D, E

Susan Easton Black, Shauna C. Anderson Young, and Ruth Ellen Maness, section D and E in Legacy of Sacrifice: Missionaries to Scandinavia, 1872–94 (Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, 2007), 93–108.

John Hansen Dahle

(John Hansen Lilledale)

1837–1920

Residence: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 21 May 1880

Missionary labors: Christiania Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 29 August 1881

Name of departure ship: Pacific

Birth date: 16 November 1837

Birthplace: Lille Dale, Kvinnherad, Hordaland, Norway

Father: Hansen, Hans

Mother: Johannesdatter, Anna

Spouse: Ingmann (Ingman), Jonetta (Janetta) Berntine

Marriage date: 9 June 1862

Marriage place: Aboard the Electric or on the plains

Death date: 14 October 1920

Death place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Burial place: Logan Cemetery, Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Traditionally, the name Dahle comes from a family farm meaning “little valley.” John’s father worked as a fisherman. Aboard his fishing boat Hertha, John first met Mormon missionaries. He accepted their message and was baptized on 12 October 1858 by Ole Orstad. Six months later, he was serving a home mission in his native Norway. After fulfilling that mission, he and his mother and brothers immigrated to America in 1862 aboard the Electric (see Dahle, The Johannes and John Dahle Families, 33).

On the journey, John married Janetta Ingmann, whom he had baptized in Norway. They crossed the plains and arrived in the Salt Lake Valley in October 1862. John “carried all his belongings under his arm” on the journey (Dahle, The Johannes and John Dahle Families, 33).

He and his wife resided in Bountiful, Davis County, for a short season before moving to Logan, Cache County. They were residing in Logan when John accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1880. At the time, his wife was expecting their ninth child (see Dahle, The Johannes and John Dahle Families, 33).

John arrived in Copenhagen on 21 May 1880 and was assigned to labor in the Christiania Conference. During this mission, he was arrested for administering the sacrament. He was “jailed and given only bread and water for ten days before he was released” (Dahle, The Johannes and John Dahle Families, 34). He departed from Copenhagen on 29 August 1881 aboard the steamer Pacific (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 250–51, 258).

After returning to Logan, John “was baptized into the United Order” and ordained a seventy in 1884. He served on the city council from 1899 to 1903. During these same years, he and his wife did temple work in the Logan Temple (see Dahle, The Johannes and John Dahle Families, 34). John died in October 1920 in Logan at age eighty-two.


John William Dahlquist

(Carl Johan Wilhelm Dalqvist)

1860–1904

Residence: Oakley, Cassia Co., Idaho

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 30 April 1889

Missionary labors: Göteborg Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 29 May 1890

Birth date: 24 February 1860

Birthplace: Vadstena, Östergotland, Sweden

Father: Dalqvist, Johannes Svensson

Mother: Persdotter, Brita Lisa

Spouse: Eliason, Clara Josephine

Marriage date: 10 December 1880

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 20 May 1904

Death place: Carey, Blaine Co., Idaho

Burial place: Oakley, Cassia Co., Idaho

John’s parents joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in April 1863, three years after he was born. John was blessed on 1 May 1863 in that same city, which belonged to the Linköping Branch. The family moved around for a while, probably due to John’s father’s occupation as a housepainter. The family moved to Stockholm in 1872 and eventually made their way to America.

John was baptized a member of the Church on 12 June 1875. In the 1900 census of the Oakley Precinct, Cassia County, Idaho, he gave his emigration year as 1872. He was a naturalized U.S. citizen.

John, a resident of Oakley, accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1889. He arrived in Copenhagen on 30 April 1889 and was assigned to labor in the Göteborg Conference. After fulfilling this mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 29 May 1890 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 310, 313, 315). The Oakley Ward records show that he was rebaptized and confirmed a member of the Church on 9 September 1894 (see Oakley Ward records, FHL 0007530).

While herding his sheep in the hills above Carey, Blaine County, Idaho, he contracted mountain, or spotted, fever. The disease developed into pneumonia. His wife arrived from Oakley, Cassia County, but he died from the disease on 20 May 1904 at age forty-four. His wife and ten children mourned his death. His remains were taken to Oakley for burial (see “Death’s Sad Harvest,” Deseret Evening News, 25 May 1904).


Christian Christiansen Dalby

(Christen Christiansen)

1824–1900

Residence: Big Cottonwood, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 1 November 1884

Missionary labors: Copenhagen Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 15 October 1885

Name of departure ship: Bravo

Birth date: 7 October 1824

Birthplace: Trustrup, Dølby, Viborg, Denmark

Father: Christensen, Christian

Mother: Christensdatter, Anne Marie

Spouse: Bruun, Hedwig

Marriage date: 10 January 1854

Marriage place: Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark

Spouse: Jensen, Ane Marie

Marriage date: 1869

Death date: 23 September 1900

Death place: Manti, Sanpete Co., Utah

Burial place: Manti, Sanpete Co., Utah

On 17 August 1850, Christian was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Copenhagen. He was the first Danish convert to receive the Melchizedek Priesthood, being ordained an elder on 1 January 1851 by Erastus Snow. He served as a missionary and as president of the Copenhagen Branch before immigrating to America in 1853 with his wife Hedwig Bruun (see Carter, Our Pioneer Heritage, 1:44).

