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Andrew Jensen Aagard

(Anders Jensen)

1844–1925

Residence: Fountain Green, Sanpete Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 2 May 1890

Missionary labors: Århus Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 7 August 1890

Birth date: 15 January 1844

Birthplace: Farre, Sporup, Skanderborg, Denmark

Father: Aagaard, Jens Pedersen

Mother: Andersdatter, Maren

Spouse: Jensdatter, Anne

Marriage date: 14 March 1865

Marriage place: Moroni, Sanpete Co., Utah

Spouse: Jensen, Christena Caroline Christensen

Marriage date: 23 March 1921

Marriage place: Moroni, Sanpete Co., Utah

Death date: 24 December 1925

Death place: Fountain Green, Sanpete Co., Utah

Burial place: Fountain Green, Sanpete Co., Utah

At age fourteen, Andrew was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Soon after his baptism, he journeyed with his family aboard the Prussian steamer Pauline to England. From Liverpool, England, to America, his family crossed the Atlantic Ocean aboard the William Tapscott (see “Andrew Jensen Aagard,” 1).

In 1860, they arrived in Utah and settled in Moroni, Sanpete County. In this town, Andrew learned English by attending night school for one season (see Yorgason, “Life of Andrew Jensen Aagard,” 1).

His biographer noted that in 1862, as President Brigham Young was driving his wagon from Moroni to Fountain Green, Sanpete County, he attempted to pass Andrew on the road. Andrew refused to let the elderly prophet pass him without a challenge. He “whipped up his oxen, running the President a race for some distance to the great amusement of the head of the Church” (Yorgason, “Life of Andrew Jensen Aagard,” 1).

In 1863, Andrew moved to Fountain Green, Sanpete County, Utah, and began farming without any capital. His farming episode was interrupted in 1866 due to the Native American wars; Andrew served as a cavalry soldier (see Yorgason, “Life of Andrew Jensen Aagard,” 2).

He did not enjoy prosperity until the 1880s. During this decade he operated a two-hundred-acre ranch, had twelve thousand sheep and some cattle, and served as president and superintendent of the local co-op store. He was also director of the Union Wool and Live Stock Commission Company (see History of Sanpete and Emery Counties, Utah, 208).

At age forty-six, he willingly set aside his many economic and civic duties to accept a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 2 May 1890 and was assigned to labor in the Århus Conference. While laboring in that conference, he discovered that the damp climate aggravated his eczema. This problem grew until it became necessary to release him from the mission. He departed from Copenhagen on 7 August 1890 bound for America (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 315–17).

Except for his bout with eczema, Andrew was a strong and healthy man. One descendant remembers him as a “Viking—six feet six inches tall, about 260 pounds. . . . He could lift a 400 pound bag of wool off the ground and shoulder it or load it on a hay rack. He had curly red hair and a beard. He had a wonderful Danish sense of humor” (correspondence from James Andrew Aagard, 24 July 1999). Andrew died on Christmas Eve in 1925 after eating a hearty meal and discussing his business ventures with his wife and near neighbors. He was eighty-one years old (see Yorgason, “Life of Andrew Jensen Aagard,” 4).


Torkel Evan Torkelsen Aarrestad

(Torkild Evensen) (Torkild Evensen Aarrestad)

1852–1931

Residence: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 11 March 1893

Missionary labors: Christiania Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 20 September 1894

Name of departure ship: Thorsa

Birth date: 25 September 1852

Birthplace: Skrelling, Varhang (Hå), Rogaland, Norway

Father: Torkildsen, Even

Mother: Svendsdatter, Inger

Spouse: Jacobsen, Eva Constansa

Marriage date: January 1883

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Peterson, Hildegard Caroline

Marriage date: 17 February 1890

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 10 March 1931

Death place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Burial place: Salt Lake City Cemetery, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Torkel was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on 5 April 1880 in Stavanger, Norway, by Peter Andersen. He was listed as “Torkel Aarestad” when he emigrated, crossing the ocean on the ship Nevada in June 1882. By 19 July 1882, he was in the Salt Lake Valley. He lived in the Salt Lake Nineteenth Ward, as well as in the Sugarhouse Ward for a short time.

While living in Salt Lake City, he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 11 March 1893 and was assigned to labor in the Christiania Conference. After completing an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 20 September 1894 aboard the steamer Thorsa (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavia Mission, 333, 335, 337).

In the 1900 U.S. Census, Torkel is listed as a carpenter. He died at the home of his daughter at 3500 East 700 South in Salt Lake City (see “Torkel E. Aarestad,” Deseret News, 10 March 1931).


Nils Benson Adler

(Nils Bengtsson)

1828–1921

Residence: Spring City, Sanpete Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 30 September 1879

Missionary labors: Skåne Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 29 August 1881

Name of departure ship: Pacific

Birth date: 30 December 1828

Birthplace: St. Petri-Malmö, Malmöhus, Sweden

Father: Nilsson (Malmgren), Bengt

Mother: Svensdotter, Cissela

Spouse: Nilsson (Håkansson), Else (Elsie), Mary

Marriage date: 21 October 1858

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Eklund, Bendikta

Marriage date: 19 April 1899

Marriage place: Manti, Sanpete Co., Utah

Death date: 3 December 1921

Death place: Castle Dale, Emery Co., Utah

Nils was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on 12 June 1857 in Malmö, Sweden. He served as president of the Skåne Conference from 1856 to 1858. He immigrated to America and had settled in Spring City, Sanpete County, Utah, by 1866 (see News Advocate, 8 December 1921).

Nils accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1879. He arrived in Copenhagen on 30 September 1879 and was assigned to labor in the Skåne Conference. After completing an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 29 August 1881 aboard the steamer Pacific (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 125, 238–39, 257–58, 483).

He returned to Spring City, where he resided for many years. On 1 September 1898, his wife Else died. She had been the proprietor of the Aldler House, which provided meals and lodging for travelers. He married Bendikta Eklund in 1899. In 1909, Nils moved to the Sterling Ward in the Taylor Stake. He was ill for many months before his death in December 1921 in Castle Dale, Emery County, at age ninety-three (see News Advocate, 8 December 1921).

Andrew Amundsen

(Andreas Olsen or Amundsen)

1849–1927

Residence: South Jordan, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 6 November 1880

Missionary labors: Christiania Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 20 June 1881

Name of departure ship: Cato

Birth date: 17 March 1849

Birthplace: Enerhaugen, Gamle Aker-Christiania, Christiania, Norway

Father: Amundsen, Ole

Mother: Jensdatter, Marie

Spouse: Glover, Mary Jane

Marriage date: 30 November 1874

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Glover, Elizabeth Anna

Marriage date: 14 November 1878

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 11 March 1927

Death place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Burial place: South Jordan, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Andrew’s first mission to his native land began on 6 November 1880. After only four months in Norway, he received word that his son was dead and other family members were sick. As he recalls in his autobiography, “I heard of nothing but deaths all the while I was away.” His sister’s daughter also died. The combined sorrow weighed heavily on him. His letter to the mission president explaining his hardships resulted in his honorable release from the mission. He departed on 20 June 1881 from Copenhagen, with the assurance from his mission president that he would later serve a complete mission (see “Andrew Amundsen’s Diary,” 57).

Upon returning to Utah, Andrew learned that his mother had died, that employers had refused to pay for his past labors, and that his two hundred sheep had died from the neglect of a hired shepherd. After such a series of losses, he asked an acquaintance why he had such bad luck. The acquaintance assured him that this was the Lord’s way of keeping him humble. He accepted this answer and added, “I do acknowledge the Lord’s hand in all things” (“Andrew Amundsen’s Diary,” 58).

Andrew regretted leaving the mission field early. His regrets escalated when several men in his ward made disparaging remarks toward him. He wrote a letter to President John Taylor asking for a personal interview. In the interview, President Taylor told Andrew that he wanted him to “fill that Mission and then another and then again another” (“Andrew Amundsen’s Diary,” 59).

Inspired by the prophetic answer, he prepared himself to serve another mission. He was set apart for his second mission on 9 October 1882. On 6 November 1882, exactly two years after his first arrival in Copenhagen, he returned to Scandinavia to labor in the Christiania Conference (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 250, 252, 255, 268–69, 273, 278, 427, 437, 507).

On this mission, Andrew suffered from religious persecution at the hands of local inhabitants and government officials. In 1883, he was arrested for preaching and was told that he must pay a fine and a fee to cover court costs. Andrew explained that he was traveling “without purse or scrip” (D&C 84:78) and could not pay the fine. He was then sentenced to prison. In prison, he drew pictures of Church leaders, studied the scriptures, and wrote letters and detailed journal entries. During his confinement, he refused most of the food and subsisted on bread and water: “I eat [sic] 7 slices . . . during 5 days I was in there.” He left the prison weak in body but high in spirit, writing, “I went out singing” (Journal of Andrew Amundsen, 2 February 1883, 5 March 1883). He departed from Copenhagen on 4 April 1884 after completing an eighteen-month mission (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 250, 252, 255, 268–69, 273, 278, 427, 437, 507).

