 and was assigned to labor in the Christiania Conference. During this mission, he financially helped some of his converts immigrate to America. Hans departed from Copenhagen on 15 June 1883 (see Watterson, “Hans Olin Hansen, 1835–1920,” 5–6; Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 153–55, 262, 264, 269).

Returning to Hyrum, he resumed his contracting work for the railroad. He also heavily invested in horses. In 1901, five hundred of his horses contracted a glandular disease and died. With the loss of his horses, his career and prosperity ended. The large home in Hyrum was traded for a smaller one (see Watterson, “Hans Olin Hansen, 1835–1920,” 7).

Hans suffered a stroke in 1918 that left him almost blind and paralyzed in one arm. Despite these afflictions, each day he walked through the town with his big dog, Ben. He died in 1920 in Hyrum at age eighty-four, after walking to the Hyrum City post office, where he suffered another stroke. His daughter remembers him as kind, affectionate, and witty. “Father was a busy man and worked hard at everything he did. He never left a job unfinished,” she wrote (Watterson, “Hans Olin Hansen, 1835–1920,” 7–8).


Hemming Hansen

1848–1933

Residence: Spring City, Sanpete Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 1 December 1885

Missionary labors: Copenhagen Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 18 August 1887

Name of departure ship: Bravo

Birth date: 25 March 1848

Birthplace: Damme, Fanefjord, Præstø, Denmark

Father: Hansen, Jørgen

Mother: Hansdatter, Anne Kirstine

Spouse: Mikkelsen (Olsen), Anna Maria

Marriage date: 7 November 1870

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 5 June 1933

Death place: Spring City, Sanpete Co., Utah

Hemming and his parents immigrated to America in 1859 and settled in the Mill Creek-Cottonwood area, south of Salt Lake City. He enlisted in the guard unit of the territorial militia and fought in battles with Indians. When he wasn’t battling Indians, he worked as a freighter until the late 1860s when he moved to Spring City, Sanpete County (see Hansen, “Biography of Hemming Hansen,” 77–80).

In 1885, Hemming responded to a mission call to return to Scandinavia. To raise needed funds for the mission, he sold everything he could. His wealthy brother, Hans, said he was a fool to leave his family in such poverty, but he ignored his advice. Later, when Hemming was in Salt Lake City preparing to leave for Scandinavia, he spoke with Hans again. This time his brother said, “Well, it looks like you are going if you have to walk, so here is $100 so you can go like a gentleman.” Hemming paid the money back soon after he returned from the mission (see Hansen, “Biography of Hemming Hansen,” 80).

His journey to Denmark was difficult, lonely, and dangerous. When his ship docked in Liverpool, Hemming got off to mail a letter home. Returning after dark, he fell off the cargo plank and nearly drowned. After rescuing him, the steward refused to find him dry clothes when he learned that he was a Mormon missionary (see Hansen, “Biography of Hemming Hansen,” 80).

When he finally arrived in Copenhagen on 1 December 1885, he was assigned to labor in the Copenhagen Conference. At that time, Latter-day Saint missionaries were being banished from the country, but Hemming’s uncle, a member of parliament, prevented this from happening to him—not for love of the Church but because Hemming had been born on Danish soil and was a citizen. Due to the widespread banishment of Mormon missionaries, he often served without a companion. He departed from Denmark on 18 August 1887 aboard the steamer Bravo before completing his mission due to poor health (see Hansen, “Biography of Hemming Hansen,” 81; Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 294–95, 303).

Returning to Utah, Hemming bought some land and grew trees for lumber. Later he homesteaded the land to keep from losing it. He farmed the land, raised grain, and sold milk for a living. He served as a home missionary, a ward teacher, and was in the presidency of the local YMMIA. He was also a justice of the peace. In his later years, he was an avid vegetable and flower gardener, winning prizes at the county fair for his efforts. He is remembered for his love of books (see Hansen, “Biography of Hemming Hansen,” 81). He died in 1933 at Spring City at age eighty-five.

Jacob Hansen

1842–1913

Residence: Bear River City, Box Elder Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 11 November 1879, 23 November 1886

Missionary labors: Copenhagen Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 20 June 1881, 23 August 1888

Name of departure ship: Hero; Name not listed

Birth date: 21 November 1842

Birthplace: Klovtofte, Høje-Tåstrup, Copenhagen, Denmark

Father: Pedersen, Hans

Mother: Jacobsdatter, Johanne

Spouse: Andersen, Karen

Marriage date: 2 October 1871

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Leutz, Karen Isadora

Marriage date: 24 November 1881

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Hansen, Maren

Marriage date: 14 February 1884

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 5 August 1913

Death place: Bear River City, Box Elder Co., Utah

Burial place: Bear River City, Box Elder Co., Utah

Jacob joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on 2 July 1866 and immigrated to America the following year. He and his family arrived in the Salt Lake Valley on 5 October 1867, and accepted a settling mission call to Bear River City, Box Elder County, Utah (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 114).

In 1879, Jacob accepted a mission call to Denmark. He presided over the Øernes Branch until 1881. He was home only five years before accepting a second mission call to Scandinavia in 1886. He arrived in Copenhagen on 23 November 1886 and was assigned to labor in the Copenhagen Conference. He served in the area where he had grown to manhood. He taught many of his friends and relatives the gospel. From April 1887 to September 1888, he presided over the local Latter-day Saint branch in the area. He departed from Copenhagen on 23 August 1888. By October 1888, he had returned to his home in Utah (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 114; Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 238–39, 255, 299–300, 305).

Jacob served as a bishop’s counselor for many years in the Bear River City Ward. He was active in business affairs in the community even though he suffered much from stomach troubles. He is remembered as sharing with ward members and neighbors his violin talent (see Carter, Our Pioneer Heritage, 19:456). He died in 1913 at his home in Bear River City at age seventy-one (see “Jacob Hansen Dies at Age 71,” Box Elder Journal, 7 August 1913).


James Hansen, Jr.

1861–1914

Residence: Brigham City, Box Elder Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 16 September 1887

Missionary labors: Copenhagen Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 30 May 1889

Name of departure ship: Milo

Birth date: 18 October 1861

Birthplace: Brigham City, Box Elder Co., Utah

Father: Hansen, James Peter Jensen

Mother: Stephansen, Karen Margrethe

Spouse: Welch, Annie

Marriage date: 25 October 1883

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 21 June 1914
Death place: Georgetown, Bear Lake Co., Utah

Burial place: Georgetown, Bear Lake Co., Utah

His mother died when she was thirty years old. After her death, James lived with other wives of his father. In his youth, he tended co-op cattle in Brigham City, Box Elder County, until contracting typhoid (see Butterfield, “In Grateful Remembrance of My Parents,” 37–40).

In 1887, he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. By shearing sheep, he managed to earn three hundred dollars, enough to pay for his mission (see Butterfield, “In Grateful Remembrance of My Parents,” 37–40). He arrived in Copenhagen on 16 September 1887 and was assigned to labor in the Copenhagen Conference. Much of his mission was spent on the Island of Bornholm (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 308). His biographer records that James had “many thrilling experiences while on this island.” He met his father’s relatives, including a wealthy aunt who promised him “wealth and position” if he would denounce his beliefs. He stayed in her mansion for some time but was not allowed to preach to her family or servants. However, he “contrived to tell her a good many things” about his faith (see Butterfield, “In Grateful Remembrance of My Parents,” 41).

While on this island, he was imprisoned and flogged with a strap that had a heavy buckle on it. In the History of the Scandinavian Mission, Andrew Jenson records the following account of his persecutions:

Elders James Hansen and Erastus C. Willardsen were on trial on the Island of Bornholm before the mayor of the city of Rønne, February 5, 1889. Elder Hansen had labored about sixteen months on the island and through his diligence made a number of converts. During his absence from the island . . . a Lutheran priest . . . published a scurrilous article . . . in which he slandered the Saints and their doctrines. As the success of the Elders had already caused uneasiness in certain circles, this article added additional fuel to the flames and excited the rude and somewhat ignorant populace. Consequently when [Elders Hansen and Willardson] arrived in Rønne and held a meeting, . . . a mob appeared (Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 308).

The next Sunday was peaceful, but the Sunday following “police officers arrived and broke up the meeting.” Jenson continues, “A certain man” who appeared to be their friend “invited the brethren to take supper with him, but the Elders were impressed not to accept the invitation.” Later they found out the man was part of the mob: “A dozen or more men of the mob had gathered to inflict bodily violence upon the brethren, should they put in an appearance. While the mob thus waited, . . . the brethren” were guided by the Spirit to choose another route “to reach a certain place previously selected, where they administered the holy ordinance of baptism to three persons. The mob next sought the brethren in an assembly hall, where angry men “gave vent to their hatred by breaking in the doors and some of the windows until they were at last dispersed by the . . . police.” The mayor advised the missionaries to leave the island, which they did in a few days, but not before baptizing four more persons. The following spring, James left Copenhagen along with a number of emigrating Latter-day Saints aboard the steamer Milo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 308).

A year after returning to Utah, James moved his family to Ogden, Weber County, where he worked at ZCMI until suffering an attack of acute appendicitis. After a long treatment and recovery in 1892, he moved his family back to Brigham City. In that community, he planted the first gooseberries, currants, and strawberries, all of which flourished—proving that these fruits thrived in high altitudes (see Butterfield, “In Grateful Remembrance of My Parents,” 43).

James’ daughter recalls that he was generous “to a fault,” a lover of music, and very sociable. He often invited travelers or converts to stay at his home for extended periods. He was also a
peacemaker who loved to bear testimony of his faith (Butterfield, “In Grateful Remembrance of My Parents,” 43). He died in 1914 in Georgetown, Bear Lake County, Idaho, at age fifty-two.


James Hans Hansen

(Jens Hansen)

1848–1929

Residence: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 5 November 1880

Missionary labors: Copenhagen Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 16 June 1882

Name of departure ship: Bravo

Birth date: 4 May 1848

Birthplace: Stensved, Ørslev, Præstø, Denmark

Father: Hansen, Hans

Mother: Andersdatter, Anne

Spouse: Olsen, Caroline Olevia

Marriage date: 22 November 1876

Marriage place: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

Death date: 29 March 1929

Death place: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

Burial place: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

When James was a small child, his parents joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and immigrated with their children to America aboard the vessel New Orleans. In 1853, they crossed the plains to reach the Salt Lake Valley. The family settled in Ephraim, Sanpete County. Their first years in the settlement were harsh because grasshoppers ate their crops. Without a harvest to sustain the family, James’s mother sold straw hats that she had woven with his help (see Paradise, “History of James Hans Hansen,” 1).

In 1865, when war broke out with the Indians, James was one of the first to enlist. Near that same time, he rode the Pony Express between Ephraim and Spring City. In 1866, he was called to return to the Missouri River to help Latter-day Saint settlers journey to Utah. Despite the dangers of this return, Elder Orson Hyde prophesied that if he were faithful, he would return home unharmed. Although cholera claimed the lives of a hundred Saints in the ox-team company, neither James nor his companions became ill (see Paradise, “History of James Hans Hansen,” 2–3).

In 1880, James accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 5 November 1880 and was assigned to labor in the Copenhagen Conference. He had a difficult time finding the mission office because no one would help him when they learned he was looking for Mormons. After praying for assistance, he was led to the post office, where he obtained the address of the mission office (see Hansen, “Missionary Journal of James Hans Hansen, 1880–1882”).