After arriving in the United States, Christian served a mission in the St. Louis County, Missouri, area from 1854 to 1857. In 1856, he was appointed second counselor to the St. Louis Stake president and president of the Scandinavian Saints in that vicinity (see Carter, Our Pioneer Heritage, 1:44). Before journeying to Utah in 1857 in charge of a handcart company, Christian visited Latter-day Saints in Iowa and Illinois. He reported in his diary that he saw two mummies brought from Egypt, supposedly a pharaoh and his daughter, on display in Nauvoo (see Bitton, Guide to Mormon Diaries and Autobiographies, 66). His handcart company arrived in the Salt Lake Valley on 13 September 1857 (see Carter, Our Pioneer Heritage, 1:44).

From 1865 to 1867, Christian served another mission to Scandinavia. After this mission, he settled in Levan, Juab County, Utah. He was the presiding elder of the Levan Branch from 1876 to 1877. From 1880 to 1881, he worked on railroads in Colorado and Arizona (see Bitton, Guide to Mormon Diaries and Autobiographies, 66).

In 1884, Christian accepted a third mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 1 November 1884 and was assigned to labor in the Copenhagen Conference. Part of his mission was to preside over the Århus Conference. He departed from Copenhagen on 15 October 1885 aboard the steamer Bravo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 292).

In 1888, he was called to be an ordinance worker in the Manti Temple. The remainder of his life was involved in temple and genealogical work (see Bitton, Guide to Mormon Diaries and Autobiographies, 66). He died in 1900 in Manti, Sanpete County, at age seventy-five.


John Waldemar Dehlin

1868–1934

Residence: Mount Pleasant, Sanpete Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 6 June 1892

Missionary labors: Skåne and Stockholm conferences

Departure date from Copenhagen: 19 July 1894

Name of departure ship: Rona

Birth date: 23 April 1868

Birthplace: Mount Pleasant, Sanpete Co., Utah

Father: Dehlin, Paul Paulsen

Mother: Waldemar, Elna

Spouse: Taylor, Blanche Hortense

Marriage date: 25 November 1896

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 20 November 1934

Death place: Glen Canyon, Kane Co., Utah

Burial place: Glen Canyon, Kane Co., Utah

John’s parents joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and immigrated to the United States in 1863. They were living in Mount Pleasant, Sanpete County, where John was born. He was blessed as a child on 4 June 1868 and was baptized a member of the Church in 1876.

John accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1892. He arrived in Copenhagen on 6 June 1892 and was assigned to labor in the Skåne and Stockholm conferences. These conferences covered the same area in which his father had served thirty years before. Unlike his father, John was a talented musician and shared his violin playing on many occasions on this mission. After completing an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 19 July 1894 aboard the steamer Rona (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 328–29, 337).

After John returned from his mission, he rented a home at 227 North 600 West. He worked as a warehouseman for a time in Salt Lake City. He died in 1934 at Glen Canyon, Kane County, Utah, at age sixty-six.


Paul Paulsen Dehlin

(Påhl Åkesson)

1830–75

Residence: Mount Pleasant, Sanpete Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 6 May 1871

Missionary labors: Skåne Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 27 June 1873

Name of departure ship: Pacific

Birth date: 4 May 1830

Birthplace: Trä #3, Norrvidinge, Malmöhus, Sweden

Father: Pedrillo, Åke Påhlsson

Mother: Jönsdotter, Anna

Spouse: Waldemar, Elna

Marriage date: 1859

Marriage place: Mount Pleasant, Sanpete Co., Utah

Spouse: Hansen, Julia Sarah Marie

Marriage date: 28 March 1870

Death date: 6 June 1875

Death place: Mount Pleasant, Sanpete Co., Utah

Burial place: Mount Pleasant City Cemetery, Mount Pleasant, Sanpete Co., Utah

As a young man, Paul learned the cabinetmaking and masonry trades. He gained employment as a journeyman, contractor, and builder in Malmöhus, Sweden, before hearing Mormon missionaries preach. Paul accepted their teachings and was baptized in 1855 by Niels Adler. He was the first member of his family to join the Church and was instrumental in the conversion of three of his sisters and his mother. He served a local mission in Sweden and was jailed for preaching the gospel in his homeland before he sailed to America in 1859 (see Hampshire, “Paul Paulsen Dehlin—Biographical Sketch,” 1).

He and his wife Elna sold their jewelry to purchase a wagon and an ox team to cross the plains with the Robert F. Nelsen company. They and their children, her parents, two brothers, and one sister made the arduous journey to the Salt Lake Valley, arriving on 15 September 1859. They settled in Mount Pleasant, Sanpete County, where Paul opened the largest furniture business outside of Salt Lake City. He proved to be a good businessman and became a member of the city council and director of the Mount Pleasant Co-op (see Hampshire, “Paul Paulsen Dehlin—Biographical Sketch,” 1).

In 1871, Paul accepted a mission call to Scandinavia to preside over the Skåne Conference. On the mission he contracted smallpox. His daughter wrote that he was “a solid mass from head to foot, and when the mass peeled off[,] all of the hair on his head came off with it, leaving him entirely bald.” President Peterson forbade anyone to see him except two people whom he had set apart to take care of him. They never contracted the disease, but someone else who visited caught the dreaded illness and died. Despite his bout with smallpox, Paul served a successful two-year mission in which he said he “never felt better in his life” (Hampshire, “Paul Paulsen Dehlin—Biographical Sketch,” 2).