Andrew returned to Scandinavia in 1909 and again in 1913 as a missionary. From 1914 to 1915, he was president of the Christiania Conference (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 250, 252, 255, 268–69, 273, 278, 427, 437, 507). He died in 1927 in Salt Lake City at age seventy-eight.


Carl Christian Amussen

(Carl Christian Carlsen)

1825–1902

Residence: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 23 May 1879

Missionary labors: Copenhagen Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 28 August 1880

Name of departure ship: Otto

Birth date: 20 May 1825

Birthplace: Kjøge, Køge, Copenhagen, Denmark

Father: Asmussen, Carl Crelles (Paulus)

Mother: Johansdatter, Petra Elizabeth Henrietta

Spouse: Nielsen, Anna Katrine

Marriage date: 2 August 1869

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Smith, Martha M.

Marriage date: 6 November 1884

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Smith, Barbara M.

Marriage date: 4 October 1885

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 29 October 1902

Death place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Burial place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

In his youth, Carl traveled widely and earned a living as a jeweler in Australia and New Zealand. He joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in England. He returned to Denmark in 1865, before immigrating to America. He crossed the plains with the Captain Thomas Taylor pioneering company to reach the Salt Lake Valley (see Flake, Portrait, Genealogical and Biographical Record of Utah, 233).

He was in Utah only one year before being called as a missionary to New Zealand. He labored for only three months in New Zealand before taking leave and journeying to Denmark. He resided in Denmark for a year and served as president of a local Latter-day Saint branch in the Copenhagen Conference (see Flake, Portrait, Genealogical and Biographical Record of Utah, 234).

After his return to Salt Lake City, Carl started a jewelry business. For twenty-three years, he was one of the leading jewelers in the state of Utah. He was also a stockholder in the Electric Light Company and had interest in all the banking houses in Salt Lake City. He owned stock in the Zion Cooperative Mercantile Institution and in the Provo Woolen Mills (see Flake, Portrait, Genealogical and Biographical Record of Utah, 234).

He left behind his wealth in 1879 to accept a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 23 May 1879 and was assigned to preside over the Copenhagen Conference. After serving an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 28 August 1880 aboard the steamer Otto (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 238, 244).

In 1886, to Americanize his surname, Carl formally changed his last name to Amussen. He retired from an active business life in 1890 and moved to Logan, Cache County, Utah. His biographer characterized Carl as “a most genial gentleman, an affable host, a loyal friend, [who] enjoys the confidence and esteem of a large circle of friends” (Flake, Portrait, Genealogical and Biographical Record of Utah, 234).

Carl also apparently had a hearty constitution; he had the habit of taking a cold bath early in the morning. His biographer wrote, “The colder the water, the better. When the water is frozen, he uses snow” (Flake, Portrait, Genealogical and Biographical Record of Utah). He died in 1902 in Logan at age seventy-seven.

Andrew Andersen

(Anders Andersen)

1835–1918

Residence: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 4 May 1883

Missionary labors: Copenhagen Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 7 May 1885

Birth date: 4 November 1835

Birthplace: Nyprøve, Everdrup, Præstø, Denmark

Father: Larsen, Anders

Mother: Andersdatter, Maren

Spouse: Olsen, Kersten

Marriage date: 21 December 1859

Marriage place: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

Spouse: Sorensen, Martha

Marriage date: 27 November 1889

Marriage place: Manti, Sanpete Co., Utah

Spouse: Jensen, Maren Catrine

Marriage date: 5 June 1889

Marriage place: Manti, Sanpete Co., Utah

Death date: 11 December 1918

Death place: Fairview, Sanpete Co., Utah

Burial place: Park Cemetery, Fairview, Sanpete Co., Utah

Andrew was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on 25 July 1853; the baptism was performed by Hans Pedersen. He immigrated to the United States in 1856. He then journeyed across the plains with an ox team company. On the journey, he suffered from cold and hunger and was brought to the Salt Lake Valley by a relief company (see History of Sanpete and Emery Counties, Utah, 294).

In 1857, he settled in Ephraim, Sanpete County, Utah. In that community, he purchased fifty acres of farmland. In 1862, he crossed the plains to help others reach the Salt Lake Valley. Then, in 1865, he moved to Circle Valley to help settle that area. Although he built a home in Circle Valley, trouble with Native Americans forced him to leave. He attempted to protect his holdings by serving as a minute man in the Black Hawk War, but he was unsuccessful. He was a member of Captain Lewis Larsen’s cavalry troop (see History of Sanpete and Emery Counties, Utah, 294).

In 1883, Andrew accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 4 May 1883 and was assigned to labor in the Copenhagen Conference. After completing an honorable mission, he departed from Denmark on 7 May 1885 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 273, 275, 292).

Returning to Utah, Andrew accepted a call to be one of the presidents of the Forty-seventh Quorum of the Seventy (see History of Sanpete and Emery Counties, Utah, 294–95). In 1918, he died due to general debility, although he had been suffering with a fractured hip, sustained in a fall in his room on 22 November. He was an active Church worker and is one of the old minutemen who served during the Native American troubles in Sanpete County and Circle Valley. He was the father of eight children, three of whom survive him (see “Pioneer Is Laid at Rest,” The Enterprise, 21 December 1918).


Andrew L. Andersen

(Anders Laustsen)

1850–1912

Residence: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 5 November 1881

Missionary labors: Århus Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 24 August 1883

Name of departure ship: Bravo

Birth date: 22 January 1850

Birthplace: Sejstrup, Højslev, Viborg, Denmark

Father: Andersen, Laust (Lars)

Mother: Pedersdatter, Maren

Spouse: Jensen, Johanna Christina

Marriage date: 31 October 1870

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 24 July 1912

Death place: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

Burial place: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

After Anders and his family joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, they emigrated from Denmark to America. They crossed the plains with the Canute Peterson pioneering company to reach the Salt Lake Valley (see History of Sanpete and Emery Counties, Utah, 295).

By October 1856, they had settled in Ephraim, Sanpete County, Utah. They resided in a fort for several years before building a home in the community. As Andrew reached manhood, his father gave him ten acres of farmland. On the land, he grew produce that he sold to the men in mining camps. Through this successful enterprise, he was able to purchase an additional thirty-five acres (see History of Sanpete and Emery Counties, Utah, 295).

In 1881, Andrew accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 5 November 1881 and was assigned to labor in the Århus Conference (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 262, 264). During this mission, he served for eighteen months as president of the Randers Branch (see History of Sanpete and Emery Counties, Utah, 295). One incident on the mission was noted by his descendant: “At that time some local youths were in the habit of setting their vicious dogs on the Mormon missionaries. When they set their dogs on Elder Andersen and Elder Hansen, Elder Andersen threw Elder Hansen on the ground, lay on top of him, and threw his coat over them. The dogs jumped over the Elders and ignored them” (correspondence from Margery Andersen, 16 July 1999).

Andrew departed from Denmark on 24 August 1883 aboard the vessel Bravo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 270). He returned to his family in Ephraim, where he died in 1912 at age sixty-two.

Andrew Rasmus Andersen

(Anders Jensen)

1844–1919

Residence: Lehi, Utah Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 22 November 1874

Missionary labors: Århus Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 22 June 1876

Name of departure ship: Otto

Birth date: 9 March 1844

Birthplace: Veddum, Skelum, Ålborg, Denmark

Father: Andersen, Jens

Mother: Rasmusdatter, Ane Katrine

Spouse: Pedersen, Mary Ann (Mariane)

Marriage date: 1 January 1863

Marriage place: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

Spouse: Nielsen (Jespersen), Mariane

Marriage date: 1 August 1868

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Andersen, Nielsina Maria

Marriage date: 10 April 1871

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 10 July 1919

Death place: Lehi, Utah Co., Utah

On 13 March 1861, Andrew, an only child, joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Denmark. His wealthy father paid for sixty or seventy Latter-day Saints to voyage to America. His father saved only enough money to take Andrew and his mother to America in 1862. Unfortunately, his father died while crossing the North Sea (see “Life Sketch of Andrew Rasmus Anderson,” 8–9).

Andrew and his mother arrived in the New York Harbor on 29 May 1862. They journeyed with the C. A. Madsen wagon train to Utah. After arriving in the Salt Lake Valley, they settled in Ephraim, Sanpete County. In that community, Andrew fought in the Black Hawk


War from 1865 to 1867. One year later, he became a United States citizen on 21 November 1868 (see “Life Sketch of Andrew Rasmus Anderson,” 13, 16).

By 1870, Andrew was the town marshal in Lehi, Utah County. In Lehi, he had much success growing sugar beets, potatoes, and corn on his farm, which bordered Utah Lake (see “Life Sketch of Andrew Rasmus Anderson,” 21).