On this mission, he learned from a distant relative that an uncle lived nearby but that his uncle wouldn’t want to associate with him because of his faith. The next morning as James ventured toward the town of Næstved, he pled with the Lord for help in finding his uncle. As he was walking, a man driving a team passed him, then stopped and offered him a ride. To his surprise, this man was the uncle he was seeking. The uncle was glad to see James (see Hansen, “Missionary Journal of James Hans Hansen, 1880–1882”).

Finding the mission office and his uncle are just two of the incidents in his missionary journal that demonstrate “his constant reliance upon the Lord through prayer.” After two years of such faithful service, James departed from Copenhagen on 16 June 1882 (see correspondence from Doreen Kurr, 5 August 1999).

Returning to Utah, he served on the Ephraim City Council for eight years, taught Sunday School, and was an active politician. He followed the occupations of farming, stock raising, threshing, and railroad construction. He died of general debility in 1929 at Ephraim at age eighty (see Paradise, “History of James Hans Hansen,” 3).


James Peter Hansen

(Jens Hansen Jensen)

1827–96

Residence: Brigham City, Box Elder Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 1873

Missionary labors: Copenhagen Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 18 June 1874

Name of departure ship: Milo (Humber)

Birth date: 2 July 1827

Birthplace: Nybyvej, Aakirkeby, Bornholm, Denmark

Father: Mortensen, Jens

Mother: Hansdatter, Ellen Kjerstine

Spouse: Madsen, Annie Cathrine

Marriage date: 6 April 1851

Marriage place: Aaker, Bornholm, Denmark

Spouse: Steffänsen, Karen Margrethe

Marriage date: about 1859

Spouse: Bengtson, Botilda

Marriage date 28 March 1870

Spouse: Grumstrup (Nielsen), Margaret

Marriage date: 5 September 1870

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Larsen, Anne

Spouse: Peterson, Christina Rasmus

Marriage date: 12 November 1878

Death date: 19 July 1896

Death place: Brigham City, Box Elder Co., Utah

Burial place: Brigham City Cemetery, Brigham City, Box Elder Co., Utah

The parents of Jens were well-to-do landowners. They taught him to be an expert in finance. Before his baptism, he held the prestigious position of financier in the Muller Estate. Working at the estate was a peasant girl named Annie Madsen who did the weaving for the family. Jens and Annie were married. They joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saint on 15 January 1853 (see Prince, “The Life Story of James Hansen,” 1).

Jens served a local mission before he and his wife departed from Denmark on 3 January 1854 aboard the Jesse Munn with three hundred Scandinavians. After the ship docked in New Orleans, they took passage up the Mississippi River to Nebraska, where they joined an ox-team company to cross the plains. They arrived in the Salt Lake Valley on 5 October 1854. At this time, Jens Americanized his name to James (see Prince, “The Life Story of James Hansen,” 1–2).

At the request of Brigham Young, Jens and his wife settled at Fort Brigham City, Box Elder County. Due to the threat of the Utah war, he and his family moved to Lehi, Utah County, for a short time. After the threat passed, they returned to Brigham City. Elder Erastus Snow, aware of his generosity, promised Jens that neither he nor his children would ever go hungry (see Prince, “The Life Story of James Hansen,” pp. 2–3).

Jens accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1873. He labored in the Copenhagen Conference until his departure on 18 June 1874. Returning to Brigham City, he became a prominent businessman. His farm was adjacent to Lorenzo Snow’s. He regularly gave crops to others and at one point 1,500 sheep to the Church. He also gave the land to the Church on which the Brigham City Tabernacle was built. Due to persecution against plural marriage, Jens was imprisoned. He paid one hundred dollars in fines and served six months in the penitentiary. He was released on 13 August 1888 (see Spencer, “Jens Hansen, 1827–1896,” 4).

In 1894, he suffered from a stroke. At the advice of Lorenzo Snow, he went to the temple and received a blessing and his speech was restored. Two years later, he suffered another stroke that claimed his life. He died in 1896 at Brigham City at age sixty-nine. His biographer said of him, “He never ate his breakfast after the sun came up, signifying he was an early riser.” He also wrote, “He was a very stern but kind man” (Spencer, “Jens Hansen, 1827–1896,” 3–4).


Jens Hansen

1823–97

Residence: Spanish Fork, Utah Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 20 August 1865; 20 November 1878; 1886

Missionary labors: Copenhagen Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 13 June 1867; 3 August 1879; 1888

Name of departure ship: Albion

Birth date: 13 October 1823

Birthplace: Otterup, Otterup, Odense, Denmark

Father: Jørgensen, Hans

Mother: Pedersdatter, Maren Kerstine

Spouse: Christensen, Maren Katrine

Marriage date: 24 April 1853

Marriage place: Odense, Odense, Denmark

Spouse: Pederson, Karen Andersen

Marriage date: 11 November 1854

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Knudsen, Caroline Jorgensen

Marriage date: 3 February 1856

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Anderson, Karen

Marriage date: 20 December 1857

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Sorenson, Maren

Marriage date: 8 March 1862

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Larsen, Maren Katrine

Marriage date: January 1868

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Jacobsen, Maren Bishoff

Marriage date: 25 January 1868

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Hansen, Mettie Marie

Marriage date: 25 January 1868

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Johnson, Dorothea Christina

Marriage date: 5 April 1869

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Fredericksen, Karen

Marriage date: 5 April 1869

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Rasmussen, Mary Kristine

Marriage date: 4 November 1880

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Larsen, Camila

Marriage date: 4 November 1880

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Christensen, Martha

Marriage date: 2 April 1883

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Nielsen, Anna Elizabeth

Marriage date: 27 December 1883

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 28 June 1897

Death place: Spanish Fork, Utah Co., Utah

Burial place: Spanish Fork Cemetery, Spanish Fork, Utah Co., Utah

In 1846, Jens joined the Danish army and fought in the war with Germany. He was decorated for his courage. After the war ended in 1851, he worked in Copenhagen, where he met members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. The first missionary he met laid his hand on Jens’s wounded knee and immediately healed him. When praying for a testimony of the Mormon doctrine, he received a foreknowledge of the missionary work he would be called to do: “I heard a voice saying, ‘If thou wilt receive this doctrine, which is called Mormonism, thou shalt preach the Gospel to many people’” (Hansen, “Biography of Elder Jens Hansen,” 2).

He was baptized in August 1851. After his baptism, he had another spiritual experience that led him to missionary work. He recounts that while praying to be a laborer in the Lord’s vineyard, he was seized by the adversary that prevented him from further praying. After a “hard bodily struggle,” he conquered the evil and saw a vision of the Savior, who said, “Thy sins are forgiven thee and thy prayers granted. From now on thy labor shall be to bring Souls to God until I come.” Later Jens related this vision to Elder Erastus Snow, who “declared it was from the Lord” (Hansen, “Biography of Elder Jens Hansen,” 2).

In November 1851, he was called on a local mission. He preached to his own parents. They received him “with joy” and allowed him to hold meetings in their house. His father had long ago had a dream that Jens would be a savior to the family, although he had never understood the meaning of the dream. His parents and four of his brothers accepted baptism (see Hansen, “Biography of Elder Jens Hansen,” 2–3).

Others began to persecute him and his companion. One evening, a mob came to his father’s house threatening bodily harm. He and his companion hid in a ditch until dawn to escape harm. When the mob gave up trying to find them, they returned to the house feeling happy that they “were found worthy to be persecuted for Christ’s name sake” (Hansen, “Biography of Elder Jens Hansen,” 3).

Continuing his local missionary efforts, Jens organized and presided over the first branch on the Island of Fyen. He baptized many converts before he and his wife departed from Denmark bound for America in December 1853. Cholera broke out among the emigrants on the journey. Many died, including his wife (see Hansen, “Biography of Elder Jens Hansen,” 5).

Soon after arriving in the Salt Lake Valley, Jens married his brother’s widow. To earn a living, he threshed wheat but lacked success with his own farm for three years. In 1856, Jens married again. He eventually married twelve women. He and his families suffered from hunger during the cricket infestation of 1856, but their lives were spared. He took part in the Utah war in the winter of 1857–1858 before moving his families to Spanish Fork, Utah County. In this community, they prospered (see Hansen, “Biography of Elder Jens Hansen,” 6–7).

In 1865, Jens accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 20 August 1865 and was appointed to labor as a traveling elder on the Island of Fyen. In the course of this mission, he baptized a number of people and healed one girl of an illness by writing her a letter. He departed from Copenhagen on 13 June 1867 and returned to his family in October of that year (see Hansen, “Biography of Elder Jens Hansen,” 7).

In Spanish Fork, Jens was elected to public office and helped with several public works. Then in 1878, he was again called on a mission to Scandinavia. He accepted the call and left thirty-six family members in Spanish Fork. He arrived in Copenhagen on 20 November 1878 and was assigned to be a traveling elder in that community. When he learned that a son had died in his absence, he was released and returned home in 1879 (see Hansen, “Biography of Elder Jens Hansen,” 8).

This time he remained at home for six years before accepting another mission in 1886. On this mission, he labored in the Århus Conference. Two and a half years later, he sailed from Denmark, having spent a total of ten years on foreign missions (see Hansen, “Biography of Elder Jens Hansen,” 8).

In 1897, he was accidentally struck by a hay pole. He was unconscious for about a week. Among his last words to his grandsons were, “I am counting on you to take care of this work.” He died in 1897 in Spanish Fork at age seventy-three (see Hansen, “Biography of Elder Jens Hansen,” 12).


Jens Hansen

1837–1917

Residence: Mill Creek, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 16 May 1881

Missionary labors: Copenhagen Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 16 June 1882

Name of departure ship: Albano (Bravo)

Birth date: 15 March 1837

Birthplace: Løve, Gierslev, Holbæk, Denmark

Father: Jensen, Hans

Mother: Christensdatter, Margrethe

Spouse: Jørgensen, Bertha

Marriage date: 24 March 1862

Marriage place: Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark

Spouse: Henricksen, Kirsten

Marriage date: 4 June 1864

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 10 September 1917

Death place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Burial place: Salt Lake City Cemetery, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Jens was baptized in 1857 and served a local mission for four years. Just before he and his wife departed for America in 1862, his father-in-law gave them a $1,000 for their journey. With the money, he and his wife helped other Latter-day Saint emigrants pay for the ocean passage. Jens and his wife arrived in the Salt Lake Valley in September 1862 (see Fuller, “Jens Hansen,” 1).

After their arrival, Heber C. Kimball hired Jens to manage his flour mill in City Creek Canyon. While working at the mill, Elder Kimball told him “that he should take a second wife.” In 1864, Jens married Kirsten Henricksen who had been caring for some of the Kimball children (see Fuller, “Jens Hansen,” 1).

In 1867, Jens bought forty acres on Highland Drive in Salt Lake City. On this acreage, he planted fruit orchards and strawberries (see Fuller, “Jens Hansen,” 1).

Jens had resided in Salt Lake City for nearly sixteen years when he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 16 May 1881 and was assigned to labor in the Copenhagen Conference. While there, he taught his extended family the gospel. His mother and brother departed with him from Copenhagen on 16 June 1882 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 262–63, 265).