He sailed from Copenhagen on 27 June 1873 aboard the steamer Pacific to England. From England he voyaged on the Wisconsin to the United States. He arrived in New York Harbor on 15 July 1873 and at his home in Mount Pleasant on 24 July 1873. After being home for nearly two years, he contracted typhoid fever. Paul died on 6 June 1875 at age forty-five. He is remembered by his posterity as “being loved by all and . . . generous with those in need” (Hampshire, “Paul Paulsen Dehlin—Biographical Sketch,” 1–4).


Charles Rolfson Dorius

1858–1937

Residence: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 2 November 1886

Missionary labors: Christiania Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 24 May 1888

Name of departure ship: Milo

Birth date: 10 July 1858

Birthplace: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

Father: Dorius, Carl Christian Nicoli

Mother: Rolfson, Ellen Gurine

Spouse: Nielsen, Margaret

Marriage date: 11 December 1879

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 1 September 1937

Death place: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

Burial place: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

Charles was baptized at age eight. His journal records that during his teenage years, he witnessed two powers—Satan and the Holy Ghost—and was imbued with the joy of the Spirit of God that never left him (see “Journal of Charles Rolfson Dorius,” 4).

While still in his youth, he had a vision of a huge field of ripe grain, which he interpreted as meaning that he would serve a mission. But that mission needed to wait. From 1875 to 1879, he was employed as a freight deliverer. He next worked at odd jobs but didn’t make much money, partly because he lacked a formal education. In January 1884, he enrolled in Brigham Young Academy but stayed in classes only until spring (see “Journal of Charles Rolfson Dorius,” 4–5).

Charles served a mission to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 2 November 1886 and was assigned to labor in the Christiania Conference. On this mission, it was difficult for him to find investigators. In his journal, he records that “it was poor picking in the branch.” He further records his grief upon learning of his daughter’s death: “God in His wise providence saw fit to let my little daughter Ellen 2 ½ years pass from this life of sorrow . . . to dwell among the pure. Sweet may be her sleep” (correspondence from Carolyn Clyde Mollinet, 16 July 1999). Despite these trials, Charles recalls, “My mission always seems a bright spot in my life” (“Journal of Charles Rolfson Dorius,” 5). After completing an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 24 May 1888 aboard the steamer Milo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 299–300, 305).

In 1890, he received his degree from Brigham Young Academy. After graduation he held responsible positions in the community and in the Church. He taught school for four years and was elected to be a state representative to the Utah legislature in 1907 and again in 1909. He also served as city treasurer, school trustee, and mayor (see correspondence from Carolyn Clyde Mollinet, July 16, 1999).

He was bishop in the Ephraim South Ward for twenty-three years—a position once held by his father. In addition, he served as an alternate member of the high council of the South Sanpete Stake. He was later ordained a patriarch and served as a temple worker. Toward the end of his life, he suffered from diabetes (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 2:615). He died in 1937 in Ephraim at age seventy-nine.


John Frederik Ferdinand Dorius

(Johan Friderich Ferdinandt Dorius)

1832–1901

Residence: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 1860; 3 June 1876

Missionary labors: Christiania Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 30 April 1863; 24 June 1878

Name of departure ship: Cameo

Birth date: 15 June 1832

Birthplace: Rigonsgade #472, Trinitatis-Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark

Father: Dorius, Nicolai

Mother: Christoffersdatter, Ane Sophie

Spouse: Frantzen, Karen (Caroline)

Marriage date: 24 April 1857

Marriage place: aboard Westmoreland

Spouse: Torgensen, Gunild Ryerisen Evensen

Marriage date: 5 December 1863

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Jorgensen, Anna Marie Staalesen

Marriage date: 11 May 1874

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 18 July 1901

Death place: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

Burial place: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

Johan learned the trade of shoemaking before being baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on 14 December 1850 by Christen Christensen. He and his father and sister were among the first to be baptized in Denmark. “I felt fortunate and happy for that which had happened to me,” said Johan. After his baptism, he served as a local missionary for seven years in Norway and Denmark. He is credited with being the first missionary to preach on the island of Falster (Maribo County). In Falster he “suffered imprisonment and much persecution for the gospel’s sake” (Dorius, The Dorius Heritage, 14; see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 92).

Johan immigrated to America in 1857 aboard the Westmoreland with 536 Scandinavian Latter-day Saints. After arriving in the United States, he crossed the plains with a handcart company to reach the Salt Lake Valley. By 1858, he was residing in Ephraim, Sanpete County (see Dorius, The Dorius Heritage, 82).

In 1860, Johan was called on a mission to Scandinavia. Of his call, he wrote, “I earnestly prayed to my Father in Heaven, to take care of my wife and child, during this absence.” He journeyed to Scandinavia with his brother, Carl, and forty-seven other missionaries. He and his brother were assigned to labor in Norway. He served as a counselor to his brother, C. C. N. Dorius, who was president of the Christiania Conference. Johan was honorably released from the mission on 13 January 1863 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 151, 153, 170, 176, 178–79).

Returning to Utah, he was employed at the co-op store in Ephraim (see History of Sanpete and Emery Counties, Utah, 309). Then in 1877, he accepted another mission call to Scandinavia. He served as a traveling elder and president of the Christiania Conference. During this mission, Johan traveled widely and spoke often in public settings about the gospel. He worked part-time as a shoemaker, leaving Mormon tracts in the shoes he repaired (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 226, 232).