In 1874, Andrew attended general conference in Salt Lake City. At the conference, he heard his name read aloud: he was being extended a mission call to Denmark. He readily accepted the call and arrived in Copenhagen on 22 November 1874. There he was assigned to be a traveling elder in the North Jutland Conference and later president of the Århus Conference. During his tenure as president, he raised money to build the Århus chapel. He donated one hundred kroner toward the chapel construction. On 22 June 1876, Andrew boarded the sailing vessel Otto and departed from Denmark with 405 emigrating Latter-day Saints and several other missionaries (see “Life Sketch of Andrew Rasmus Anderson,” 26–27).

Returning to Utah, he continued to serve and lead. In 1879, he was elected mayor of Lehi, a community of 2,026. He also served on the board of directors for the Lehi bank and as the director of the People’s Co-operative Institution (see “Life Sketch of Andrew Rasmus Anderson,” 21–22).

Ecclesiastically, he was a counselor in various bishoprics for over twenty-six years. For over seven years, he was in the presidency of the high priesthood. During these years, he followed the law of plural marriage. In 1888, Andrew was arrested for unlawful cohabitation and sentenced to three months in prison and a three-hundred-dollar fine (see “Life Sketch of Andrew Rasmus Anderson,” 37).

After completing his prison term, he returned to Lehi. In his later years, he was a member of the Alpine Stake high council from 1904 to 1911. Andrew died from surgical complications and bronchial pneumonia in 1919 at Lehi at age seventy-five (see “Life Sketch of Andrew Rasmus Anderson,” 38).


C. Emil Andersen

(Niels Peder Andersen)

1838–1906

Residence: American Fork, Utah Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 21 August 1882

Missionary labors: Copenhagen Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 25 August 1884

Name of departure ship: Panther

Birth date: 1 August 1838

Birthplace: Alehuset, St. Peders-Slagelse, Sorø, Denmark

Father: Nielsen, Anders

Mother: Andersdatter, Ane Marie

Spouse: Jensen, Ella Kirstina

Marriage date: about 1864

Marriage place: Slagelse, Sorø, Denmark

Spouse: Petersen (Carlile), Karen (Carolina) Sophia

Marriage date: 14 March 1868

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 28 September 1906

Death place: American Fork, Utah Co., Utah

Burial place: American Fork City Cemetery, American Fork, Utah Co., Utah

Emil was christened in the St. Peder’s Church as Niels Peder Andersen. When he joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on 15 October 1862, his family disowned him. As a result, he worked for two years to earn money to immigrate to America to be with other Latter-day Saints. It was not until he arrived in the United States that he changed his name to C. Emil Andersen (see interview with Zelda Anderson, wife of Warren Anderson).

In 1866, Emil, once a skilled cabinetmaker in Denmark, began making caskets in American Fork, Utah County. He entered the undertaking business as well. Finding himself successful, he journeyed to St. Louis to learn embalming. When he returned, he opened an undertaking parlor (see “Burying the Dead,” The Community Expands, 21).

He left this business to accept a mission call to Scandinavia in 1882. He arrived in Copenhagen on 21 August 1882 and was assigned to labor in the Copenhagen Conference. After serving faithfully for two years, he departed from Copenhagen on 25 August 1884 aboard the steamer Panther (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 267–68, 279).

Returning to American Fork, he accepted a position on the local high council. According to the 1900 Utah Federal Census, he was residing in American Fork with his sons Stephen, age fourteen, and Warren, age nine. When he died in 1906 at the age of sixty-seven, his sons Stephen and Warren took over his mortuary business (see “Burying the Dead,” The Community Expands; Shelley, Early History of American Fork, 9; “Emil Anderson is Dead,” Deseret News, 2 October 1906; “Anderson Had Casket Ready,” Salt Lake Tribune, 30 September 1906).


Hans Andersen

1819–1901

Residence: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 12 September 1882

Missionary labors: Aarhus Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 24 August 1883

Name of departure ship: Bravo

Birth date: 22 December 1819

Birthplace: Bredstrup, Nørre Nærå, Odense, Denmark

Father: Nielsen, Anders

Mother: Knudsdatter, Mette

Spouse: Jensdatter, Maren

Marriage date: 17 October 1845

Marriage place: Nørre Nærå, Odense, Denmark

Spouse: Ek (Bensdatter), Maria Charlotte

Marriage date: 16 July 1881

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 5 November 1901

Death place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Burial place: Logan Cemetery, Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Hans was the farmer of about seventy “tinner” of land in Bredstrup. A tinner was just a little less than an acre. The principal crops were rye and barley, but he also had cows, horses, sheep, and a flock of geese. In 1845, he married Maren, the daughter of a neighbor who owned a flour mill (see Merritt, History of Denmark and the Hans Anderson Family, 1).

The Mormon elders visited the family and were welcomed with room and board. Although the family was not converted, many visiting “Mormons” were welcomed at their home. On one occasion, his oldest son was kicked in the head by a horse. Because the boy’s skull was crushed so badly, the doctors said that he could not live. Hans went to the woods nearby and prayed and asked the Lord that if He would heal his son, and give Hans the wisdom to know the truth and the courage to accept it that he would join the Church and give of his time and property to build the kingdom. When Hans returned to the house and after the elders had administered to his son, he recovered quickly. On 13 March 1861, Hans, Maren, and their oldest son were baptized by H. K. Brown (see Merritt, “History of Denmark and the Hans Anderson Family,” 4–5).

Hans, Maren, and thirteen others from their household left Copenhagen and landed in America on 1 June 1863 after five weeks of sailing from Liverpool. They arrived in the Salt Lake Valley on 12 September 1863. He decided to take his family north to Cache Valley. He bought land north of Logan in the Petersboro area and is credited for building the first sawmill in Logan Canyon.

Three years following the birth of their tenth child, Maren died. The following period was extremely difficult for Hans and his children. Two years following, he met and married Maria C. Ek, a native of Sweden.

Hans received a mission call to return to Denmark in August of 1882. He arrived in Copenhagen on 12 September 1882. There he was assigned to labor in the Århus Conference. He completed his mission on 24 August 1883 and boarded the steamer Bravo to begin his journey to the states (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 267–68, 270).

Upon his return to Logan, Hans served the Church as a member of the high council in the Cache Stake and was later ordained a patriarch by Wilford Woodruff. He was always a friend to the poor and needy (see Merritt, “History of Denmark and the Hans Anderson Family,” 13). He died in 1901 at the age of eighty-one.


James Andersen

(Jens Andersen)

1835–1906

Residence: Spanish Fork, Utah Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 9 December 1887

Missionary labors: Copenhagen Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 8 August 1889

Name of departure ship: Bravo

Birth date: 28 April 1835

Birthplace: Tiendevad, Bromme, Sorø, Denmark

Father: Frederiksen, Anders

Mother: Jensdatter, Ellen

Spouse: Neilsen, Caroline Johanne Kirstine Sophie

Marriage date: 20 October 1862

Marriage place: Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark

Spouse: Becker, Hannah Marie

Marriage date: 6 April 1863

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Hansen, Mary Catherine

Marriage date: 23 March 1874

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Hansen, Jensina

Marriage date: 5 December 1877

Marriage place: St. George Temple, St. George, Washington Co., Utah

Death date: 16 September 1906

Death place: Springville, Utah Co., Utah

The fact that James’s mother died four months after his birth and the fact that he was reared by his older sisters did not hamper his emotional or physical well-being. As a young man, he owned a successful blacksmith shop and employed seven men. He was recognized as a member of the upper strata of society when he learned about The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He is said to have publicly ridiculed the new religion (see “James Andersen and Caroline Nielsen,” 215–16).

Then he met Caroline Nielsen, who had been a member of the Mormon faith since childhood. “She looked so pure and different than the other girls who attended the dances,” he said. When he learned that she was a Mormon, he told her that she had made a mistake. However, he borrowed a copy of the Book of Mormon and within a week had changed his mind and had given up using tobacco and alcohol. He was baptized on 4 July 1862 at age twenty-seven (see “James Andersen and Caroline Nielsen,” 116–17). Following his baptism, he served a local mission in Copenhagen (see correspondence from Laurie H. Steimle, 10 June 1999).

In 1863, James and his bride, Caroline, left Denmark and began their journey to Utah. They crossed the plains in John R. Murdock’s pioneer company. On the journey, James and Caroline walked most of the distance, arriving on 29 August 1863 in the Salt Lake Valley (see “James Andersen and Caroline Nielsen,” 118).

They settled first in Santaquin, Utah County, and then in Spanish Fork, Utah County. During their first winter, they lived in a dugout that was so cold that their blankets froze. They lived on carrots, bran bread, and a few fish caught in Utah Lake. That spring James walked without shoes to Salt Lake City seeking employment as a blacksmith. Failing to secure work, he returned to Spanish Fork with the resolve to open his own shop. He not only opened a shop but eventually owned 160 acres in Springville, Utah County, as well as property in Mapleton and Spanish Fork (see “James Andersen and Caroline Nielsen,” 118–19).