After returning to Salt Lake City, he served in a bishopric for sixteen years and as a president of a quorum of the Seventy for twenty years. He was the father of seventeen children (see Fuller, “Jens Hansen,” 1). He died in 1917 in Salt Lake City at age eighty.


Jens Nielsen Hansen

(Jens Nielsen)

1842–1906

Residence: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 28 September 1890

Missionary labors: Copenhagen Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 4 February 1892

Birth date: 16 June 1842

Birthplace: Akselholm, Holmstrup, Holbæk, Denmark

Father: Hansen, Niels

Mother: Andersdatter, Hanne Margrethe

Spouse: Christensen (Jensen), Karen Marie

Marriage date: 20 April 1867

Marriage place: Denmark

Spouse: Sorensen, Ane Margrethe

Marriage date: 15 November 1878

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Hansen, Orilie Christine

Marriage date: 10 August 1882

Death date: 13 January 1906

Death place: Newton, Cache Co., Utah

Burial place: Newton, Cache Co., Utah

When Jens was six years old, his mother died. Although her death was a tragedy in his young life, Jens proceeded to complete his public school education. He studied music for two years before entering the Danish military in 1864 (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:406–7).

On 20 April 1868, he was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. By 1872, he was presiding over a branch on the Island of Zealand (Sjælland) (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:406–07).

Three years later, he and his family moved to Utah, settling in Newton, Cache County. In 1878 and 1882, he entered polygamous relationships. He was arrested and imprisoned from 25 May 1889 to 24 August 1889 for unlawful cohabitation (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:406–7).

In 1890, while residing in Logan, Cache County, Jens accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 28 September 1890 and was assigned to labor in the Copenhagen Conference. After completing an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 4 February 1892 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 316).

After returning to Logan, he sang tenor in the town choir, served as a Sunday School teacher, a seventy, and a ward teacher. He also served as a school trustee, postmaster, vice president of an irrigation company, and on the town board (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:406–7). He died in 1906 at Newton at age sixty-three.


Jørgen Hansen

(Jørgen Pedersen)

1852–1935

Residence: Provo, Utah Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 4 May 1883

Missionary labors: Copenhagen Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 15 June 1885

Name of departure ship: Panther

Birth date: 1 August 1852

Birthplace: Havløkke, Østofte, Maribo, Denmark

Father: Hansen, Peder

Mother: Danielsdatter, Anne

Spouse: Nielsen, Caroline Marie

Marriage date: 13 May 1877

Marriage place: Provo, Utah Co., Utah

Spouse: Nielsen, Alma Nathalia (Wilson)

Marriage date: 9 October 1885

Marriage place: Logan Temple, Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Death date: 19 November 1935

Death place: Orem, Utah Co., Utah

Burial place: Provo City Cemetery, Provo, Utah Co., Utah

Of his initial acquaintance with Mormonism, Jørgen wrote, “My parents joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in April 1857. When they joined, my grandfather came with a mob of surrounding farmers to our house, threatening my father’s and mother’s lives if they did not renounce Mormonism and their Doctrine. They came six consecutive Sundays and cursed and swore and threatened all manner of things if my father was ever seen on his father’s farm again.” Their threats did not deter the family in their faith. Jørgen was baptized on 13 April 1865 by his father (see Hansen, “Personal History of Jørgen Hansen written by Himself,” 1).

He and his father left their native land and crossed the Atlantic in the sailing vessel Cavour in 1866. They crossed the plains in Abner Lowry’s company. Jørgen and his father arrived in the Salt Lake Valley in 1886 and settled in Provo, Utah County. They attended the Provo Second Ward. Jørgen obtained employment with Abraham O. Smoot as a laborer on the railroad (see Hansen, “Personal History of Jørgen Hansen Written by Himself,” 2–3).

He accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1883. He arrived in Copenhagen on 4 May 1883 and was assigned to labor in the Copenhagen Conference. For fifteen months, he served in the Southwest Sjælland Branch. For ten months, he presided over the Copenhagen Conference. On 15 June 1885, he departed from Copenhagen aboard the steamer Panther in charge of over five hundred emigrating Saints (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 115). After reaching English shores, he embarked from Liverpool aboard the Wisconsin (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 273, 275, 290).

After his return to Utah, Jørgen was ordained a high priest and called to serve as second counselor in the bishopric of the Provo Second Ward (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 115). During his service in the bishopric, he worked as a farmer, a fruit grower, and a county road supervisor (see Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, 915). From 1891 to 1893, he was the street supervisor of Provo. He served as deputy watermaster of Provo for four years, as a member of the Provo City Council, and as a justice of the peace for the Provo Bench Precinct for ten years. In his later years, he lived in the Timpanogos Ward on the Provo Bench (see Hansen, “Personal History of Jørgen Hansen written by Himself,” 2). He died in 1935 in Orem at age eighty-three.


Michael Abraham Hansen

(Michael Hansen)

1848–1907

Residence: Elsinore, Sevier Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 28 August 1889

Missionary labors: Århus Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 7 August 1890

Birth date: 11 April 1848

Birthplace: Skåde, Holme, Århus, Denmark

Father: Hansen, Hans

Mother: Michelsdatter, Anne Margrethe

Spouse: Jensen, Micheline Kelson

Marriage date: 2 November 1867

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 27 November 1907

Death place: Elsinore, Sevier Co., Utah

Burial place: Elsinore, Sevier Co., Utah

After his baptism, Michael served as president of the Frederikshavn (Hjørring County) and Ålborg branches of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints before immigrating to America.

Michael was a private in the Utah Territorial Militia Calvary and a participant in the Black Hawk War (tombstone of Michael A. Hansen, Elsinore Cemetery, Elsinore, Sevier County, Utah). He was an early settler of Elsinore, Sevier County, Utah (see “Michael A. Hansen Laid to Rest,” Deseret News, 4 December 1907).

While a resident of Elsinore, he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 28 August 1889 and was assigned to labor in the Århus Conference. After serving an honorable mission, he departed from Denmark on 7 August 1890 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 310–11, 315).

Michael died in 1907 at Elsinore at age fifty-nine. It was said of him that he “proved himself a worthy and respected citizen. He was a faithful member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints” (“Michael A. Hansen Laid to Rest,” Deseret News, 4 December 1907).


Ole Hansen

1816–99

Residence: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 3 June 1876

Missionary labors: Göteborg Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 24 June 1878

Name of departure ship: Cameo

Birth date: 22 July 1816

Birthplace: Bø, Efterlot, Buskerud, Norway

Father: Baltzersen, Hans

Mother: Olsdatter, Anne (Kristine)

Spouse: Hansen, Maren Eliassen

Marriage date: 13 July 1849

Marriage place: Sandsvær, Buskerud, Norway

Spouse: Amundsen, Berte Marie

Marriage date: 10 April 1862

Marriage place: Norway

Spouse: Johansen, Julia Teoa

Marriage date: 16 May 1866

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 23 February 1899

Death place: St. Charles, Bear Lake Co., Idaho

Burial place: St. Charles, Bear Lake Co., Idaho

The events leading up to Ole’s baptism were most unusual. Before his baptism, his wife and son died. After listening to the preaching of Mormon elders, he wondered if what they shared was true. It was his young daughter’s exclamation of the truthfulness of their message that led him to join the Church and immigrate to America with his family aboard the John J. Boyd in 1863. After crossing the plains to reach the Salt Lake Valley, Ole and his family settled temporarily in Cottonwood, Salt Lake County (see Matthews, History of Bear Lake Pioneers, 236; “Hansen,” Deseret News, 9 March 1899).

They then moved to St. Charles, Bear Lake County, Idaho, where they experienced difficult days. Nevertheless, Ole distinguished himself in the community by building canals and public enterprises. Family members recall that whenever he was going places, he wore his best clothes—including his hat and gloves. He walked with a cane (see Matthews, History of Bear Lake Pioneers, 236; “Hansen,” Deseret News, 9 March 1899).

By 1876, he and his family moved from St. Charles to Logan, Cache County, Utah. While residing in that community, Ole accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 3 June 1876 and was assigned to labor in the Göteborg Conference. After completing this mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 24 June 1878 aboard the steamer Cameo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 226, 232).

Returning to Utah, Ole was arrested on 4 April 1887 for unlawful cohabitation. After serving a prison sentence, he was released. He then served as secretary of Deer Park’s canal system. He died of paralysis and old age in 1899 at St. Charles at age eighty-two (see “Hansen,” Deseret News, 9 March 1899).


Ole Hansen

1825–1908

Residence: Smithfield, Cache Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 7 November 1883

Missionary labors: Århus Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 15 June 1885

Name of departure ship: Panther

Birth date: 26 September 1825

Birthplace: Vesterlunde, Lunde, Odense, Denmark

Father: Henriksen, Hans

Mother: Olesdatter, Maren

Spouse: Hansen (Nielsen), Marie

Marriage date: 9 September 1854

Marriage place: Odense, Odense, Denmark

Spouse: Nielsen, Anna Madeline

Death date: 16 September 1908

Death place: Smithfield, Cache Co., Utah

As a youth, Ole did farm work for neighboring landlords until being drafted into the military at age twenty-one. In the 1848 Danish war with Germany, he was wounded in his leg. He recovered from the wound, and married in 1854. He and his wife resided in a small house that also served as a barn (see Peterson, “Life Sketch of Ole Hansen,” 1).

When Mormon missionaries came to his town, he was opposed to their presence. But after listening to them, he prayed to know the truth about Mormonism. Amid the prevailing opposition, he saw a light and knew Mormonism was true (see Peterson, “Life Sketch of Ole Hansen,” 1). On 28 May 1867, he was baptized. After his baptism, he and his family were persecuted until 1870, when part of his family immigrated to America (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 116).

Ole settled in Logan, Cache County, Utah, where he was a leader in a Scandinavian organization. In 1883, he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 7 November 1883 and was assigned to labor in the Århus Conference. His first baptism was his own son. Later, he baptized his son’s family (see Peterson, “Life Sketch of Ole Hansen,” 2). For ten months, he was President of the Odense Branch, where he baptized thirteen other converts. He departed from Copenhagen on 15 June 1885 aboard the Panther (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 116).

Ole’s grandson remembers him as a “dear grandfather” who was “more lovable and kind to children” because the gospel had made him “realize their value.” In 1908, he fell from an apple tree. He suffered for four days before dying in 1908 at Smithfield at age eighty-two (see Peterson, “Life Sketch of Ole Hansen,” 2).


Peter Hansen

(Peder Olsen)

1864–1927

Residence: Smithfield, Cache County Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 5 November 1892

Missionary labors: Copenhagen Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 20 September 1894

Name of departure ship: Thorsa

Birth date: 23 April 1864

Birthplace: Allesø, Allesø, Odense, Denmark

Father: Hansen, Ole

Mother: Hansdatter, Marie

Spouse: Gamet, Ida Louisa

Marriage date: 30 December 1885

Marriage place: Logan Temple, Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Death date: 9 March 1927

Death place: Smithfield, Cache Co., Utah

Burial place: Smithfield, Cache Co., Utah

In 1868, Peter immigrated to America with his mother, twin brother, and two sisters. The rest of his family stayed in Denmark until they raised enough money to emigrate the following year. The family resided in Logan, Cache County, Utah, before moving to Smithfield, Cache County (see Nilson, “Life Sketch of Peter Hansen and Ida Louisa Gamet Hansen,” 1).