Johan served two additional missions for the Church. He served in the northern states from 1896 to 1897 and from 1898 to 1899. On these missions he proselyted among the Scandinavians who had settled in Chicago. Some converts were made, but progress was slow. He wrote, “I look upon my life in this way: Once called on a mission, always on a mission. If God will strengthen me, my greatest wish shall be to exercise a saving influence upon everyone, whether at home or abroad” (Dorius, The Dorius Heritage, 183).

In the intervening years, he was the senior president of the Forty-seventh Quorum of the Seventy until his death in 1901 in Ephraim at age sixty-nine (see History of Sanpete and Emery Counties, Utah, 309).


Carl August Ek

(Carl August Larsson)

1845–1912

Residence: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 6 November 1882

Missionary labors: Stockholm Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 17 October 1884

Name of departure ship: Bravo

Birth date: 10 July 1845

Birthplace: Skokloster, Uppsala, Sweden

Father: Säf, Lars Larsson

Mother: Lundvall, Brita Christina

Spouse: Ekstrom, Matilda Christina

Marriage date: 10 October 1878

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Anderson, Mary

Marriage date: August 1885

Marriage place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Spouse: Quist, Hildegard Augusta

Marriage date: 10 November 1904

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 8 November 1912

Death place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Burial place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

On 23 April 1871, Carl was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. On 1 October 1872, he was ordained an elder and was called to serve a local mission. Despite his status as a recent convert, he served as president of the Örebro Branch from 1873 to 1875 and president of the Stockholm Branch from 1875 to 1878 (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:686).

In 1878, he immigrated to America and arrived in the Salt Lake Valley on 1 July 1878. He settled in Logan, Cache County, where he was employed as a stonecutter on the Logan Temple and as Cache County sheriff (see Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, 856).

In 1882, Carl was called to serve a mission in Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 6 November 1882 and was assigned to labor in the Stockholm Conference—first as a traveling elder and then as president. When sailing from Denmark on 17 October 1884 aboard the steamer Bravo, he was in charge of the emigrating Latter-day Saints (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 267–68, 276, 279).

After returning to Utah, he was ordained a Seventy. In 1889, he was called as a president of the 110th Quorum of the Seventy. In 1894, he moved from Logan to Salt Lake City. On 20 January 1902, he was ordained bishop of the Salt Lake Twenty-fifth Ward. He served for eleven years (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:687). Carl died in 1912 in Salt Lake City at age sixty-seven.


John August Ekmann

(Johan August Magnusson)

1833–1906

Residence: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 27 November 1877

Missionary labors: Stockholm Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 23 June 1879

Name of departure ship: Cato

Birth date: 15 December 1833

Birthplace: Källeryd, Hogstad, Östergötland, Sweden

Father: Ek, Magnus

Mother: Nilsdotter, Eva Christina

Spouse: Segestrom, Johanna Emela

Marriage date: 15 January 1872

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Erickson, Ebba

Marriage date: 26 October 1876

Spouse: Andersdotter, Gustava

Marriage date: 26 October 1876

Spouse: Ericsson, Johanna

Marriage date: 26 October 1876

Spouse: Nilsdotter, Anna

Marriage date: 26 October 1876

Spouse: Hedberg, Anna

Marriage date: about 1882

Death date: 11 July 1906

Death place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Burial place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

John was the son of a soldier and was a tailor by trade. He was baptized into The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on 15 February 1864. Five years later, he immigrated to America and settled in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah. He helped build the railroad from Salt Lake City to Ogden, Weber County. However, his main source of income came from his tailor shop located in the Constitution Building near ZCMI. John was a member of “The United Order of Tailors,” a subgroup of the United Order (see Fisher, “My Ancestry,” 1–6).

On 13 October 1875, he became a United States citizen. Two years later, he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. His mission proved a hardship for himself and his family. His wife Johanna supported the family by selling milk and eggs. During his mission, John was jailed for preaching. However, he was successful in obtaining his genealogical records (see Fisher, “My Ancestry,” 9–10). He departed from Copenhagen on 23 June 1879 aboard the Cato and arrived on 18 July 1879 in the Salt Lake Valley (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 240). John died in 1906 in the valley at age seventy-two.


Anders Peter Eliason

1841–1911

Residence: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 4 May 1885

Missionary labors: Göteborg Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 7 April 1887

Name of departure ship: Panther

Birth date: 23 December 1841

Birthplace: Högången, Lena, Älvsborg, Sweden

Father: Hansson, Elias

Mother: Eliasdotter, Elin

Spouse: Eriksson, Anna Marie

Marriage date: 12 September 1863

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 4 March 1911

Death place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Burial place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

When Anders’s father died, Anders’s mother was unable to support all of her children. Anders lived in a poorhouse from seven to fourteen years old. After that he worked for two abusive women, then for a fisherman. He was later employed by a family by the name of Eliasson. A young woman, Anna Marie Eriksson, also worked for the Eliasson family. Anders and Anna were baptized members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in March 1863. Together they immigrated to America and then crossed the plains with the Joseph Young company (see Larsen, “Andreas Peter Eliason,” 1).