Prosperity did not hamper his religious inclinations. He is remembered for restoring, through his priesthood authority, the health of a son and daughter who had been run over by a wagon. One of his children penned, “He was a good father whose children loved and respected him” (“James Andersen and Caroline Nielsen,” 119–21).

In 1887, James left his family to serve a mission in Scandinavia. On the journey, he narrowly escaped arrest by pretending to smoke a cigar. Apparently, the authorities thought a Mormon would not be smoking (see “James Andersen and Caroline Nielsen,” 121). He arrived in Copenhagen on 9 December 1887 and was assigned to labor in the Copenhagen Conference. After serving an honorable mission, he was released to return to the states. He departed from Copenhagen on 8 August 1889 aboard the steamer Bravo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 304, 309).

After returning to Utah, James was imprisoned twice for practicing polygamy. In 1889, he was sentenced to seventy-five days in prison and a fifty-dollar fine. In 1892, he was sentenced to two months in prison (see “James Andersen and Caroline Nielsen,” 122).

James fulfilled many important positions in the Church. For many years, he acted as an advisor and interpreter for Danish immigrants who settled in Spanish Fork. He was ordained a high priest and set apart as a counselor to the president of the high priests quorum on 3 September 1876. He served as a counselor in a bishopric in Spanish Fork for a number of years and as a counselor in the Nebo Stake presidency. He also presided over Scandinavian meetings and conferences for many years (see “James Andersen and Caroline Nielsen,” 122).

On his deathbed, James asked if all his business had been taken care of and if all of his debts were paid. Satisfied with the answer, he died in 1906 in Springville, Utah County, at age seventy-one (see “James Andersen and Caroline Nielsen,” 122).


James Andersen

(Jens Hansen)

1854–1940

Residence: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 20 June 1892

Missionary labors: Copenhagen and Århus conferences

Departure date from Copenhagen: 19 July 1894

Name of departure ship: Rona

Birth date: 9 February 1854

Birthplace: Bredstrup, Nørre Nærå, Odense, Denmark

Father: Andersen, Hans

Mother: Jensdatter, Maren

Spouse: Hanson (Olofson), Emily Helena

Marriage date: 11 October 1878

Marriage place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Death date: 1 October 1940

Death place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Burial place: Lot 29, Block 5, Plat B, 8, Logan City Cemetery, Logan, Cache Co., Utah

The parents of James were well-to-do farmers, owning seventy acres in Bredstrup, Denmark. In 1861, Mormon elders baptized and confirmed his parents and other family members. His parents sold their land and immigrated with James to America, paying the passage of family members and hired help with the proceeds from their sale. They crossed the ocean on the John J. Boyd and arrived in the New York Harbor, where James’s father reported having ten thousand dollars in gold. They crossed the plains in the John R. Young company and arrived on 12 September 1863 in the Salt Lake Valley (see “Life of James Andersen,” 1).

The family settled in Logan, Cache County, where James grew to manhood. He courted Emily Helena and they married six year later (see “Life of James Andersen,” 2–3).

James worked for the United Order for those six years before transferring to the tithing office in Logan. His responsibilities at the office included pricing cattle for tithing and resale. He interrupted his employment to accept a mission call to Scandinavia in 1892 (see “Life of James Andersen,” 4).

He arrived in Copenhagen on 20 June 1892 and was assigned to labor in the Copenhagen Conference. He worked with a Brother Hansen, who, Andersen said, “took me all over the mission field almost walking me to death.” He served in Odense and met many of his father’s relatives in the city, but he was unable to change their ideas about religion. “I had the privilege of baptizing a few people, but as Mormonism was unpopular, it was hard for many to forget the flesh pots and good times they had as members of other religious bodies,” he wrote. After serving an honorable mission, James departed from Copenhagen on 19 July 1894 aboard the steamer Rona (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 328–29, 337). Aboard ship, the weather was so rough that he penned, “I wished I could die lots of times” (see “Life of James Andersen,” 5).

After returning to Logan, James married Emily. The first four years of their married life they lived with his parents (see “Life of James Andersen,” 4). James died in 1940 in Logan at age eighty-six.


Joseph Andersen

1862–1946

Residence: Fountain Green, Sanpete Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 3 November 1885

Missionary labors: Stockholm Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 18 August 1887

Name of departure ship: Bravo

Birth date: 7 September 1862

Birthplace: Moroni, Sanpete Co., Utah

Father: Anderson, Anders

Mother: Olsson, Anna Christina

Spouse: Taylor, Olive

Marriage date: 17 April 1890

Marriage place: Manti Temple, Manti, Sanpete Co., Utah

Death date: 8 October 1946

Death place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Burial place: Salt Lake City Cemetery, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Joseph was born in a small adobe home in Moroni, Sanpete County, Utah, to parents who had embraced the gospel in Sweden. His boyhood days were spent with his parents in Fountain Green, Sanpete County. He recalled Native American warfare and participating in spelling contests that occurred each week. He was always head of his class. He enjoyed music and singing, stating, “How bright and happy the world seemed and how greatly we enjoyed our associations.” At age nineteen, he finished his high school education in Manti, Sanpete County (see “Family History of Joseph Andersen,” 1).

Joseph obtained employment with the railroad in southern Colorado. He returned to Fountain Green with enough savings to buy a small brick house and city lot. He was working in the community as a clerk in a co-op store when a mission call came to serve in Scandinavia. Before leaving the community, parties were held and $62.90 was raised to help pay for his expenses on the mission (see “Family History of Joseph Andersen,” 4).

Arriving in Copenhagen on 3 November 1885, Joseph was assigned to labor in the Stockholm Conference. During the mission, he wrote daily accounts of his travels and labors. After completing an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 18 August 1887 aboard the steamer Bravo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 294–95).

After returning to Fountain Green, he wrote, “I felt considerably out of place for some weeks—could hardly adjust myself to home conditions.” He obtained employment as a teacher in the seventh and eighth grades before moving to Salt Lake City, where he worked as a grocery clerk. He advanced in the store, being elected secretary and treasurer. By 1893 he started his own business on West Temple Street selling butter and eggs. The business was known as the Andersen-Taylor Produce Company. It was the most successful wholesale grocery business in the state. At the close of 1904, his sales mounted to nearly two hundred and twenty-one thousand dollars (see “Family History of Joseph Andersen,” 9–12).

From 1917 to 1924, Joseph served on the high council of the Granite Stake. Following this service, he was second counselor to Bishop Joseph K. Daines. On 3 December 1930, he was elected to the board of education in Salt Lake City. In that same year, he opened a golf course and a duck-shooting range. Both of these enterprises were successful (see “Family History of Joseph Andersen,” 13–17).

In 1938, he was ordained a patriarch by Elder Joseph F. Richards. He died on 8 October 1946 following an operation for a fractured hip in Salt Lake City at age eighty-four. His funeral services were held at the McKinley Ward chapel (see “Family History of Joseph Andersen,” 20).


Lars Strib Andersen

(Lars Andersen)

1829–1901

Residence: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 30 May 1873

Missionary labors: Christiania Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 25 June 1875

Name of departure ship: Pacific

Birth date: 16 April 1829

Birthplace: Avlby, Vejlby, Odense, Denmark

Father: Larsen, Anders

Mother: Hansdatter, Ane Catrine

Spouse: Larsen, Ane (Annie) Sophie

Marriage date: 10 May 1852

Spouse: Petersen, Ane Margrethe

Marriage date: 27 April 1861

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Andersen (Lausten), Petrine

Marriage date: 29 October 1864

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Sorensen, Emma

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 7 September 1901

Death place: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

Burial place: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

After his father lost his life at sea in 1841, Lars and his four siblings were raised by their widowed mother. At age eighteen, Lars became a sailor. He commanded a small sailing vessel and was commissioned to transport officers of the Danish Army. He received an award for faithful service during the Danish War with Germany (see Feyen, “A Short Biography of the Life of Lars S. Andersen,” 1).

On 6 February 1852, Lars was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Following his baptism, he was appointed to preside over the Sletten Branch. In 1855, he and his family immigrated to America. They crossed the plains in the Canute Peterson Company to reach the Salt Lake Valley (see History of Sanpete and Emery Counties, Utah, 294).

In 1856, they settled in Ephraim, Sanpete County, Utah, where Lars fought in the Black Hawk War. After the war, he was ordained a high priest on 17 March 1867 (see History of Sanpete and Emery Counties, Utah, 295).

He accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1873. After arriving in Copenhagen on 30 May 1873, he was assigned to preside over the Christiania (Norway) Conference. He departed from Copenhagen on 25 June 1875 aboard the steamer Pacific (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 214–16, 221–22).

When he returned to Utah, Lars was selected to be a counselor to Bishop Canute Peterson. He served in that position until 4 July 1877, when he was called to be the bishop of the Ephraim North Ward. He interrupted this service to accept a second mission call to Scandinavia in 1887. He arrived in Copenhagen on 24 June 1887 and was assigned to preside over the Århus Conference. At the close of this honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 30 May 1889 aboard the steamer Milo in charge of the emigrating Latter-day Saints (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 52).