After Peter’s marriage to Ida Gamet in 1885, he worked as a farmer in the Smithfield area for six years before receiving a mission call to Scandinavia. He had to borrow money to serve the mission, leaving his wife and three children in poverty (see Nilson, “Life Sketch of Peter Hansen and Ida Louisa Gamet Hansen,” 2).

Peter arrived in Copenhagen on 5 November 1892 and was assigned to labor in the Copenhagen Conference. After completing an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 20 September 1894 aboard the steamer Thorsa (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 328–29, 337).

After returning to Utah, Peter paid back the money he had borrowed for his mission. His daughter recalled that he said it was the “easiest debt . . . he ever paid in his life.” After paying the debt, he became a successful farmer, dairyman, and logger (see Nilson, “Life Sketch of Peter Hansen and Ida Louisa Gamet Hansen,” 2).

He did not neglect his priesthood responsibilities during his prosperity. His daughter said that he was “blessed with the gift of healing”—often being called upon to administer to the sick. “He was never afraid to enter a sick room because he was sure the Lord would protect him” (see Nilson, “Life Sketch of Peter Hansen and Ida Louisa Gamet Hansen,” 3).

Peter served a mission to the Logan Temple, traveling by pony or wagon—sometimes returning home at night with icicles on his mustache. He also served as a counselor in three bishoprics and as president of the Smithfield Scandinavian organization for several years (see Nilson, “Life Sketch of Peter Hansen and Ida Louisa Gamet Hansen,” 2–3).

Besides his Church service, Peter was active in civic affairs. He was mayor of Smithfield from 1910 to 1911, president of the Smithfield Irrigation Company for eight years, a trustee on the school board, and in the presidency of the 173rd Quorum of the Seventy. He died in 1927 in Smithfield at age sixty-two (see Nilson, “Life Sketch of Peter Hansen and Ida Louisa Gamet Hansen,” 3).

Peter Henry Hansen

(Peder Pedersen)

1850–1917

Residence: Mayfield, Sanpete Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 14 November 1890

Missionary labors: Copenhagen Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 4 August 1892

Birth date: 17 February 1850

Birthplace: Frøbjerg, Orte, Odense, Denmark

Father: Nielsen, Peder

Mother: Nielsdatter, Ane

Spouse: Carlsen, Anninena Caroline

Marriage date: 12 June 1876

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 30 August 1917

Death place: Mayfield, Sanpete Co., Utah

Burial place: Salt Lake City Cemetery, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Peter joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on 4 February 1864 possibly due to the influence of his mother, Anne Nielsdatter and stepfather Henrik Hansen. He was baptized by Thomas Hansen. By 1869, he had immigrated to America and was residing in Mayfield, Sanpete County, Utah (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 117). Here he was ordained a Seventy on 1 March 1885.

He accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 14 November 1890 and was assigned to labor in the Copenhagen Conference. He spent twenty months of his mission in the Sjælland District. During his tenure as president of the district, he moved the mission home from the remote town of Krøjerup (Bromme, Sorø) to the city of Slagelse (Sorø), which “was the means of infusing new life in the mission.” After completing an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 4 August 1892 (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 117). On 30 November 1907, Peter was ordained to the office of high priest by Andrew C. Nielsen. He died of anemia in 1917 at Mayfield at age sixty-seven.


Peter Olsen Hansen

(Peter Olsen)

1818–95

Residence: Manti, Sanpete Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 14 September 1880

Missionary labors: Writer for the Scandinaviens Stjerne

Departure date from Copenhagen: 15 October 1882

Name of departure ship: Cato

Birth date: 11 June 1818

Birthplace: Holmens-Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark

Father: Hansen, Ole Peter

Mother: Erichsdatter, Martha Margrethe

Spouse: Dahl, Augusta

Marriage date: 23 November 1868

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Nielsen, Ane

Marriage date: 3 July 1873

Spouse: Thomsen, Margaretta

Marriage date: 18 October 1875

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 9 August 1895

Death place: Manti, Sanpete Co., Utah

Peter immigrated to America in 1843. He was baptized on 7 March 1844 in Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, by his brother Han C. Hansen. He was the third Dane to join the Church and the first to be called to serve a mission in Scandinavia (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 117).

Soon after his baptism, he moved to Nauvoo, Hancock County, Illinois, and helped build the temple in that community. There he began a Danish translation of the Book of Mormon.

Peter journeyed to the Salt Lake Valley in September 1847 (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 2:766).

In 1849, he was called to accompany Elder Erastus Snow on a mission to Scandinavia. In Denmark, he finished translating the Book of Mormon into Danish and helped Elder Snow establish the mission. He also served as president of the Copenhagen Conference from 1852 to 1853. In 1855, six years after he began the mission, he returned to the Salt Lake Valley (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 2–4, 7–8, 15, 20, 22, 25–27, 30, 34, 47, 71, 76–78, 81, 87, 97, 215, 222, 250–52, 257, 266).

Peter lived in many communities in Utah including Fairview, Manti, Mount Pleasant, and Richfield. In 1873, he returned to Scandinavia to fulfill a second mission. During this mission, he was president of the Ålborg Conference. In 1882, he made a third missionary journey to Scandinavia—this time as a writer for the Scandinaviens Stjerne—the Church’s publication for the Saints in Scandinavia which he helped begin on his first mission (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 2:766).

All told, Peter Hansen spent eleven years as a full-time missionary. He baptized many converts and also helped many Latter-day Saints immigrate to the West (History of Sanpete and Emery Counties, Utah, 127). He died in 1895 at Manti, Sanpete County, Utah, at age seventy-seven.


Willard Snow Hansen

1856–1927

Residence: Brigham City, Box Elder Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 23 November 1886

Missionary labors: Copenhagen Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 23 August 1888

Birth date: 19 April 1856

Birthplace: Brigham City, Box Elder Co., Utah

Father: Hansen, Christian

Mother: Ericksen, Elizabetha

Spouse: Larsen, Maria

Marriage date: 3 May 1875

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Christiansen, Annie Marie

Marriage date: 6 July 1882

Spouse: Reeder, Lydia Maria

Marriage date: 4 October 1898

Marriage place: Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Funk, Caroline Jacobene

Marriage date: 28 November 1900

Marriage place: Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 13 October 1927

Death place: Brigham City, Box Elder Co., Utah

Burial place: Brigham City Cemetery, Brigham City, Box Elder Co., Utah

Willard operated the Collinston Dairy from 1879 to 1893, a Latter-day Saint co-op. Frustrated with the operation, he concluded that running a sheep ranch was better suited to him. He acquired five thousand acres of government land and purchased three hundred head of breeding ewes in California. He then established one of the largest sheep enterprises in Utah (see Carter, Our Pioneer Heritage, 9:610).

He willingly left this enterprise to serve a mission to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 23 November 1886 and was assigned to labor in the Copenhagen Conference. After serving honorably, he departed from Copenhagen on 23 August 1888 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 299–300, 305).

When he returned to Utah, he was fined two hundred dollars and sentenced to four months in prison for unlawful cohabitation. He served the sentence from November 1888 through March 1889 (see Jenson, LDS Church Chronology, 24 November 1888). After his prison term, Willard distinguished himself in Church service and secular endeavors. He served in a bishopric for six years and was a speaker at the Box Elder Tabernacle services in 1897. He was voted Outstanding Utah Farmer in 1898 for his wheat crop and his prizewinning sheep. He was influential in increasing the number of sheep in Utah from 10,000 in 1880 to almost 300,000 by 1900. After 1900, with the creation of the Cache National Forest and the institution of federal controls on grazing, the number of sheep fell to less than 75,000 in 1910, and the production of wool to less than 130,000 pounds (see Carter, Our Pioneer Heritage, 9:610).

In 1909 and again in 1913, he was elected a representative to the Utah legislature. From 1919 to 1922, he served on the board of trustees of the Utah State Agricultural College in Logan and in 1922, as vice president of the First National Bank in that same community (see correspondence from Robert and Gloria H. Jenson, 10 August 1999). He died in 1927 at Brigham City, Box Elder County, Utah, at age seventy-one.


Alfred Hanson

(Alfrid Larsson)

1850–1934

Residence: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 17 October 1876

Missionary labors: Stockholm Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 7 September 1878

Birth date: 26 February 1850

Birthplace: Holmerud, Brålanda, Älvsborg, Sweden

Father: Hansson, Lars

Mother: Persdotter, Kajsa

Spouse: Lundberg, Selma Gustavia

Marriage date: 9 December 1872

Marriage place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Spouse: Lundberg, Vendia

Marriage date: 10 April 1876

Marriage place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Death date: 28 February 1934

Death place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Burial place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

In 1865, Alfred, along with his parents and two younger brothers, Gustaf Emil and Carl Albert, immigrated to America. He and his family were in poor circumstances at the time of immigration. Their passage was generously paid by a Brother Anderson (see Emigration Records of the Scandinavian Mission, Record B 1864–1865, no. 1060, 59; FHL Film #0025696).

In 1876, Alfred, a resident of Logan, Cache County, Utah, accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 17 October 1876 and was assigned to be president of the Stockholm Conference. After completing an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 7 September 1878 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 226–27, 233).

Alfred returned to Scandinavia for a second mission in 1897. He arrived in Copenhagen on 1 November 1897 and was assigned to labor in the Skåne Conference. After serving faithfully for nearly two years, he departed from Copenhagen on 12 October 1899 aboard the steamer Bravo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 361, 364, 371).

Alfred died of ailments due to advanced age in 1934 at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Parley E. Peterson, at age eighty-four. At his funeral services, I. C. Thoreson of Salt Lake City, a close friend for over sixty years, gave an account of his missionary experiences. His life was compared to a still, cool mountain lake at whose side one finds repose (see “Eulogize Memory of Alf Hanson,” Logan Herald Journal, 5 March 1934).


Anders Hanson

1838–1912

Residence: West Jordan, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 30 November 1878; 21 March 1891

Missionary labors: Skåne Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 28 August 1880; 12 May 1892

Name of departure ship: Otto

Birth date: 18 January 1838

Birthplace: Valby, Kyrkheddinge, Malmöhus, Sweden

Father: Åkasson, Hans

Mother: Larsdotter, Kirsten

Spouse: Olson, Caroline Catharine

Marriage date: 28 September 1867

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah

Spouse: Pehrson, Bengta

Marriage date: 9 December 1880

Death date: 13 August 1912
Death place: Midvale, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Burial place: Midvale, Salt Lake Co., Utah

At age nineteen, Anders joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on 10 May 1857. He served as a local missionary before immigrating to America aboard the Monarch of the Sea. He trekked across the plains in 1861 with the John R. Murdock ox-team company (see “Anders [Andrew] Hanson,” 1).

After arriving in Utah, Anders worked on the construction of the Salt Lake Temple for three successive winters. At other seasons, he was a teamster helping to bring immigrants to Utah. When the Black Hawk War began, he enlisted (see “Anders [Andrew] Hanson,” 1).

In 1867, he married Caroline Olson. They homesteaded ten acres in Midvale, Salt Lake County. On this acreage, he built an adobe house in which four of his daughters were born (see “Anders [Andrew] Hanson,” 1).

Anders was residing in West Jordan, Salt Lake County, when he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 30 November 1878 and was assigned to labor in the Skåne Conference. At the end of an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 28 August 1880 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 235–36, 244).