They were married when they reached Salt Lake City on Sunday 12 September 1863 by Joseph Young. Their first home was a dugout in the city. Eventually they settled in Logan, Cache County, where Anders helped build the Logan Temple and Logan Tabernacle, as well as local roads, canals, and meetinghouses. He also worked on the railroad (see Larsen, “Andreas Peter Eliason,” 1).

Anna and Anders faced many difficulties in their new country. One day Anders was herding cattle and found himself surrounded by “yelping Indians” who threatened to scalp him. He prayed for help. A friendly Indian appeared and told the others to leave him alone. Although the Indians never bothered Anders again, his trials were far from over. For three months, his family was quarantined for smallpox. Because no one could approach them, their food supply ran low. The local doctor and mayor recommended that they go to the “pest house,” a shanty near the cemetery, but they refused. Their home was fumigated with carbolic acid, which destroyed their clothing, rugs, and bedding (see Larsen, “Andreas Peter Eliason,” 1).

Despite these hardships, when Anders was called on a mission to Scandinavia in 1885, Anna encouraged him to go and worked to support him. While he was in Sweden, he asked his mother to return to America with him. She declined, however (see Larsen, “Andreas Peter Eliason,” 1), and he departed from Copenhagen on 7 April 1887 aboard the steamer Panther (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 293, 295, 302).

When he returned to Cache Valley, he was recognized as the strongest man in the valley. It was reported that he could wrestle three men at once (see Larsen, “Andreas Peter Eliason,” 1).

In 1894, Anders built a brick house at 207 West 200 North in Logan. He died in 1911 in Logan at age sixty-nine, after breaking his hip while stacking hay (see Walker, “Anna Marie [Eriksdatter] Peterson,” 1).

Andrew Eliason, Jr.

(Andreas Andersson)

1838–1926

Residence: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 1 September 1881

Missionary labors: Göteborg Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 15 June 1883

Name of departure ship: Pacific (Milo)

Birth date: 14 March 1838

Birthplace: Enerkullen, Alingsås, Älvsborg, Sweden

Father: Eliasson, Anders

Mother: Larsdotter, Annicka Christina

Spouse: Carlson, Hedvig

Marriage date: 5 June 1860

Death date: 16 September 1926

Death place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Burial place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Andrew lived in affluent circumstances in Sweden. He was raised on an estate, which was eventually sold to Lord Dixon of England. He and his parents were members of the Lutheran Church when Mormon missionaries taught them the gospel in 1863. His parents immigrated to America and settled in Grantsville, Tooele County, Utah (see “Funeral Services for Andrew Eliason,” Logan Journal, 18 September 1926).

Andrew did not immediately join his parents. He labored in Göteborg assisting other converts with emigration. It was not until 1865 that he departed for Zion. He immigrated to America from Liverpool aboard the BS Kimball. After arriving in New York Harbor, he boarded a train for Nebraska and crossed the plains with the Miner G. Atwood company. Andrew eventually joined extended family members in Grantsville. In that community he worked for a time as a rancher, but the employment proved unsatisfactory. By 1876, he had left the arid region to settle in Logan, Cache County (see Carter, Heart Throbs of the West, 4:351).

In 1881, Andrew accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 1 September 1881 and was assigned to labor in the Göteborg Conference. Upon completing this mission, he sailed from Copenhagen on 15 June 1883 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 262, 264, 269).

His biographer said of him, “He had love in his heart for all and had not an enemy in the world.” He died in 1926 in Logan at age eighty-eight. His funeral service was held in the Logan Tabernacle (see “Funeral Services for Andrew Eliason,” Logan Journal, 18 September 1926).

Charles Carl Eliason

(Carl Andersson)

1833–1916

Residence: Millville, Cache Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 14 June 1887

Missionary labors: Göteborg Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 30 May 1889

Name of departure ship: Milo

Birth date: 4 April 1833

Birthplace: Enerkullen, Alingsås, Älvsborg, Sweden

Father: Eliasson, Anders

Mother: Larsdotter, Annika Christina

Spouse: Anderson, Anna Britta

Death date: 19 November 1916

Death place: Millville (Logan), Cache Co., Utah

Charles was baptized by Christian Hollberg on 13 April 1863. He immigrated to America in 1865 and settled in Grantsville, Tooele County, Utah, before moving to Millville, Cache County, where he became a farmer. While residing in Millville, he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1887. He arrived in Copenhagen on 14 June 1887 and was assigned to labor in the Göteborg Conference. After serving an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 30 May 1889 aboard the steamer Milo with 239 emigrating Latter-day Saints and twelve other returning missionaries (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 304–5, 309).

Charles died in 1916 at age eighty-three from troubles incident to old age. His wife had passed away twenty months previous. His funeral was held in the Millville meetinghouse (see “Charles Eliason,” The Journal/Tri-weekly, 18–25 November 1916).


John Alfred Eliason

(Johan Alfred Andersson)

1854–1920

Residence: Grantsville, Tooele Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 18 November 1884

Missionary labors: Göteborg Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 7 October 1886

Name of departure ship: Milo

Birth date: 25 January 1854

Birthplace: Enerkullen, Alingsås, Älvsborg, Sweden

Father: Eliasson, Anders

Mother: Carlsdotter, Christina

Spouse: Clark, Lucy Ann Micklewright

Marriage date: 23 February 1882

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 30 April 1920

Death place: Grantsville, Tooele Co., Utah

Burial place: Grantsville, Tooele Co., Utah

John was raised in a family that was “blessed with the necessities of life as well as many of the luxuries.” His parents joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and helped many converts immigrate to America before they made their journey aboard the BS Kimball. They crossed the plains in the John R. Young company and arrived in the Salt Lake Valley on 12 September 1863 (see York, “John Alfred Eliason,” 1).