Lars returned to Utah and resumed his position as bishop of the Ephraim North Ward. He served his community as a city councilor for eight years and as the director of the co-op store for eight years (see History of Sanpete and Emery Counties, Utah, 294). He died in 1901 at age seventy-two (see correspondence from Alice Christensen; Feyen, “A Short Biography of the Life of Lars S. Andersen,” 2).


Martin Andersen

(Morten Andersen)

1848–1933

Residence: Richfield, Sevier Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 19 March 1892

Missionary labors: Århus Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 5 April 1894

Name of departure ship: Bravo

Birth date: 18 February 1848

Birthplace: Lundum, Skanderborg, Denmark

Father: Mortensen, Anders

Mother: Christiansdatter, Marie Kirstine

Spouse: Jensen, Andrea

Marriage date: 3 May 1894

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 8 January 1933

Death place: San Carlos, San Mateo Co., California

Burial place: Richfield City Cemetery, Richfield, Sevier Co., Utah

Martin was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter–day Saints in St. George, Washington County, Utah (see “Martin Andersen,” Deseret News, 10 January 1933). He was a resident of Richfield, Sevier County, Utah, when he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1892. He arrived in Copenhagen on 19 March 1892. After serving an honorable mission, he took passage aboard the steamer Bravo on 5 April 1894 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 328, 336).

He returned to Richfield and continued his faithful service to the Church. He moved from Richfield to Palo Alto, Santa Clara County, California, where he resided for fourteen years. Martin died in 1933 at San Carlos, San Mateo County, California, at age eighty-four. His funeral services were held in a chapel in Palo Alto. After the service, his body was taken to Richfield for interment (see “Martin Andersen,” Deseret News, 10 January 1933).


Niels J. Andersen

(Niels Thyregod Jeppesen)

1836–1905

Residence: Moroni, Sanpete Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 28 October 1890

Missionary labors: Copenhagen and Århus Conferences

Departure date from Copenhagen: 28 April 1892

Name of departure ship: Volo

Birth date: 10 February 1836

Birthplace: Rørbek Mark, Vester, Vejle, Denmark

Father: Andersen, Jeppe

Mother: Pedersdatter, Olea Sophia

Spouse: Nielsen, Karen Marie

Marriage date: 21 December 1861

Marriage place: Øster Nykirke, Vejle, Denmark

Death date: 28 August 1905

Death place: Moroni, Sanpete Co., Utah

Burial place: Moroni, Sanpete Co., Utah

Niels was christened Niels Thyregod Jeppesen, although in later records his name appeared as Niels Jepsen and Niels Anderson. Before 1864, he and his family joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. This fact is evidenced by a note written next to the recorded birth of his second child: “Child was not christened, parents are Mormon” (correspondence from Claudine J. Despain, 25 June 1999).

In 1872, Niels and his family immigrated to the United States aboard the Minnesota. After arriving in the Salt Lake Valley, they settled in Moroni, Sanpete County (see correspondence from Claudine J. Despain, 25 June 1999).

In 1890, Niels accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 28 October 1890 and was assigned to labor in the Copenhagen and Århus conferences. After serving faithfully for eighteen months, he boarded the steamer Volo in Copenhagen on 28 April 1892 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 316–17, 325). He returned to the states and resided in Moroni. Niels died in 1905 in Moroni at age sixty-nine.


Niels M. Andersen

(Niels Pedersen)

1850–83

Residence: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 25 September 1878

Missionary labors: Ålborg Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 5 July 1880

Name of departure ship: Leo (Cato)

Birth date: 8 April 1850

Birthplace: Kryl, Hune, Hjørring, Denmark

Father: Andersen, Peder Christian

Mother: Nielsdatter, Karen

Spouse: Christensen, Anne Sophia

Marriage date: 8 March 1866

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Cooper, Hannah

Marriage date: 9 December 1880

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 13 September 1883

Death place: Deseret Hospital, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Burial place: Redmond, Sevier Co., Utah

Niels, a resident of Ephraim, Sanpete County, Utah, accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1878. He arrived in Copenhagen on 25 September 1878 and was assigned to labor in the Ålborg Conference. On this mission, he served as an interpreter for Brother William Budge. He was also a choir leader but due to poor health, much of his missionary labors were spent in the mission office. It was while in the office that Brother Budge introduced him to Hannah Cooper, who would become his second wife. They didn’t begin courting until after his mission (see “History of Hannah Cooper Anderson Rasmussen Bryan,” 6).

It was his first wife, Sophia, who insisted that Niels practice plural marriage. Hannah wrote that initially Sophia “could not have been nicer had she been our mother.” But after their marriage, “she pushed me away—wouldn’t have him either” (“History of Hannah Cooper Anderson Rasmussen Bryan,” 11–14).

Hannah and Niels moved from Ephraim to Redmond, Sevier County, where Niels taught school. He died in the Deseret Hospital on a trip to Salt Lake City. He was suffering from diabetes at the


time and experienced sunstroke that aggravated his condition. He was age thirty-three (see “Died Away From Home,” Deseret News, 14 September 1883).


Peter Andersen

(Peder Laustsen)

1844–1919

Residence: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 1 December 1885

Missionary labors: Århus Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 18 August 1887

Name of departure ship: Bravo

Birth date: 16 November 1844

Birthplace: Højslevhuus, Højslev, Viborg, Denmark

Father: Andersen, Laust

Mother: Andersdatter, Maren

Spouse: Paulsen, Elsie Margrethe

Marriage date: 25 April 1865

Marriage place: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

Death date: 28 May 1919

Death place: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

Burial place: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

At age eleven, Peter was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on 2 November 1855. Within a year of his baptism, he immigrated with his parents to America and crossed the plains in the Canute Peterson ox team company. After arriving in the Salt Lake Valley, they settled in Ephraim, Sanpete County (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 54).

In 1863, Peter helped immigrants journey from the Missouri River to the valley of the Great Salt Lake. After returning to Ephraim, he fought in the Black Hawk War in Salina Canyon and Circle Valley (see History of Sanpete and Emery Counties, Utah, 298).

He was ordained an elder on 14 October 1865 by Joseph F. Smith. Then, a year before his mission call, Seymour B. Young ordained him a Seventy on 7 August 1884 (see Ephraim South Ward Records, FHL Film 0025935).

In 1885, Peter received a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 1 December 1885 and was assigned to labor in the Århus Conference. In that conference, he was well-received and enjoyed his mission among near neighbors and kinfolk (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 54). During the last three months of this mission, he served as president of the Rander’s Branch (see History of Sanpete and Emery Counties, Utah, 298). Peter departed from Copenhagen on 18 August 1887 aboard the vessel Bravo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 303).

Returning to Ephraim, he acquired seventy-five acres (see History of Sanpete and Emery Counties, Utah, 298). He died in 1919 in Ephraim at age seventy-four.

Adolph Bernhart Anderson

1860–1941

Residence: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 14 June 1887

Missionary labors: Stockholm Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 24 April 1890

Name of departure ship: Cameo

Birth date: 13 December 1860

Birthplace: Domkirken-Christiania, Christiania, Norway

Father: Andersen, Peter

Mother: Bredesdatter, Martha Ingeborg

Spouse: Farrow, Annie Mariah

Marriage date: 16 March 1898

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 1 October 1941

Death place: Birchcreek, Weber Co., Utah

Burial place: Ogden, Weber Co., Utah

Adolph Bernhart’s sister, Gunda Josephine, was baptized into the Cathedral Church (Domkirken) as an infant in Christiania, Norway, on 13 June 1859. Because Adolph’s parents joined the Church on 5 August 1860, some five months before he was born, no record of his infant baptism or birth could be found in the records.

In his infancy, Adolph was carried across the plains in his mother’s arms to the Salt Lake Valley. He and his parents resided in Salt Lake City for two years before homesteading in Morgan County, Utah. Adolph grew to manhood helping his father with farm work, irrigation, digging canals, and raising livestock (see Warrum, Utah Since Statehood, 500).

While living in Logan, Cache County, Adolph accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1887. He arrived in Copenhagen on 14 June 1887 and was assigned to labor in the Stockholm Conference as a translator and writer. After serving faithfully in this capacity for almost three years, he departed from Copenhagen on 24 April 1890 aboard the steamer Cameo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 304, 313–14).

In 1907, Adolph and his family were residing in Birch Creek, Weber County, Utah. In that farming community, Adolph raised dairy cattle and turkeys on 320 acres. He served his community as a school trustee and road supervisor. His biographer expressed confidence in his community service: “His aid and influence are always on the side of advancement and improvement, and his cooperation can at all times be counted upon to further the public welfare” (Warrum, Utah Since Statehood, 500). Adolph died in 1941 in Birch Creek at age eighty.