Later that same year, Anders was married a second time to a woman he had met on his mission. He built another adobe house for her. This second marriage led to his imprisonment for several months due to unlawful cohabitation (“Anders [Andrew] Hanson,” 1). By 1891, he had again accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 21 March 1891 and was assigned to labor in the Ålborg and Skåne conferences. After completing this mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 12 May 1892 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 319, 321, 325). He died in Midvale, Salt Lake County, in 1912 at age seventy-four.


Edward Hanson

(Edvard Larsson or Hansson)

1855–1918

Residence: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 1 November 1884

Missionary labors: Stockholm and Copenhagen conferences

Departure date from Copenhagen: 7 0ctober 1886

Name of departure ship: Milo

Birth date: 30 October 1854

Birthplace: Homerud, Sundals-Ryr, Älvsborg, Sweden

Father: Hansson, Lars

Mother: Persdotter, Kajsa

Spouse: Blair, Martha (Mattie) Jane

Marriage date: 28 April 1887

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 18 March 1918

Death place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Burial place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Edward, a resident of Logan, Cache County, Utah, accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1884. He arrived in Copenhagen on 1 November 1884 and was assigned to labor in the Stockholm and Copenhagen conferences. After serving an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 7 October 1886 aboard the steamer Milo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 229, 282–83).

Returning to Logan, he worked as a civil engineer. It was stated that “he was perhaps better acquainted with the location of section corners and indefinite boundary lines of this section than any man here and was frequently called upon to give evidence where titles to land were involved and uncertain boundaries were being adjusted” (“Brief Illness Fatal to Expert Civil Engineer,” Deseret Evening News, 19 March 1918).

He died after a brief illness in 1918 in Logan at age fifty-three. At the funeral services, I. C. Thoresen, Surveyor General of Salt Lake City, said, “Ed was endowed with a real and true Christian spirit, disposition and character. It was said that Edward was generous to a fault to friend or foe, a peacemaker in all circumstances. He was slow to anger, patient and long-suffering, meek and humble, never finding fault with his fellow man, whether good or bad; nor with things as they are, but assume ‘whatever is, is right’” (“Brief Illness Fatal to Expert Civil Engineer,” Deseret Evening News, 19 March 1918).


James John Hanson

(Jens Hansen)

1844–1925

Residence: Hyrum, Cache Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 6 November 1880

Missionary labors: Århus Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 16 June 1882

Name of departure ship: Albano

Birth date: 8 November 1844

Birthplace: Kajrød, Birkerød, Frederiksborg, Denmark

Father: Nielsen, Hans

Mother: Olsdatter, Ane Frederikke

Spouse: Hansen, Caroline Christene

Marriage date: 18 July 1868

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Jensen, Anna Katrine

Marriage date: 3 December 1890

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 3 December 1925

Death place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Burial place: Hyrum, Cache Co., Utah

In 1856, James emigrated from Denmark to America. He crossed the plains with the Knud Peterson company to reach the Salt Lake Valley. In 1866, he was commissioned a second lieutenant in the Black Hawk War. A few years later, he was selected as a president of the Sixty-second Quorum of the Seventy (see “Services Held at Hyrum for James J. Hansen,” Logan Journal, 9 December 1925).

James was residing in Hyrum, Cache County Co., Utah, when he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 6 November 1880 and was assigned to labor in the Århus Conference. After serving an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 16 June 1882 aboard the steamer Albano (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 250, 252, 265).

James returned to Hyrum, where he served as a counselor to Bishop N. J. Nielsen in the Hyrum Third Ward. He was also a member of the first organized choir and a comedian in a number of plays in Hyrum (see Allen, Home in the Hills of Bridger Land, 146, 190, 197). He established a pottery trade and became known as “Potter Hansen.” His business was located at 100 North 200 West in Hyrum. He died in 1925 in Hyrum at age eighty (see “Services Held at Hyrum for James J. Hansen,” Logan Journal, 9 December 1925).


Ludvig S. Hanson

(Ludvig Sjunnesson)

1857–1925

Residence: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 20 June 1892

Missionary labors: Skåne Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 19 July 1894

Name of departure ship: Rona

Birth date: 5 September 1858

Birthplace: Skillinge, Munka-Ljungby, Kristianstad, Sweden

Father: Johansson (Kjelm), Sjunne

Mother: Appelquist, Maria

Spouse: Green, Annie Margret

Marriage date: 4 February 1891

Marriage place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Death date: 25 September 1925

Death place: Hunter, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Burial place: Salt Lake City Cemetery, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Ludwig immigrated to the Brighton area of Utah in 1877, where he became a farmer. Ludwig was a resident of Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah and had been endowed on 4 February 1891 when he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 20 June 1892 and was assigned to labor in the Skåne Conference. After serving an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 19 July 1894 aboard the steamer Rona (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 328–29, 337).

Ludwig died on 28 September 1925 in Salt Lake City at age sixty-eight. He died as the result of injuries received in an auto accident. He was driving from Salt Lake to the Hansen home in Hunter. His son, Ludwig Jr., and Fred Falcon, age fifteen, were in the car with him when an Orem train struck the car. Ludwig and Fred were killed in the accident (see “Second Victim of Crash of Autos Dies in S. L.,” Deseret News, 29 September 1925). Funeral services were held at the Hunter Ward chapel (see “Victim of Accident Dies at Hospital,” Salt Lake Tribune, 30 September 1925).

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Peter Gustaf Hanson

(Pehr Gustaf Hansson)

1853–1935

Residence: Payson, Utah Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 28 September 1886

Missionary labors: Stockholm Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 23 August 1888

Birth date: 6 January 1853

Birthplace: Närtuna, Närtuna, Stockholm, Sweden

Father: Hansson, Hans Petter

Mother: Sahlstrom (Selstrum), Ulrika Lovisa (Larsson)

Spouse: Anderson, Sophia

Marriage date: 19 June 1876

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 19 February 1935

Death place: Payson, Utah Co., Utah

Burial place: Payson Cemetery, Payson, Utah Co., Utah

Peter, a carpenter by trade, was baptized on 30 April 1875. Six weeks later, he immigrated to America. He arrived in Salt Lake City in August 1875. Unable to find work in the city, he settled in Payson, Utah County, where he worked for John Jackson. From 1876 to 1906, he worked for the Huish Planing Mill, one of the early industries in that community (see “Peter G. Hansen Called by Death,” Payson Chronicle, 22 February 1935).

He interrupted his employment to accept a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 28 September 1886 and was assigned to labor in the Stockholm Conference. During this mission, he baptized forty-four individuals. After serving an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 23 August 1888 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 299–300, 354, 356, 366).

In 1896, he served a second mission to Scandinavia. On this mission, he baptized seventeen individuals and built a chapel in southern Sweden (see “Peter G. Hansen Called by Death,” Payson Chronicle, 22 February 1935).

He returned to Payson. He died in 1935 at his home at age eighty-two from old age (see “Peter G. Hansen Called by Death,” Payson Chronicle, 22 February 1935).


August Leander Hedberg

1840–98

Residence: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 7 March 1885

Missionary labors: Stockholm Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 7 April 1887

Name of departure ship: Panther

Birth date: 24 August 1840

Birthplace: Hyrdbacken, Hällefors, Örebro, Sweden

Father: Hedberg, Nils Jansson

Mother: Tunander, Dorothea

Spouse: Svensson, Marie Katrina

Marriage date: 26 June 1864

Marriage place: Stockholm, Stockholm, Sweden

Spouse: Evans, Jessie

Marriage date: about 1870

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 21 July 1898

Death place: Los Angeles, Los Angeles Co., California

Burial place: Los Angeles, Los Angeles Co., California

August was residing in Salt Lake City when he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. On the mission, he acquired the reputation of being the “champion tract distributor in Norrlanda.” He wrote from Härnösand (Västernorrland County) of the persecution he received as a missionary: “In this neighborhood I came nearly receiving a whipping from a baker who tried to hit me with a large brush . . . a few minutes later, however, I met the inspector, who took all my books under his arm and made me follow him to the priest. . . . He carried a long whip which he swung in a threatening manner, while he uttered the most foul oaths and curses. He presented me to the priest as a messenger from the deepest hell.” August continued, “You may believe that the inhabitants in this northern country are a hard set, but I do not mind this; at some future day they will wish that they had not acted so cruelly toward one who traveled for the purpose of offering them the great gift of life” (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 276).

On 22 November 1884, August wrote from Åbo (Turku-Pori County), Finland, to President Anthon H. Lund of his initial success in that northern clime. However, most of his letter was about the persecution he faced from government officials. He concluded, “Notwithstanding all the opposition I have had, I am happy to be laboring for the progress of the work of the Lord and never in my life have I been more blessed than during my sojourn in Finland: yet I shall soon have to leave here in order to avoid punishment, for no mercy can be found among the Finns” (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 281–82). He departed from Finland after baptizing eight persons.

August returned to Copenhagen and boarded the steamer Panther on 7 August 1887. Joining him aboard ship were 108 emigrating Latter-day Saints and eight returning missionaries (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 302). After a short voyage to Hull, England, August journeyed by train to Liverpool where he boarded a vessel bound for the States.

After traveling by train and ship, August arrived in Salt Lake City. His stay was brief, as the lure of sunny weather beckoned him to southern California. At the time of his death, August was serving as a counselor in the Los Angeles Branch (see Jenson, LDS Church Chronology, 21 July 1898). He died on 21 July 1898 at the age of fifty-seven.


Victor Charles Hegsted

(Viktor Carl Högsted)

1865–1941

Residence: Harrisville, Weber Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 1 December 1885

Missionary labors: Ålborg Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 29 September 1887

Name of departure ship: Bravo

Birth date: 18 April 1865

Birthplace: Charlottegård #3, St. Johannes-Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark

Father: Högsted, Hans Christian Sorensen

Mother: Börglum, Maren

Spouse: Lee, Lovina Nielsen

Marriage date: 5 February 1885

Marriage place: Logan Temple, Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Spouse: Martin, Ada

Marriage date: 17 December 1890

Marriage place: Logan Temple, Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Spouse: Grover, Hannah

Death date: 15 May 1941

Death place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Burial place: Wasatch Lawn Cemetery, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Andrew Jenson records that Victor was born on the Atlantic Ocean as his parents were en route to Salt Lake City from Denmark. According to a letter written by Victor on 18 April 1941, he was born in Denmark, a few days before his parents boarded the steamer Kimball. The family arrived in America at the end of the Civil War. They reached Salt Lake City on 8 November 1865. During their trek to the valley, his father acted as the company doctor (see letter from Victor Högsted to his daughter, Geneva, 18 April 1941, Salt Lake City). He and his parents located in Huntsville, Weber County (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:769).

While residing in Huntsville, Victor accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 1 December 1885 and was assigned to labor in the Ålborg Conference. During his missionary labors, his wife died. When he left Copenhagen, there were eighty-eight emigrating Latter-day Saints and eight other returning missionaries under the leadership of Rasmus Rasmussen aboard the steamer Bravo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 294–95, 302).

In 1894, Victor moved to Salem, Fremont County, Idaho. There he labored for “two years in the interest of the religion classes of the Fremont Stake, and for many years as a Stake home missionary.” He served as a president of the Eightieth Quorum of the Seventy, a position he held until being ordained a bishop. He served as bishop of the Salem Ward in Fremont County.