John and his family resided in a log house in Tooele County, Utah. John was baptized on 17 September 1864 and became a United States citizen at age twenty-three. He married in 1882 and supported his family as a farmer and sheep rancher in Grantsville, Tooele County (see York, “John Alfred Eliason,” 2).

When his wife was expecting their second child, John accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 18 November 1884 and was assigned to labor in the Göteborg Conference. After completing a successful mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 7 October 1886 aboard the steamer Milo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 282–83, 290).

John’s niece remembers John as “a very kind, generous and loving man” who “didn’t have much to say.” A former employee recalls “Alf” as a generous and honest employer and as a resourceful farmer. For example, one year he plowed his sugar beet field while it was wet, leaving hard clods of dried mud all over it. To break up the clods, he devised a homemade leveler by tying sacks of grain to the leveler to weigh it down. After he went around the field with the leveler to smooth out the clods, the grain sacks wore out, releasing grain that seeded the field (see York, “John Alfred Eliason,” 2–4). John died of dropsy in 1920 in Grantsville at age sixty-six.


Ole Ellingsen

1831–1903

Residence: Lehi, Utah Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 11 September 1878

Missionary labors: Christiania Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 5 July 1880

Name of departure ship: Cato

Birth date: 28 February 1831

Birthplace: Søndre Veum, Glemmen, Østfold, Norway

Father: Hansen, Elling

Mother: Jensdatter, Inger Kirstine

Spouse: Evans, Abigail

Marriage date: 1 November 1861

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 29 August 1903

Death place: Lehi, Utah Co., Utah

Burial place: Lehi Cemetery, Lehi, Utah Co., Utah

Ole was an early resident of Fort Lehi, Utah County. He defended the community of Lehi against Indian attacks (see Van Wagoner, Lehi: Portraits of a Utah Town, 10).

In 1878 he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 11 September 1878 and was assigned to labor in the Christiania Conference. After serving an honorable mission, he sailed from Copenhagen on 5 July 1880 aboard the steamer Cato. He voyaged with 346 emigrating Latter-day Saints and several returning missionaries (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 235–36, 244).

After arriving in Lehi on 12 February 1883, Ole was elected mayor of the community. He served as mayor from 1883 to 1887 and from 1893 to 1895. He is remembered for his valuable insights into the banking and business practices of the community (see Gardner, History of Lehi, 227–28). Ole died in 1905 in Lehi at age seventy-two.


Elof George Erickson

1858–1925

Residence: Grantsville, Tooele Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 6 June 1888

Missionary labors: Göteborg Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 24 April 1890

Name of departure ship: Cameo

Birth date: 24 September 1858

Birthplace: Tollered Skattegård, Hemsjö, Älvsborg, Sweden

Father: Eriksson, Erick

Mother: Jonasdotter, Anna Christina

Spouse: Olson, Matilda

Marriage date: 17 August 1882

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 12 April 1925

Death place: Grantsville, Tooele Co., Utah

Burial place: Grantsville, Tooele Co., Utah

Elof and his parents immigrated to America in 1862 and settled in Grantsville, Tooele County, Utah. In that community, Elof was baptized on 29 March 1867 by John Clark (see Lund, Scandinavia Jubilee Album, 96).

He married Matilda Olson in 1882, and by 1888 when he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia, they had two children. He arrived in Copenhagen on 6 June 1888 and was assigned to labor in the Göteborg Conference. On the mission he kept a detailed journal recording his loneliness. He was particularly lonely on his thirtieth birthday (see Reed, “George Elof Erickson,” 1). He served as a traveling elder in the Norrköping (Östergotland County), Vingåker (Södermanland County), and Kalmar (Kalmar County) branches, and later as president of the Gothenburg Branch (Göteborg County). Elof departed from Copenhagen on 24 April 1890 aboard the Cameo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 307–13).

Returning to Grantsville, he supported his family by farming and shepherding, often pasturing the sheep on the hills above town. One day, as he returned from tending sheep, his wife handed him a cross baby to hold. He quipped, “I’ll have to remember not to come down on wash Mondays anymore” (Reed, “George Elof Erickson,” 2).

He and his family moved to Oakley, Cassia County, Idaho, hoping to better their financial circumstances. Not succeeding, they returned to Grantsville. In that community, Elof was known for his gift of healing. He was often called upon to minister to the sick. During the influenza epidemic of 1918, when so many died, he administered to many but never contracted the flu. He was also known in Grantsville as “Honest Elof.” He served his community as the city marshal and as the sexton of the Grantsville Cemetery (see Reed, “George Elof Erickson,” 2–3). He died in 1925 in Grantsville at age sixty-six.