Albin Canfield Anderson

1864–1900

Residence: Moroni, Sanpete Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 7 November 1883

Missionary labors: Göteborg Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 15 October 1885

Name of departure ship: Bravo

Birth date: 10 September 1864

Birthplace: Little Platte River, Wyoming Co., Wyoming

Father: Anderson, Lars Jacob

Mother: Bengtson, Anna Britta

Spouse: Tippets, Rose Ellen

Marriage date: 20 February 1889

Marriage place: Manti, Sanpete Co., Utah

Death date: 30 June 1900

Death place: Spring City, Sanpete Co., Utah

Burial place: Block 16, Lot 6, Moroni City Cemetery, Moroni, Sanpete Co., Utah

Albin, a resident of Moroni, Sanpete County, Utah, accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1883. He arrived in Copenhagen on 7 November 1883 and was assigned to labor in the Göteborg Conference. At the completion of an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 15 October 1885 aboard the steamer Bravo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 274–75, 292).

Returning to Utah, he served in his quorum, the YMMIA, and the Sunday School. While felling timber in the mountains east of Spring City, Sanpete County, he was instantly killed when, without warning, a dead tree standing forty feet away fell and its top branches struck Albin in the head and chest. He was thirty-six at the time of his death. According to the Moroni City Sextant record, he was single. His funeral services were held at the local meetinghouse (see “Albin C. Anderson Killed by Falling Tree—Boy May Lose His Foot,” Deseret Evening News, 4 July 1900; correspondence from Dan Hall).


Andrew Anderson

(Anders Andersson)

1835–1925

Residence: Union, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 6 November 1882

Missionary labors: Skåne Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 25 August 1884

Name of departure ship: Panther

Birth date: 10 November 1835

Birthplace: Klagstorp, Östra Klagstorp, Malmöhus, Sweden

Father: Nilsson, Anders

Mother: Larsdotter, Ellna

Spouse: Jensen, Christina Maria

Marriage date: 26 June 1863

Marriage place: Winter Quarters, Douglas Co., Nebraska

Spouse: Larson, Carrie

Marriage date: about 1885

Death date: 13 May 1925

Death place: East Midvale, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Burial place: Murray Cemetery, Murray, Salt Lake Co., Utah

On 10 November 1859, Anders was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints by Jens Madsen. He was called to serve as a local missionary in Denmark. While on this mission, he met Christina Maria Jensen, who later became his wife. He and Christina departed from Denmark on 23 April 1863 with a company of Latter-day Saints. After they arrived in New York Harbor, they journeyed to Winter Quarters, Douglas County, Nebraska, where they were married. They then traveled west in John Young’s pioneering company (see correspondence from A. LaNae Snow).

He and Christina settled in Fort Union, Salt Lake County. There, Andrew farmed thirty-two acres valued at $1,105 (see correspondence from A. LaNae Snow).

In 1882, he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 6 November 1882 and was assigned to labor in the Skåne Conference. He wrote in his journal that the president of the mission told him that he was the “best preacher and that he expected more of me than from the others” (“Journal of Anders Anderson,” 18). After serving an honorable mission, Andrew boarded the steamer Panther on 25 August 1884 with thirty-one returning missionaries and five hundred emigrating Latter-day Saints (see Journal of Andrew Anderson, 37).

He served a second mission to Scandinavia from 1897 to 1898. He arrived in Copenhagen on 17 April 1897 and was assigned to preside over the Skåne Conference. On the journey home, he was in charge of a company of emigrating Latter-day Saints. They arrived in Salt Lake City on 10 June 1899 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 361, 364, 371).

After returning home, Andrew was ordained a high priest on 2 February 1901. He died in 1925 at his residence in Midvale, Salt Lake County, at age eighty-eight (see “Indian War Veteran Dies,” Midvale Journal, 15 May 1925; “Andrew Anderson” Deseret News, 15 May 1925).


Andrew Hugo Anderson

(Anders Andersson)

1830–1907

Residence: Huntsville, Weber Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 6 November 1882

Missionary labors: Göteborg Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 9 June 1884

Name of departure ship: Milo

Birth date: 6 August 1830

Birthplace: Fjällgime, Enslöv, Halland, Sweden

Father: Nilsson, Anders

Mother: Magnusdotter, Christina

Spouse: Larsen, Christina

Marriage date: 16 February 1856

Spouse: Pehrson, Elena

Marriage date: 24 August 1874

Spouse: Fagerstrom, Emma

Marriage date: 22 October 1886

Marriage place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Death date: 2 April 1907

Death place: Huntsville, Weber Co., Utah

Although details are not given, a biographer records that “when a youth [Andrew] was preserved from an untimely death by a miraculous manifestation of the power of God” (Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 2:341). He was baptized on 23 May 1857 a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints by C. E. Lindholm. Like many of his Latter-day Saint countrymen, he was subjected to “considerable persecution on account of his religion.” On 11 October 1857, he was ordained a teacher and assigned to preside over prayer meetings held in the Halmstad Branch (Halland County). On 15 November 1858, he was ordained an elder and was appointed to preside over the Falkenborg Branch (Halland County). By 1861, he was president of the Halmstad Branch again, and by 1865 he was assigned to be a traveling elder (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 268–69, 279).

Andrew immigrated to America aboard the vessel Humboldt. After arriving in New York Harbor on 19 July 1866, he ventured to the Midwest and crossed the plains in the Peter Nebeker ox team company, arriving on 29 September 1866 in the Salt Lake Valley (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 2:341).

Andrew settled in Huntsville, Weber County, Utah, where he was ordained a Seventy on 11 September 1869 by Joseph Young (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 2:341). In 1882, he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 6 November 1882 and was assigned to labor in the Göteborg Conference. He labored principally in the Norrköping (Östergotland County), Västervik (Kalmar County), Jonköping (Jonköping County), and Halmstad (Halland County) branches. After fulfilling an honorable mission, he boarded the sailing vessel Milo on 9 June 1884 to begin his journey to America (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 268, 279).

He was greeted by family and friends upon his return to Huntsville. For a number of years, he presided over the Scandinavian meetings in Huntsville (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 2:341). Andrew died in 1907 in Huntsville at age seventy-six.

Andrew John Anderson

(Anders Johan Andreasson)

1860–1943

Residence: Huntsville, Weber Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 13 November 1883

Missionary labors: Göteborg Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 20 August 1885

Name of departure ship: Cato

Birth date: 2 August 1860

Birthplace: Kärret, Kinne-Kleva, Skaraborg, Sweden

Father: Andreasson, Gustaf

Mother: Johansdotter, Maja Stina (Maria Christina)

Spouse: Yeaman, Cynthia Ann

Marriage date: 7 December 1882

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 3 February 1943

Death place: Ogden, Weber Co., Utah

Burial place: Ogden, Weber Co., Utah

Although Andrew’s mother accepted the gospel in 1866, his father was antagonistic toward Mormonism. However, when the missionaries spoke to his father about moving to Utah, he liked the idea enough to sell his home and homemade furniture so that he could emigrate with the Latter-day Saints (see correspondence from Karen E. Stark, 6 July 1999).

In May 1868, Andrew, with his brother and father, crossed the Atlantic on the steamship Oceanic. They then joined one of the last wagon trains heading to Utah. Andrew recalled walking by his father’s side from Omaha, Douglas County, Nebraska, to the Salt Lake Valley (see correspondence from Karen E. Stark, 6 July 1999).

They settled in Huntsville, Weber County, Utah, and waited for the remainder of the family to arrive in 1869. Andrew was baptized a week after his mother’s arrival on 15 August 1869 (see correspondence from Karen E. Stark, 6 July 1999). He grew to manhood in Huntsville. His most notable success in town was owning an interest in a cheese factory, which later sold for $17,500 (see Newey, Remember My Valley, 273). Most biographers believe that he sold his share in the factory to finance his mission to Scandinavia. However, descendants insist that Andrew’s father, who had been hostile toward the Church, paid for his mission (see correspondence from Karen E. Stark, 6 July 1999).

Andrew arrived in Copenhagen on 13 November 1883 and was assigned to labor in the Göteborg Conference. He completed an honorable mission and departed from Copenhagen on 20 August 1885 aboard the sailing vessel Cato (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 274–75, 291).

He returned to Huntsville, where he served in bishoprics for a number of years and as a Sunday School superintendent for twenty years. Descendants claim that he started the first parents’ class in the Church (see correspondence from Karen E. Stark, 6 July 1999).

Andrew also served his community on the city council in 1903. He was a member of the Huntsville Irrigation Association and was on a committee to establish a community library (see correspondence from Karen E. Stark, 6 July 1999).

According to his obituary, he served a mission in 1930 in California. Andrew died in 1943 following a two-week illness at his home in Huntsville at age eighty-two (see “Obituary Andrew J. Anderson,” Ogden Standard-Examiner, 3 February 1943).