Civically, Victor represented Fremont County in the senate at the fifth session of the Idaho legislature. He was reelected to serve in the sixth session. Historian Andrew Jenson said of him, “He is an energetic worker both in religious and secular affairs and his affable and kind manner wins friends for him everywhere” (Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:769).

Victor suffered from asthma towards the end of his life and said of the illness, “This asthma seems to have gotten a strangle hold on me. . . . Its mighty uncomfortable to be unable to breathe only half a breath” (see letter from Victor Högsted to his daughter, Geneva, 18 April 1941, Salt Lake City). He died in 1941 at Salt Lake City at age seventy-six.


Niels Christian Heilesen

(Niels Christian Jensen)

1849–1907

Residence: Glenwood, Sevier Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 1 September 1881

Missionary labors: Ålborg Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 15 June 1883

Name of departure ship: Pacific (Milo)

Birth date: 19 February 1849

Birthplace: Villingshøj, Sct. Olai, Hjørring, Denmark

Father: Nielsen (Heilesen), Jens Christian

Mother: Jansdatter (Frost), Marie

Spouse: Stephensen (Steffensen), Inger Kirstine (Christina)

Marriage date: 13 October 1873

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Tooley, Lanie Margaret

Marriage date: 9 December 1885

Spouse: Andreason, Johanne Frandsen

Death date: 4 March 1907

Death place: Burton, Madison Co., Idaho

Burial place: Burton Cemetery, Burton, Madison Co., Idaho

Niels was the oldest of seven children. As a young boy, he dreamed of owning a store. He received his schooling from a local minister. When he was thirteen years old, his parents joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Niels himself was baptized in September 1864 by Hans Jensen. By age fifteen, he and his family were immigrating to America. They traveled aboard the Monarch of the Sea from Liverpool to New York. Aboard ship, there was an outbreak of measles. Niels’s little sister, Ane Marie, succumbed to the illness and was buried at sea. Remaining family members arrived safely in New York. They traveled from New York to Missouri by train and then by steamer up the Missouri River. The rest of their journey to Utah was with the Captain William R. Preston wagon train (see Heilsen, “Niels Christian Heilesen,” 1–2).

The family settled in Circleville, Piute County, before moving to Manti, Sanpete County. Niels is remembered for winning a party prize in Manti for being the skinniest man present. At that time, he was employed herding horses on the range and hauling freight from Richfield to Pioche, Lincoln County, Nevada (see Heilsen, “Niels Christian Heilesen,” 3).

After his first marriage, Niels and his bride left Manti and settled in Glenwood, Sevier County. While a resident of Glenwood, he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia (see Heilsen, “Niels Christian Heilesen,” 3). He arrived in Copenhagen on 1 September 1881 and was assigned to labor in the Ålborg Conference. He departed from Copenhagen on 15 June 1883 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 262–63, 269).

When he returned to the States, he learned that his wife had divorced him (see Heilsen, “Niels Christian Heilesen,” 3). Discouraged but wanting to make the most of his life, he developed an interest in merchandising. When the United Order in Glenwood dissolved, he held stock in the enterprise. He purchased the remaining stock on credit and was successful in paying off his debts through merchandising. One advertisement from his store read: “New Summer Goods at the Glenwood Co-op. We also have a good stock of Z.C.M.I. Shoes, ready-made Clothing” (An Enduring Legacy, 9:370).

During his merchandising days, Niels gave service to members of the Glenwood Ward in Sevier County. For four years, he served as the second counselor in the YMMIA and as a choir director (see Warnock, Our Own Sevier, 208). In 1898, he moved to Burton, Madison County, Idaho. He sold his store to his son Henry (see An Enduring Legacy, 9:370).

In Idaho, he purchased large tracts of farmland and built a home. One room of the home was used as a store and post office. He became very prosperous. “At the bank he was told he didn’t need to sign any papers, that his word was his bond” (see Heilsen, “Niels Christian Heilesen,” 4)

At one time, he took a load of cattle back to Chicago in train cars. While the cars were stopped at a station, Niels climbed atop the box car to check on the cattle. The train started up unexpectedly, and he was unable to get down. He clung to the train until it reached the next station. Although he survived the ordeal, he contracted pneumonia. The illness left him with an asthmatic condition. He was never well after the incident (see Heilsen, “Niels Christian Heilesen,” 5). Niels died in 1907 at age fifty-eight.


John August Hellström

(Johan August Hellström)

1853–1917

Residence: Richfield, Sevier Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 2 October 1889

Missionary labors: Stockholm Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 31 March 1892

Birth date: 22 March 1853

Birthplace: Mechaniskewekstaden, Motala, Östergötland, Sweden

Father: Hellström, Johan Erik

Mother: Olofsdotter, Anna Brita (Bridget)

Spouse: Klaesson, Jenny Mary

Marriage date: 28 September 1881

Marriage place: St. George, Washington Co., Utah

Spouse: Morrison, Amanda Puella

Marriage date: 28 (18) September 1881

Marriage place: St. George, Washington Co., Utah

Death date: 23 July 1917

Death place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Burial place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

When John was thirteen years old, he and his mother joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and left Sweden bound for Zion. Purportedly, in 1867 he walked to Salt Lake City pushing a handcart. Once in the city, he taught at Morgan’s Business College before being called by Church leaders to settle in Richfield, Sevier County, and live the United Order. In that southern Utah community, he was known as a “thrifty, ambitious, dependable and religious” man (Warnock, Memories of Sevier Stake, 459).

In 1878, when the city of Richfield was incorporated, John was elected city recorder. In this official capacity, he recorded an afternoon of dancing provided for the juveniles (see www.ancestry.com).

John accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1889. He said of that call on 2 September 1889, “The Lord has promised that thru weak instruments He will confound the wise” (Warnock, Memories of Sevier Stake, 26). He arrived in Copenhagen on 2 October 1889 and was assigned to the Stockholm Conference. During his mission, he served as a writer and translator in the mission office in Copenhagen under the direction of President Edward H. Anderson. From 1890 to 1892, he was an assistant worker in the Nordstjernan office (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 229, 313). John departed from Copenhagen on 31 March 1892.

He returned to Richfield, where he lived until 1898. He was employed as a bookkeeper for several businesses and served as the county clerk and recorder for Sevier County for thirteen years before moving to Salt Lake City. He worked as a bookkeeper at ZCMI for ten to fifteen years. His biographer said of him, “He was always a devout Latter-day Saint and acknowledged the hand of his Heavenly Father in everything he did” (Warnock, Memories of Sevier Stake, 460). At the time of his death in 1917, John was sixty-four years old. His biographer penned, “He was a faithful, painstaking man, true to the Church and the work of the Lord” (“Passing Events,” Improvement Era, 20:1034).


Andrew Hendricksen

(Andreas Henriksen)

1830–98

Residence: Levan, Juab Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 27 November 1877

Missionary labors: Norway and Denmark

Departure date from Copenhagen: 24 June 1878

Name of departure ship: Cameo

Birth date: 8 March 1830

Birthplace: Eskerud, Skoger, Vestfold, Norway

Father: Ellefsen, Hendrik

Mother: Andersdatter, Karen Sophia

Spouse: Nielsen, Elizabeth Catherine

Marriage date: 10 July 1857

Spouse: Hansen, Hannah Margaret Marie

Marriage date: 7 December 1861

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Anderson, Anna Christina

Death date: 25 June 1898

Death place: Levan, Juab Co., Utah

Burial place: Levan, Juab Co., Utah

Andrew immigrated to the United States in 1854. He was baptized on 3 March 1860 by Hans Koford in Omaha, Douglas County, Nebraska (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 119). Following his baptism, Andrew joined Mormon pioneers and journeyed to Utah and settled in Levan, Juab County. From Levan, he moved to Marysvale, Piute County, where he served as the presiding elder of the Mormon settlement. He also served as a captain in the militia during the Black Hawk War of 1865–1866 and was instrumental in evacuating the Marysvale community in 1866 (see Jenson, Encyclopedic History of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 481).

Andrew was residing in Levan, when he accepted a call to the Scandinavian mission in 1877. He arrived in Copenhagen on 27 November 1877 and was assigned to serve in Norway and Denmark. After completing an honorable mission, Andrew accompanied six returning missionaries and 446 emigrating Latter-day Saints aboard the steamer Cameo from Copenhagen to Hull, England. After voyaging across the Atlantic Ocean and crossing the states to Utah, he settled once again in Levan (see Jenson, Encyclopedic History of the Church, 481).

In 1883, he accepted a mission call to the eastern states (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 119). Andrew died in 1898 in Levan at age sixty-eight.


Niels Jacob Henricksen

1858–1929

Residence: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 18 September 1891

Missionary labors: Copenhagen and Skåne Conferences

Departure date from Copenhagen: 10 August 1893

Name of departure ship: Milo

Birth date: 1 October 1858

Birthplace: Råbylille, Elmelunde, Præstø, Denmark

Father: Larsen, Henrick

Mother: Jensdatter, Kirsten

Spouse: Hansen, Mary Ann (Ann Marie)

Marriage date: 10 October 1882

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Johanson, Maria

Marriage date: 20 March 1896

Marriage place: Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 29 January 1929

Death place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Burial place: Salt Lake City Cemetery, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

By age nine, Niels was sent from home to herd cattle during the summer months. Returning to his home in the fall, he attended school until age fourteen. At that time, he was confirmed a member of the Lutheran Church and sent to the city of Stege to be a letterer and carver in marble and all types of stone. He did well in his apprenticeship and was employed by Oluf Cederholm (see Henricksen, “Family History—Niels Jacob Henricksen,” 1).

At age nineteen, Niels went to Copenhagen and obtained employment. There he was introduced to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints by one of his working companions, Julius Thor. He was baptized on 11 February 1879 by local elder Carl Jensen. Following his baptism, he was ordained a priest on 14 September 1879 and invited to preach the gospel in the northeast Sjælland Branch (see Henricksen, “Family History—Niels Jacob Henricksen,” 1–3).

He was ordained an elder on 15 August 1880 by Carl C. Asmussen of Salt Lake City. In 1881, he was sent to Helsingør (Frederiksborg County) to preach and scatter tracts door-to-door. Three days after his arrival in Helsingør, he was arrested and taken to a local police station. Authorities told him to leave the city immediately as his teachings were dangerous. He refused to obey the orders. Even after being escorted from town, he returned and preached about the worth of the Prophet Joseph Smith’s mission. “I became so well-known in the city that every child almost knew me and often called me the Mormon Prophet” (Henricksen, “Family History—Niels Jacob Henricksen,” 1–3).

Because of his membership in the Church, his parents disowned him (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 118). His father said to him, “You are a disgrace to the family and I want you to leave the country.” His father was so anxious for him to leave that he offered, “I’ll pay your fare.” Before his father gave him the money, “he handed me a note to the effect that at his death, I should not be recognized as one of the family” (see Henricksen, “Family History—Niels Jacob Henricksen,” 3–4).

Niels immigrated to Utah on 29 August 1881. He resided for two years in Logan, Cache County, and worked in the monument business owned by James Brown. He then went to Montana and worked on the railroad before returning to the employ of Brown (see Henricksen, “Family History—Niels Jacob Henricksen,” 4).