Emil Erickson

(Carl Johan Emil Andersson)

1858–1936

Residence: Spring City, Sanpete Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 4 May 1883

Missionary labors: Göteborg Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 15 June 1885

Name of departure ship: Panther

Birth date: 2 September 1858

Birthplace: Högby Ödegårdsegor, Högby, Östergötland, Sweden

Father: Jönsson, Anders Johan

Mother: Andersdotter, Anna Greta

Spouse: Larsen, Anna Maria

Marriage date: 18 November 1880

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 20 July 1936

Death place: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

Burial place: Spring City, Sanpete Co., Utah

Carl and his family immigrated to America in 1863 and crossed the plains with an ox team company to reach the Salt Lake Valley. They settled in Fountain Green, Sanpete County, before moving in 1864 to Spring City, Sanpete County, and in 1865 to Richfield, Sevier County. Troubles with Native Americans caused the family to return to Spring City in 1868 after losing nearly everything they owned (see History of Sanpete and Emery Counties, Utah, 494).

Carl was called on a mission to Scandinavia in 1883. He arrived in Copenhagen on 4 May 1883 and was assigned to labor in the Göteborg Conference (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 273, 275). During his mission, he served as a branch president (see History of Sanpete and Emery Counties, Utah, 494). Upon completion of that mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 15 June 1885 aboard the steamer Panther (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 290).

Returning to Spring City, Carl engaged in farming and carpentry until 1889. He then opened a general store with Lewis Olson. The store was incorporated into the Young Men’s Co-op with Carl as director, manager, and secretary. In his later years, he served on the city council for a term, as city recorder for two years, and as a school trustee for eight years (see History of Sanpete and Emery Counties, Utah, 494).

He then moved to South Cottonwood, Salt Lake County. While a resident of that community, he accepted another mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 20 June 1899 and was assigned to labor in the Stockholm Conference (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 372, 374).

At the time of his death, Carl was the Sanpete County recorder. He died suddenly of an acute heart ailment on 20 July 1936 at age seventy-seven (see “Emil Erickson Succumbs to Heart Attack,” Ephraim Enterprise, 24 July 1936).


Erick Erickson

1837–1912

Residence: Heber City, Wasatch Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 6 November 1892

Missionary labors: Stockholm Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 16 August 1894

Name of departure ship: Rona

Birth date: 23 April 1837

Birthplace: Sandvreten, Österhaninge, Stockholm, Sweden

Father: Gabrielsson, Erik

Mother: Sjöholm, Anna Lisa

Spouse: Anderson, Anna Maria

Marriage date: 16 October 1865

Death date: 27 November 1912

Death place: Heber, Wasatch Co., Utah

Burial place: Heber, Wasatch Co., Utah

In 1870, Mormon missionaries baptized Erick and his wife. Two years later, the Ericksons departed from Sweden bound for America. They settled in Alta, Salt Lake County, Utah, before moving to Heber, Wasatch County, in 1874. Erick supported his family by farming. He was very popular at Swedish gatherings, delighting friends with his feats of strength (see Mortimer, How Beautiful Upon the Mountains, A Centennial History of Wasatch County, 352).

While a resident of Heber, Erick accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1892. He arrived in Copenhagen on 6 November 1892 and was assigned to labor in the Stockholm Conference. After completing an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 16 August 1894 aboard the steamer Rona with fifteen converts and another missionary (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 328–29, 337).

Erick died from cancer in 1912 at his home in Heber at age seventy-five. Although he had been operated on in the Provo General Hospital to remove the cancer from his neck, surgeons discovered the cancer had spread. His funeral was held at the Wasatch Stake meetinghouse (see “Erick Erickson, Deceased,” Wasatch Wave, 29 November 1912).


Erick Gustave Erickson

(Erik Gustaf Eriksson)

1850–1918

Residence: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 23 September 1885

Missionary labors: Göteborg Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 21 June 1886

Name of departure ship: Otto

Birth date: 18 August 1850

Birthplace: Logsjöskogen, Edsberg, Örebro, Sweden

Father: Jansson, Erik

Mother: Axelsdotter, Stina Kaisa

Spouse: Anderson, Maria Christina

Marriage date: 3 August 1874

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 15 October 1918

Death place: Koosharem, Piute Co., Utah

Burial place: Koosharem, Piute Co., Utah

Erick was baptized on 6 October 1872 and immigrated to the United States in 1874. He settled in Sanpete County, Utah, before moving to Sevier County. He engaged in farming and raising stock in both counties (see Alter, Utah, the Storied Domain, 3:164). Erick received his endowment on 3 August 1874 in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City (see Temple Index Bureau).

While a resident of Salt Lake City, he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1885. He arrived in Copenhagen on 23 September 1885 and was assigned to labor in the Göteborg Conference. After serving an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 21 June 1886 aboard the steamer Otto (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 294–95, 297). He died in 1918 in Koosharem, Piute County, Utah, at age sixty-six.