Andrew Ole Anderson

(Anders Olasson)

1843–1929

Residence: Glenwood, Sevier Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 3 October 1880

Missionary labors: Skåne Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 13 October 1882

Name of departure ship: Cato

Birth date: 20 June 1843

Birthplace: Slimminge #14, Slimminge, Malmöhus, Sweden

Father: Anderson, Ola

Mother: Borkersdotter, Anna

Spouse: Stormfeldt, Johanna Henrietta

Marriage date: 4 July 1864

Marriage place: Monroe, Sevie Co.r, Utah

Spouse: Nielson, Elsie Jensen Froid

Marriage date: 22 May 1871

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Peterson, Amelia

Marriage date: 1 March 1878

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 11 February 1929

Death place: Glenwood, Sevier, Utah

Burial place: Glenwood Cemetery, Glenwood, Sevier Co., Utah

The family of Andrew “left comfort and plenty to come to America” in 1854. Although only twelve years old at the time, Andrew “walked the entire distance across the plains” (Pederson, “Andrew Ole Anderson,” 1).

At age fourteen, he became a Pony Express rider. As a rider, when he “saw trouble . . . he’d often ride one stirrup and get down on one side of the horse making it look as if it were a horse without a rider.” Being an experienced rider led to his employment as a guide for wagon trains journeying across the plains toward Utah (see Pederson, “Andrew Ole Anderson,” 1).

Andrew eventually settled in Monroe, Sanpete County, Utah. However, in 1867 he left Monroe because “conditions had become unbearable” and moved to Ephraim, Sanpete County. In Ephraim, Andrew joined the militia in hopes of protecting settlers from encroaching Native Americans. He was later appointed to be a marshal and a justice of the peace (see Pederson, “Andrew Ole Anderson,” 1).

In 1880, he moved to Glenwood, Sevier County, Utah, where he was employed to repair farm machinery (see Pederson, “Andrew Ole Anderson,” 1). In that same year, he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 3 October 1880 and was assigned to labor in the Skåne Conference. After completing an honorable mission, he departed from Denmark on 13 October 1882 aboard the steamer Cato (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 266–67, 269).

He returned to his family in Ephraim. Due to his polygamous relationships, Andrew was fined three hundred dollars and was sentenced to six months in prison on 7 March 1890 (see Jenson, LDS Church Chronology, 7 March 1890). He died on 11 February 1929 in Glenwood at age eighty-five.


Andrew Peter Anderson

(Anders Peter Andersson)

1857–1926

Residence: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 2 October 1889

Missionary labors: Stockholm Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 3 September 1891

Birth date: 12 April 1857

Birthplace: Sadfallet, Risinge, Östergötland, Sweden

Father: Jönsson (Johansson), Anders (Peter)

Mother: Samuelsdotter, Carolina

Spouse: Pettersson, Amanda Wilhelmina

Marriage date: 22 March 1883

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Schultz, Julia Augusta

Marriage date: 13 October 1888

Spouse: Anderson, Alma Erika

Marriage date: 9 March 1901

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Nelson, Hannah Elizabeth

Marriage date: 15 March 1906

Death date: 27 October 1926

Death place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Burial place: Salt Lake City Cemetery, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Andrew left school to seek employment at age ten. He was orphaned at age twelve. He worked in a woolen factory for nearly six years in Vistinge (Finspång), Östergötland Län, Sweden, to support himself. During that time, he heard the gospel message of the Latter-day Saint missionaries. He was baptized on 20 January 1878 in Stockholm by Carl A. Ek. He was baptized at age fourteen, and as a result, he was rejected by his loved ones (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 3:290–91).

In 1878, he accepted a local mission call to Stockholm and Uppsala. After being persecuted and forbidden to preach in these areas, he traveled to the Sundsvall Branch, which included all of Norrland (Västernorrland County). In 1880, he became president of the Örebro Branch (Örebro County). It was while fulfilling this assignment that government authorities arrested him and sentenced him to two weeks in prison with rations of bread and water. He avoided the prison term by leaving the area. On this mission, he baptized eighty-five converts (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 3:291).

In 1881, Andrew immigrated to America aboard the Wyoming. He settled in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah. From 1881 to 1882 he worked on the railroads, and in 1883 as a merchant, an occupation he followed for twenty-five years (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 3:291).

He interrupted his merchandising business to accept a mission call to Scandinavia. As he worked his way toward the east coast of the United States, he visited Church history sites in Missouri and Illinois. He arrived in Copenhagen on 2 October 1889 and was assigned to labor in the Stockholm Conference. He served as president of that conference. During his tenure, he paid off the debts of the conference and baptized sixty-six converts (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 3:291).

Returning to Utah, Andrew’s leadership was again recognized. He served as a policeman, a probation officer, a president of the Sixty-first Quorum of the Seventy, and as a counselor in the Scandinavian organization of the Granite Stake (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 3:291).

In April 1915, he returned to Sweden on another mission. He was asked to preside over the Sundsvall Conference, when the previous conference president was banished for preaching. In January 1916 he was called to preside over the Stockholm Conference, and by May of that year was president of the Swedish Mission. World War I raged in Europe during his presidency causing Andrew to pass “through many hardships and difficulties.” But despite these hardships, he baptized another ninety converts and reduced the debts of the mission by the faithful payment of tithes by the Swedish Saints. He was honorably released from this mission on 26 July 1919 (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 3:291–92). Andrew died in 1926 in Salt Lake City at age sixty-nine.


August Kull Anderson

(August Johannesson)

1843–1925

Residence: Grantsville, Tooele Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 18 November 1884

Missionary labors: Göteborg Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 12 August 1886

Name of departure ship: Bravo

Birth date: 20 April 1843

Birthplace: Lekesbacken, Erska, Älvsborg, Sweden

Father: Andersson, Johannes

Mother: Eliasdotter, Maria Stina (Majastina)

Spouse: Wahlgreen, Emily Sophia

Marriage date: 16 March 1869

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Jonsson (Johnson), Ellen Andrietta Albertina

Marriage date: 21 June 1883

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 3 April 1925

Death place: Grantsville, Tooele Co., Utah

Burial place: Grantsville City Cemetery, Grantsville, Tooele Co., Utah

August was ridiculed for attending Mormon meetings while serving in the Swedish military. Military leaders threatened to give him a dishonorable discharge if he continued affiliating with Mormons. His discharge was prevented by his commanding officer, who thought highly of him and issued an honorable release (see “Autobiography of August K. Anderson,” 1).

August was baptized on 1 April 1863. In 1864, he immigrated to America aboard the Monarch of the Sea. He crossed the plains with the William E. Preston ox team company to reach the Salt Lake Valley. For a brief time, he lived with the Heber C. Kimball family before moving to Grantsville, Tooele County (see “Autobiography of August K. Anderson,” 1).

In September 1865, August was ordained an elder by William Lee. In 1866 he was called as a teamster to cross the plains and help other emigrants reach the valley in safety. On his return to the valley, his company was attacked by Native Americans. He survived the ordeal (see “Autobiography of August K. Anderson,” 1).

In 1869, August was called to settle in the Bear Lake region. In that area, he hauled freight and laid rails for the railroad before returning to Grantsville in 1872. On 7 October 1884 he was ordained a Seventy (see “Autobiography of August K. Anderson,” 1).

In 1884, he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 18 November 1884 and was assigned to labor in the Göteborg Conference. He served as a traveling elder before being assigned to be president of the Göteborg Conference. He served in this calling until his departure on 12 August 1886 aboard the sailing vessel Bravo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 282–83, 298).

After his mission, August served in various Church callings including first counselor to the stake superintendent of the Sunday School and as a tithing clerk in the Grantsville Ward. He was also in the presidency of the Thirty-first Quorum of the Seventy and bishop of the Grantsville Ward from 1906 to 1914. He was ordained a patriarch by David O. McKay (see “Autobiography of August K. Anderson,” 1).

Civically, he was a member of the city council for eight years and a member of the school board for eleven years. He was also a supporter of local ball games. At his death, Native Americans came to his home to pay their respects because he had given them food when needed (see “Autobiography of August K. Anderson,” 1–2). He died in 1925 in Grantsville at age eighty-one.


Carl Gustaf Anderson

1838–1923

Residence: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 2 November 1884; 18 September 1891

Missionary labors: Göteborg Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 7 October 1886; 13 April 1893

Name of departure ship: Milo

Birth date: 7 June 1838

Birthplace: Sanstorpet, Furingstad, Östergötland, Sweden

Father: Carlsson, Anders

Mother: Jönsdotter, Anna

Spouse: Pettersson, Augusta Fredrika

Marriage date: 1871

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 20 February 1923

Death place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Burial place: Salt Lake Cemetery, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

On 1 July 1865, Carl was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Norrkoping, Sweden, by F. W. Bonniras. He was ordained an elder in September 1865 by William Lee. He served a local mission in the Linköping Branch (Östergotland County) before immigrating to America in 1870 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 282–83, 298).

After arriving in America, he became a United States citizen on 29 November 1870. He resided in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah. He lived in the Salt Lake Nineteenth Ward, where he was employed as a woodworker. In that ward, he was ordained a seventy on 9 June 1884 by W. W. Taylor (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 282–83, 298).