He was ordained a Seventy on 28 August 1891 and called to serve a mission in Scandinavia in 1891. He arrived in Copenhagen on 18 September 1891 and was assigned to labor in the Copenhagen and Skåne Conferences. On this mission, he presided over the Øerne Branch. While laboring in the Copenhagen Conference, Niels was banished from Denmark. The circumstances surrounding his banishment began when he and his companion held meetings and baptized several on the islands of Falster (Maribo County) and Møen (Præstø County). Their actions annoyed the Lutheran priests, who complained to civil authorities—the Mormons were “dangerous foreigners with false and misleading doctrines.” Niels and his companion were given two weeks to get out of Denmark. During those weeks, he was threatened by mobs. He escaped the mobs by the assistance of a friend. Of his experience, historian Andrew Jenson wrote, “It seems that nothing but the power of God saved the Elders from severe injury.” Despite the turmoil, Niels had opportunities to bear his testimony and preside over the Skåne (Sweden) Conference (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 321, 325).

When he left Scandinavia, he was one of the missionaries in charge of seventy-one emigrating Saints aboard the Milo bound for Hull, England (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 332). He boarded the Alaska in Liverpool and returned to the States. Of this experience he wrote, “I felt grateful to my Heavenly Father that He had preserved my life during my two years’ absence” (Henricksen, “Family History—Niels Jacob Henricksen,” 7).

From 1893 to 1896, Niels experienced difficult economic circumstances: “My income was not sufficient to keep soul and body together.” In 1896, he gained steady work with the Elias Morris and Sons firm. In 1900, he was called to be a home missionary and ward teacher among the Scandinavians in the Granite Stake of Zion. He also served as a presiding teacher in the Farmers Ward (see Henricksen, “Family History—Niels Jacob Henricksen,” 7–8).

In 1903, he was again called to serve in his native country. He sailed aboard the New England to Liverpool. On 19 August 1903, he arrived in Copenhagen. Before receiving his appointment, he visited extended family members and learned of his father’s death and his father’s belief that the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints was “the most sensible religion after all” (see Henricksen, “Family History—Niels Jacob Henricksen,” 9–10). Niels was appointed to labor in the Copenhagen Conference where his former missionary companion presided as president (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 397, 399). During this mission, he assisted the president with office work until he was appointed to replace him as president. On this mission, he baptized thirty persons and confirmed twenty-five. He left Copenhagen for Liverpool on 26 January 1906 (see Henricksen, “Family History—Niels Jacob Henricksen,” 10).

Upon returning home, he was again called to be a home missionary and ward teacher in the Granite Stake. He returned to his employ with Elias Morris and Sons. Of all his service in the Church, Niels penned, “I want to say right here that not at any time, either at home or abroad, have I enjoyed any labor in this Church better than that of being a humble teacher among the people.” He wrote an autobiography in 1922 in Salt Lake City (see Henricksen, “Family History—Niels Jacob Henricksen,” 11; Bitton, Guide to Mormon Diaries and Autobiographies, 153). Niels died in January 1929 at age seventy.


Nils Henrikson

1824–1913

Residence: Richfield, Sevier Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 14 September 1880

Missionary labors: Skåne Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 16 June 1882

Name of departure ship: Bravo

Birth date: 15 September 1824

Birthplace: Ålstorp, Västra Karaby, Malmöhus, Sweden

Father: Svensson, Henrik

Mother: Pålsdotter, Gunilla

Spouse: Olsen, Olina Mobeck

Marriage date: 30 November 1868

Marriage place: Santaquin, Utah Co., Utah

Death date: 18 March 1913

Death place: Richfield, Sevier Co., Utah

Burial place: Richfield, Sevier Co., Utah

Nils was baptized on 27 February 1864 by O. A. Anderson. He immigrated to Utah in 1866 and arrived in the Salt Lake Valley on 4 October of that year. He was endowed on 30 November 1868.

Nils fulfilled a mission to Minnesota in 1877 (see “Death of Niels Hendriksen,” Richfield Reaper, 20 March 1913). After returning from that mission, he resided in Richfield, Sevier County, Utah. It was while living in Richfield that he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1880. He arrived in Copenhagen on 14 September 1880 and was assigned to labor in the Skåne Conference. After completing an honorable mission, Nils boarded the steamer Bravo with 125 emigrating Latter-day Saints and six other returning missionaries (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 250–51, 265).

Nils died in 1913 in Richfield at age eighty-eight from old age and general debility. His funeral services were held in the Richfield First Ward (see “Death of Niels Hendriksen,” Richfield Reaper, 20 March 1913).


Lars Johan Henström

(Lars Johan Jansson)

1837–1905

Residence: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 23 May 1890

Missionary labors: Stockholm Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 28 April 1892

Name of departure ship: Volo

Birth date: 9 February 1837

Birthplace: Kråkeberget, Norra Kyrketorp, Skaraborg, Sweden

Father: Billing, Jan (Anders) Larsson

Mother: Andersdotter, Cajsa (Catharine)

Spouse: Jonsson, Anna Maria

Marriage date: 27 November 1865

Marriage place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Death date: 22 August 1905

Death place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Burial place: Logan Cemetery, Logan, Cache Co., Utah

In 1857, Lars was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Sweden. Before immigrating to America, he labored as a missionary in Sweden for five years. He arrived in Utah in 1864 and settled in Logan, Cache County. Among near neighbors in Logan, he was known as “a quiet, unassuming man and a good citizen always” (“Laid Away to Rest,” Logan Journal, 26 August 1905).

Lars immigrated to the United States on 28 April 1864. He sailed on the Monarch of the Sea with 974 other Saints under the direction of John Smith, Patriarch to the Church. Approximately 700 of the emigrants on this ship were from Scandinavia. The ship sailed into New York City on 3 June 1864. He joined the William B. Preston company leaving from Nebraska and finally arrived in the Salt Lake Valley on 15 September 1864.

Lars met Anna Maria Jonsson in Logan, Cache County, and they were married in November 1865. Early years of married life were hard. They lived in a dugout where the roof leaked and their earthly possessions were meager. They had just a one-yard square of unbleached muslin, which they tore into two triangles for the diapers for their first baby. Lars worked as a tailor.

He accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1890. He arrived in Copenhagen on 23 May 1890 and was assigned to labor in the Stockholm Conference. After completing his mission, Lars departed from Copenhagen on 28 April 1892 aboard the steamer Volo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 316–17, 325).

He returned to Logan, where he died thirteen years later in 1905 at age sixty-eight. His funeral services were held in the Logan Sixth Ward. Those who spoke at the funeral eulogized his industry, honesty, and manly qualities (see “Laid Away to Rest,” Logan Journal, 26 August 1905).


Christian J. Hermansen

1855–1935

Residence: Elsinore, Sevier Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 30 April 1889

Missionary labors: Christiania Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 16 April 1891

Name of departure ship: Cameo

Birth date: 25 June 1855

Birthplace: Frejlev, Ålborg, Denmark

Father: Davidsen (Dunn), Herman Christian

Mother: Pedersdatter, Inger Marie

Spouse: Pedersen (Borup), Karen

Marriage date: 7 June 1877

Marriage place: Storarden, Ålborg, Denmark

Death date: 30 August 1935

Death place: Richfield, Sevier Co., Utah

Burial place: Elsinore, Sevier Co., Utah

Christian, the thirteenth child of Herman Christian Davidsen (Dunn), grew up in a poor family. His father was a blacksmith by trade and his mother a cook. He recalled that “my mother was a splendid character and that his father was a good worker, but he drank a lot. This caused him to be very cross and ugly and as children we obeyed him through fear.” Christian spent very few days in school due to an accident in which he hurt his foot. He lived at home until age eleven. At that age, he was hired out to farmers “to take care of the cows and the sheep.” At age sixteen, he was an apprentice in the Good Hope Machine Shop, a place that manufactured farming implements. There he learned the art of horseshoeing and blacksmithing (see Hermansen, “The Life Sketch of Christian Hermansen,” 1–2).

At age twenty-two, Christian began investigating religion. Although a member of the Lutheran Church, he became convinced of the truthfulness of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He was baptized in 1877 by Anders Fredrickson. At that time, he was living in Volsted, a farming community. His baptism caused great difficulties as his wife refused to accept his membership in the Church and they separated. Within a year, she returned to him and was baptized (see Hermansen, “The Life Sketch of Christian Hermansen,” 2–4).

They immigrated to America and arrived in Salt Lake City on 14 July 1879, after crossing the Atlantic aboard the Wyoming. Upon their arrival, they had only five cents in their pockets and could not speak a word of English. They located in Elsinore, Sevier County, Utah, where Christian operated a blacksmith shop for two years. They then moved to Redmond, Sevier County, where he purchased ten acres and again set up a blacksmith shop. In Redmond, he attended school and learned to speak English (see Hermansen, “The Life Sketch of Christian Hermansen,” 4–5).

He and his family then returned to Elsinore. There he accepted a mission call to serve in Scandinavia. Of this call he wrote, “We were in pretty poor circumstances, but I made arrangements to go.” He arrived in Copenhagen on 30 April 1889 after crossing the ocean on the Wyoming, the same ship that had brought him to America ten years earlier (see Hermansen, “The Life Sketch of Christian Hermansen,” 5). Christian was assigned to labor in the Christiania Conference. After completing this mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 16 April 1891 aboard the steamer Cameo with fifty-nine emigrating Latter-day Saints (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 318). He wrote, “I arrived home safely and found my family well” (Hermansen, “The Life Sketch of Christian Hermansen,” 6).

He again worked as a blacksmith until the First Presidency invited him to participate in a six-month course at the Brigham Young Academy in Provo, Utah County. After completing his studies, Christian returned to Elsinore and purchased the Farm Implements and the Elsinore Amusement Hall. These enterprises didn’t prove successful. However, his Church service in the local bishopric and the Sunday School was successful (see Hermansen, “The Life Sketch of Christian Hermansen,” 6).

To improve his economic circumstances, Christian moved to Ely, White Pine County, Nevada, and purchased a cattle ranch. After two years, he returned to Elsinore. But it was not long before he again tried his fortune in Ely. After seven years of increasing debt, he moved to Salt Lake City. There he managed a rooming and apartment house for twelve years. “I must say, through all our moving back and forth, and inconveniences my wife most patiently put up with it all and I am a firm believer in the power of prayer” (Hermansen, “The Life Sketch of Christian Hermansen,” 6–7). Christian died in 1935 at Richfield at age eighty.


Johan Bernhardt Hesse

(Christen Johansen)

1828–1910

Residence: Monroe, Sevier Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 3 June 1882

Missionary labors: Århus Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 9 June 1884

Name of departure ship: Milo

Birth date: 16 May 1828

Birthplace: Granslev, Viborg, Denmark

Father: Hesse, Johan Bernhard

Mother: Christensdatter, Maren

Spouse: Svenson, Wilhelmina

Marriage date: 16 August 1869

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 4 April 1910

Death place: Monroe, Sevier Co., Utah

Burial place: Monroe, Sevier Co., Utah

Johan was the son of Count Bernhard Frissenberg of Hesse and a cleaning maid named Maren Christensen. After Johan’s birth, his mother married Hans Henrik Christensen. Johan and his siblings grew up in Granslev parish, where he was confirmed in the Lutheran Church in 1842 (see Granslev, Viborg, Denmark Church Records, FHL #0053837, 155).

Apparently, the count never recognized Johan as his son. However, he did set up a trust fund for him so that he could attend the military academy in Austria and gain an education (see Knight, “Grandfather Johan Berhardt Hess,” 1).