Bendt Jensen Eriksen

(Bent Jensen)

1832–1904

Residence: Bear River City, Box Elder Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 2 December 1876

Missionary labors: Copenhagen Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 21 June 1878

Name of departure ship: Humber

Birth date: 18 October 1832

Birthplace: Vassingerød, Uggeløse, Frederiksborg, Denmark

Father: Eriksen, Jens Christian

Mother: Bentsdatter, Dorthe

Spouse: Hilda

Spouse: Jurtsen, Anna Sophia

Marriage date: about 1865

Marriage place: Farmington, Davis Co., Utah

Spouse: Jepperson (Petersen), Anna Christene

Marriage date: 23 June 1866

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Olsen, Ellen

Marriage date: 23 June 1866

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Jonasson, Ellen Christine Dorothea

Marriage date: 14 March 1870

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Fredericksen, Mary

Marriage date: 4 May 1870

Spouse: Danielsen, Anna Sophia

Marriage date: 15 November 1878

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 29 October 1904

Death place: Preston, Franklin Co., Idaho

Burial place: Preston, Franklin Co., Idaho

Bendt grew to manhood in Copenhagen. In his early twenties, he married and had three children. Unfortunately, his wife and children died in an epidemic. After their death, Bendt listened to Mormon missionaries and was baptized in 1851. He remained in his homeland as a missionary and Church leader for twelve years before immigrating to America aboard the Louis Napoleon. On the voyage, the vessel caught fire in the Atlantic Ocean. With other passengers he waited for three days in a small lifeboat before being rescued. When he arrived in New York Harbor, he was without baggage and nearly penniless (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 4:129–30).

He paid for his journey to the west by working a few days and using his earnings to move farther west. He arrived in the Salt Lake Valley with an ox team company. He was sent by Brigham Young to colonize Milton, Bear Lake County, Idaho. Later he settled in Box Elder and Cache counties before making his home in Preston, Franklin County, Idaho. Even by pioneer standards, he and his family were poor. Bread and milk was the usual evening meal (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 4:129–30).

His first mission call was to the Navajo Indians in Arizona in 1870. In 1876, he was called to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 2 December 1876 and was assigned to labor in the Copenhagen Conference. Upon completing this mission, Bendt was given the responsibility for Latter-day Saints voyaging aboard the Humber. The vessel arrived in Hull, England, on 24 June 1878 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 232).

He served a second mission to Scandinavia. For many years he was president of the Scandinavian organization of the Oneida Stake. He is remembered for traveling among the small communities of southern Idaho, giving temporal and spiritual assistance to foreigners. His biographer wrote of him, “Moral courage, a fine sense of justice, undying devotion to his family, his community and his church, marked his career” (Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 4:129–30). He died in 1906 in Preston at age seventy-three.


Hans Eriksen

(Hans Sørensen)

1844–1924

Residence: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 28 November 1889

Missionary labors: Stockholm Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 6 August 1891

Birth date: 11 April 1844

Birthplace: Mørkholt, Gårslev, Vejle, Denmark

Father: Eriksen, Søren

Mother: Kyhn, Bodil Kirstine Hansdatter

Spouse: Petersen, Karin

Marriage date: 21 July 1878

Marriage place: Willard, Box Elder Co., Utah

Death date: 12 November 1924

Death place: Weston, Franklin Co., Idaho

Burial place: Weston, Franklin Co., Idaho

Although his parents joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in 1860, Hans was not baptized until 28 June 1875. He was the last member of his family to join the Church. He was ordained an elder on 2 October 1875 and served as a local missionary in the Norrland and Jämtland branches until 1877, when he immigrated to America (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 96).

After settling in Utah, Hans spent six years as a mason on the Logan Temple. On 5 November 1889, he was ordained a Seventy by Abraham Cannon and was called on a mission to Scandinavia (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 96). He arrived in Copenhagen on 28 November 1889 and was assigned to labor in the Stockholm Conference. During the mission, he baptized forty-five individuals in the Norrland region before departing from Copenhagen on 6 August 1891 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 311–12, 319). After the mission, Hans resided in Weston, Franklin County, Idaho. He died in 1924 in that community at age eighty.


Swen Erikson

1825–1914

Residence: Grantsville, Tooele Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 6 October 1880

Missionary labors: Göteborg Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 16 June 1882

Name of departure ship: Albano (Bravo)

Birth date: 6 April 1825

Birthplace: Bäck, Hemsjö, Älvsborg, Sweden

Father: Olofsson, Erik

Mother: Eriksdotter, Anna

Spouse: Bengtson, Maria Christina (Kristina)

Marriage date: about 1853

Marriage place: Borås, Älvsborg, Sweden

Spouse: Anderson, Augusta

Marriage date: about 1885

Death date: 3 December 1914

Death place: Grantsville, Tooele Co., Utah

Burial place: Grantsville, Tooele Co., Utah

When his daughter, Emma, was taken to the local Lutheran minister to be baptized and she died of pneumonia from the exposure, Swen and his wife sought comfort in the message of Mormon missionaries. Swen was baptized on 29 May 1863. He and his family attended the Göteborg Branch before immigrating to America in spring 1864. They sailed aboard the Monarch of the Sea for America with 974 Latter-day Saints under the leadership of John Smith. They journeyed with the Isaac A. Canfield pioneering company to the Salt Lake Valley and arrived on 5 October 1864 (see Carroll, “Westover Magazine Family History,” 1–2).

Since they had many friends in Grantsville, Tooele County, Utah, Swen and his family settled in that community. There he worked as a cabinetmaker until accepting a call to work on the St. George Temple (see Carroll, “Westover Magazine Family History,” 2).

When the temple was completed, Swen returned to Grantsville. It was there that he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1880. He arrived in Copenhagen on 6 October 1880 and was assigned to labor in the Göteborg Conference. After serving an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 16 June 1882 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 250, 252, 265).

After returning to Utah, he entered into plural marriage with Augusta Anderson. His first wife did not approve of this marriage. She never lived with Swen again (see Carroll, “Westover Magazine Family History,” 2). Swen died in 1914 in Grantsville at age eighty-nine.