Johan was baptized on 24 June 1858 at Randers (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 4:625). He was ordained a teacher in 1859, a priest in 1860, and an elder in 1861. He labored for two years as a local missionary in the Århus Conference and was sent as a missionary to Sweden, where he labored in the Skåne, Stockholm, and Sundsvall conferences. One of his important fields of labor was the Island of Gotland (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 120). From October 1866 to May 1868, he presided over the Stockholm Conference. In 1869, he was the assistant to the captain of the guard aboard the steamer Minnesota that sailed from Liverpool to New York (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 205, 484). After arriving in New York, he journeyed to Utah. By 1871, he had settled in Monroe, Sevier County, and was identified with the United Order in that community (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 120).

In Monroe, he was ordained a high priest in 1874 and called to be the first counselor in the Monroe Ward bishopric in the South Sevier Stake. Johan was a tailor by trade. He owned a cooperative store in Monroe and was the employer of Thomas Cooper (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 4:625).

He accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1882. Johan arrived in Copenhagen on 3 June 1882 and was assigned as a traveling elder and later as president of the Århus Conference from 1883 to 1884 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 267–68, 498). He delivered a message from Elder Albert Carrington, president of the European Mission, to Wilhelm I. Jacobson requesting that he help as many poor Latter-day Saint families as possible to immigrate to Utah (see Carter, Our Pioneer Heritage, 8:391). He departed from Copenhagen on 9 June 1884 aboard the steamer Milo. After arriving in Liverpool, he was appointed to lead a company of 531 Latter-day Saints aboard the Arizona bound for the United States (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 279). He died in 1910 at Monroe at age eighty-one.


Goudy (Goody) Hogan

(Gaute Erichsen)

1829–98

Residence: Orderville, Kane Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 24 September 1878

Missionary labors: Norway

Departure date from Copenhagen: 5 July 1880

Name of departure ship: Cato

Birth date: 16 September 1829

Birthplace: Haugen, Tinn, Telemark, Norway

Father: Gautesen (Haugen, Midtboen), Erik

Mother: Nestebø, Helga Knutsdatter

Spouse: Nelson, Christina

Marriage date: 24 December 1855

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Nelson, Bergetta

Marriage date: 24 December 1855

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Nelson, Ann

Marriage date: 1858

Death date: 29 January 1898

Death place: Richmond, Cache Co., Utah

Burial place: Richmond Cemetery, Richmond, Cache Co., Utah

As a baby, Goudy was christened by a Lutheran priest. He immigrated with his parents to the United States from Norway in 1837. They settled in Lee County, Iowa. In 1843, missionaries brought the gospel to the family. Goudy was baptized on 12 February 1843 (see Mills, “The Knud Nelson Family: From Denmark to America,” 1).

During the Nauvoo era, he remembered seeing Joseph Smith “in his light-colored linen coat, [and noticed] a small hole in each elbow of his coat sleeve.” He concluded that “[the Prophet] was not a proud man” (Derr, “Brief Notices,” BYU Studies, 33, no. 2, 365). Upon learning of Joseph Smith’s death, Goudy “wept like a child” (Mills, “The Knud Nelson Family: From Denmark to America,” 1).

His family sold their holdings in Iowa and journeyed with the Saints to the Salt Lake Valley, arriving on 22 September 1848. He and his family settled in what is now Woods Cross, Utah. Goudy didn’t remain long in the region, for he was recruited to accompany returning battalion men to California. Working as a teamster for the men enabled him to send money back to his family. After one year, he returned home and enjoyed attending school and working as a farmhand (see Mills, “The Knud Nelson Family: From Denmark to America,” 1).

At that time, Goudy was reported to be a tall, handsome youth with brown hair and kind, smiling eyes. Two sisters from a neighboring family were attracted to him. He married both on Christmas Eve in the Endowment House in 1855. The ceremonies were performed in the Danish language by Erastus Snow. Three years later, he married the third sister, Ann. Twenty-five children came from these marriages (see Mills, “The Knud Nelson Family: From Denmark to America,” 1).

In 1866, in cooperation with Christian Hyer, Goudy built a gristmill to manufacture flour and bran. The mill was located two miles northwest of Richmond. The mill was dedicated on 12 February 1867 by Ezra T. Benson (see Carter, Our Pioneer Heritage, 20:215; Carter, Heart Throbs of the West, 3:12).

Difficult financial problems arose in 1870. Goudy wrote, “I felt determined not to take the benefit of the bankrupt law as I could have done the same as some others but I consider that dishonest or too humiliating” (Carter, Our Pioneer Heritage, 14:60). In 1871, he wrote, “This was the first good crop that I have raised for seven years. I was very thankful to the Lord that He had given me wisdom to head off the destroyers (grasshoppers) once, for I stood in great need of a crop to help me out of debt. I felt that I was a free man once more” (Carter, Our Pioneer Heritage, 10:154).

In 1874, he was called by Brigham Young to southern Utah: “I had learned that it is profitable to accept all calls made of me by the authority of the Church.” Goudy was ordained a high priest and became bishop of the Leeds Ward on 13 April 1877. Of this call he wrote, “I put my trust in the Lord and did the best I could” (Mills, “The Knud Nelson Family: From Denmark to America,” 1; Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 4:593).

He accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1878. Wilford Woodruff promised him that “he would go in peace and return in safety.” He arrived in Copenhagen on 24 September 1878 and was assigned to labor in Norway. “Conference convened the day after my arrival, and I was called upon to speak in my native tongue. I found it very hard, but through the blessings of the Lord, I improved rapidly,” wrote Goudy. On his mission, he visited relatives and gathered much genealogical information. After completing this mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 5 July 1880 aboard the steamer Cato with 346 emigrating Latter-day Saints and other missionaries (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 244). “I had made many friends, and many tears were shed as I left my field of labor” (Mills, “The Knud Nelson Family: From Denmark to America,” 1).

After voyaging across the Atlantic Ocean and arriving in the States, he returned to his family in Orderville, Kane County, Utah. “The marshal band was out to meet me and welcome me home from my mission,” wrote Goudy (Mills, “The Knud Nelson Family: From Denmark to America,” 1). He went to work in the mill to support his family. In 1882, he purchased and modernized the mill (see Carter, Our Pioneer Heritage, 20:215).

On 25 November 1889, Goudy was sentenced to thirty days’ imprisonment for unlawful cohabitation by Judge Henderson of the first district court of Ogden (see Jenson, LDS Church Chronology, 25 November 1889). After serving for one month, on 25 December 1889, he was discharged from the penitentiary (see Jenson, LDS Church Chronology, 25 December 1889). Soon after, his health began to fail. He developed a severe rheumatic condition that caused him much pain and suffering for many years (see Mills, “The Knud Nelson Family: From Denmark to America,” 1). Goudy died in 1898 in Richmond at age sixty-eight.


Christian Hogensen

(Christen Haagensen)

1830–99

Residence: Montpelier, Bear Lake Co., Idaho

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 21 May 1880

Missionary labors: Christiania Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 16 June 1882

Name of departure ship: Albano

Birth date: 6 February 1830

Birthplace: Kirkerud, Lier, Buskerud, Norway

Father: Nielsen, Haagen

Mother: Olsdatter, Ingeborg

Spouse: Larsen, Karen Petria (Petra)

Marriage date: 6 May 1859

Marriage place: aboard William Tapscott

Spouse: Jensen, Mary

Marriage date: 2 August 1884

Marriage place: Logan Temple, Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Spouse: Olsen, Josephine

Death date: 16 December 1899

Death place: Montpelier, Bear Lake Co., Idaho

Burial place: Montpelier City Cemetery, Montpelier, Bear Lake Co., Idaho

Christian was the youngest of five children born to Haagen and Ingeborg Nielsen. He grew up on a small farm in Norway. As a young man, Christian moved from the farm to Drammen, where he fulfilled the Norwegian education requirements. While attending school, he also worked in a warehouse (see Matthews, History of Bear Lake Pioneers, 254).

Christian met his wife-to-be at a meeting after his baptism in 1859. She wanted to immigrate to Utah, and Christian agreed to loan her the money. They sailed together toward Zion on the William Tapscott in the spring of 1859. Aboard ship, they were married. They arrived in the Salt Lake Valley on 4 September 1859 in the George Rowley handcart company (see Matthews, History of Bear Lake Pioneers, 254–55).

The couple first settled in Logan, Cache County, Utah, before moving to Bear Lake Valley. After a few bad winters of living in a dugout in that valley, Christian moved his family to Richmond, Utah. After a year in Richmond, he and his family returned to Bear Lake Valley and settled in Montpelier, Bear Lake County. He said, “We were called to settle and build up Bear Lake Valley and here we will stay” (Matthews, History of Bear Lake Pioneers, 255).

Christian served as a home guard in the Black Hawk War (see Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, 487). In the 1860s, he helped build a meetinghouse in Montpelier. A ditch in Montpelier was named “Hogensen Ditch” (Carter, Heart Throbs of the West, 9:216). When General Authorities visited Montpelier, they stayed in his home and expressed their appreciation for his horses and “white topped buggy” (Perkins, “Life Story of Christian Hogensen,” 2).

Christian accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1880. He arrived in Copenhagen on 21 May 1880 and was called to preside over the Christiania Conference. After completing an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 16 June 1882 aboard the steamer Albano with 573 emigrating Latter-day Saints and fourteen other returning missionaries (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 250–51, 265).

His biographer noted that he was “a very intelligent, prosperous, and thrifty man. He had a staunch testimony of the truthfulness of the Gospel Plan. He was always ready and willing to help those in need” (Perkins, “Life Story of Christian Hogensen,” 3). In his declining years, he suffered greatly from arthritis. Christian died in 1899 at Montpelier at age sixty-nine.


Andrew Sorenson Hyrup

(Anders Sørensen Hyrup)

1854–1941

Residence: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 27 June 1890

Missionary labors: Århus Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 12 May 1892

Birth date: 8 August 1854

Birthplace: Brundbye, Tranebjærg, Holbæk, Denmark

Father: Hyrup, Søren S.

Mother: Andersdatter, Kjersten Marie

Spouse: Rasmussen, Karen

Marriage date: 17 November 1881

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Jensen, Nilsene Maria Eliasen

Marriage date: January 1928

Death date: 16 November 1941

Burial Place: Hyrum, Cache Co., Utah

When Anders was a resident of Århus, he listened to Latter-day Saint missionaries preach the Gospel of Jesus Christ. He left Århus bound for Australia in 1873. It was not until he was a resident of New Zealand that he was baptized on 22 January 1880 (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 122).

Anders left New Zealand for Melbourne, Australia. From Australia, he journeyed to England and then to Denmark to visit relatives and friends. He immigrated to America in 1880 and located in Logan, Cache County, Utah. He worked on the Logan Temple before moving to Manti, Sanpete County, in 1884, where he again worked on a temple (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 122).

In June 1889, while a resident of Salt Lake City, he was set apart for a mission to Denmark. He arrived in Copenhagen on 27 June 1890 and was assigned to labor in the Århus Conference. After completing an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 12 May 1892 with a company of sixty-four emigrating Latter-day Saints (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 316–17, 325). He returned to the States and settled once again in Salt Lake City. He died in 1941 of ailments incident to age. He had been ill for several months prior to his death at age eighty-seven. Funeral services were held in the Hawthorne Ward (see “Andrew S. Hyrup,” Deseret News, 17 November 1941).