Soon after his ordination, he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. Upon arriving in Copenhagen on 2 November 1884, he was assigned to labor in the Göteborg Conference. After completing an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 7 October 1886 aboard the sailing vessel Milo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 282–83, 298).

Five years later, on 19 September 1891, he returned to Scandinavia as president of the Göteborg Conference. He served as president until 13 April 1893 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 319, 321, 324, 333).

Carl died in 1923 at a county hospital in Salt Lake City at age eighty-four. At the time of his death, he had no descendants and was a widower (see “Called by Death,” Deseret News, 23 February 1923).


Charles Erik Anderson

(Carl Eric Andersson)

1854–1926

Residence: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 12 September 1882

Missionary labors: Stockholm Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 9 June 1884

Name of departure ship: Milo

Birth date: 7 May 1854

Birthplace: Stora Näset, Södertälje, Stockholm, Sweden

Father: Petersson, Anders

Mother: Andersdotter, Maria Christina

Spouse: Mattson, Anna

Marriage date: 7 May 1886

Death date: 6 February 1926

Death place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Burial place: Salt Lake City Cemetery, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Charles immigrated to the United States in 1877. He was living in Logan, Cache County, Utah, when he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1882. He arrived in Copenhagen on 12 September 1882 and was assigned to labor in the Stockholm Conference. After serving an honorable mission, he boarded the steamer Milo on 9 June 1884 bound for the states (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 267–68, 279).

It appears that Anna had given birth to three illegitimate children before her marriage to Charles. After their marriage, the children used the name of Anderson. According to family tradition, the marriage ended when Charles wanted to be sealed in the temple to Anna but not to her three sons (see Logan Seventh Ward Records, 14). In about 1894, he moved to Altonah, Duchesne County. There he worked as a prospector and postmaster.

Charles served as branch and ward clerk in Altonah until he contracted cancer and suffered from ill health. He died on 6 February 1926 in a Salt Lake hospital. He was buried in the Salt Lake City Cemetery.


Charles Leroy Anderson

(Calle Andersson)

1846–1908

Residence: Grantsville, Tooele Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 20 November 1878

Missionary labors: Göteborg Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 5 July 1880

Name of departure ship: Leo (Cato)

Birth date: 11 April 1846

Birthplace: Viken, Ånimskog, Älvsborg, Sweden

Father: Andersson, Anders

Mother: Andersdotter, Kajsa

Spouse: Akerberg, Ellen Brita Paulsson

Marriage date: 16 April 1868

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 11 December 1908

Death place: Los Angeles, Los Angeles Co., California

Burial place: Grantsville, Tooele Co., Utah

In 1861, Charles was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Soon after his baptism, he emigrated from Sweden to America. He crossed the plains in the Captain Horne pioneer company and arrived on 8 October 1862 in the Salt Lake Valley (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:544).

Charles settled in Grantsville, Tooele County, Utah. Four years later, he journeyed to the Missouri River to help stranded Latter-day Saints reach the Salt Lake Valley (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:544).

In 1878, Charles accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 20 November 1878 and was assigned to be a traveling elder in the Göteborg Conference. From 1879 to 1880, he served as president of that conference. He concluded his mission on 5 July 1880 and returned to the states (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 235–36, 244).

After returning to Utah, Charles served on the Tooele Stake high council and then as first counselor in the Tooele Stake presidency for nineteen years. He was also a member of city council, mayor of Tooele, and a state legislator for two terms. Charles is credited with helping thirty-one Swedish emigrants acquire the necessary means to come to Utah (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:544). He died in 1908 in Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California, at age sixty-two.


Edward Henrick Anderson

(Henric Edward Nilsson)

1858–1928

Residence: Ogden, Weber Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 28 September 1890

Missionary labors: Scandinavian Mission

Departure date from Copenhagen: 22 September 1892

Birth date: 8 October 1858

Birthplace: Hedgården, Billeberga, Malmöhus, Sweden

Father: Andersson, Nils

Mother: Svensdotter, Botilla

Spouse: Ballantyne, Jane Susannah

Marriage date: 29 June 1882

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 1 February 1928

Death place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Burial place: Wasatch Lawn Cemetery, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

In 1864, Edward immigrated to America with Nils Andersson and Penilla Pehrsdotter aboard the Monarch of the Sea. He arrived in Salt Lake City on 15 September 1864 with the Captain William B. Preston pioneering company (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:715).

Edward resided in Mill Creek, Salt Lake County; Farmington, Davis County; and Huntsville, Weber County, Utah. In each locale, he alternately worked on farms and attended school. On 1 July 1869, he was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. In 1877 he graduated from the University of Deseret normal school and obtained employment as a schoolteacher in Weber County (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:715).

In 1879, he began a career in journalism. For a decade, he was the managing editor of a newspaper in Ogden. From 1888 to 1889, he edited and managed The Contributor, and for eight years he was the Weber County supervisor of public schools (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:715).

On 3 September 1890, Edward accepted a mission call to Sweden. He served as president of the Scandinavian Mission for two years. On the mission, he edited all Church papers in Swedish and Danish. He departed from Denmark on 22 September 1892 (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:715).

After returning to Utah, Edward continued to write and edit, including two books on Church history—A Brief History of the Church and A Life of Brigham Young. He also served in a number of important Church positions, including the general board of the YMMIA and the high council in the Weber Stake (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:715).

He was the associate editor of the Improvement Era for twenty-nine years (see Wells and Brimhall, “Edward H. Anderson,” Improvement Era, 31:363). Three times, he was elected city recorder of Ogden, and in 1900 he was elected to the state legislature. In 1901, he was appointed Surveyor-General of Utah, having been nominated by President William McKinley. He served in that position for five years (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:715).

A biographer said of him, “Elder Anderson is a hard student and diligent worker, and one of the brightest men in the Church.” Edward died in 1928 at Salt Lake City at age sixty-nine. President Heber J. Grant gave his funeral eulogy (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:715).


Erastus Anderson

1858–87

Residence: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 1 December 1885

Missionary labors: Århus Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 21 June 1886

Name of departure ship: Otto

Birth date: 17 December 1858

Birthplace: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

Father: Andersen, Lars Strib

Mother: Larsen, Ane Sophie

Spouse: Jensen, Josephine

Marriage date: 28 February 1878

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 24 October 1887

Death place: Spring City Canyon, Sanpete Co., Utah

Burial place: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

At age twenty-seven, Erastus received a mission call to Scandinavia. He accepted the call and arrived in Copenhagen on 1 December 1885. He was assigned to labor in the Århus Conference (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 294–95). Illness forced him to abandon the mission on 21 June 1886 (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 52). In Copenhagen, he boarded the steamer Otto bound for England. From British shores, he boarded another vessel to reach America (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 297).

After returning to Utah, Erastus served as president of the YMMIA in Ephraim, Sanpete County, until his death. At age twenty-nine, he was killed in an accident in Spring City Canyon in 1887. According to his biographer, Erastus was “a faithful Saint, a devoted husband and a kind father, highly respected and beloved by all who knew him” (Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 52).


Gustave Anderson

(Gustaf Andersson)

1821–1911

Residence: Hyrum, Cache Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 20 November 1878

Missionary labors: Christiania Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 30 August 1879

Name of departure ship: Albion

Birth date: 26 January 1821

Birthplace: Kroken, Holmedal, Värmland, Sweden

Father: Olsson, Anders

Mother: Ersdotter, Catherine

Spouse: Thornstensen (Torstensen), Maren

Marriage date: 27 December 1842

Marriage place: Nesodden, Akershus, Norway

Spouse: Esbjornsen, Anna

Marriage date: 22 March 1858

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Haraldsen, Maren

Marriage date: 28 September 1861

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Swensen, Caroline Wilhelmina

Marriage date: 19 September 1868

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Nielsen, Berthe Maria

Marriage date: 1 November 1875

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 6 October 1911

Death place: Hyrum, Cache Co., Utah

Burial place: Hyrum, Cache Co., Utah

Gustav’s parents were so poor that they made bread by grinding grain along with bones and tree bark. At age sixteen, Gustave left his parents’ home to seek work in Norway. He recalled that one employer beat him with a strap and paid him only two dollars a year plus a pair of shoes. However, as time passed, Gustave improved his employment situation by becoming a foreman for the city engineers in Oslo. This employ brought prosperity to him until he was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on 11 July 1854 by C. Field. He lost his employment because he had joined with the Mormons (see “Gustave Anderson,” 1).

Despite this loss, Gustave and his family were happy. They opened their home to Mormon missionaries, who called his wife “Mother.” Gustave was ordained a priest on 30 December 1854 and an elder on 8 August 1856. Four years after his baptism, he sold his home and kept only twenty dollars, giving the remainder to the missionaries (see “Gustave Anderson: His Life and Families,” 12). He and his family left their homeland and journeyed to America aboard the Westmoreland. They joined a handcart company in 1857 bound for the Salt Lake Valley (see “Gustave Anderson: His Life and Families,” 2).

After their arrival in the Salt Lake Valley, Gustave received many Church assignments. These assignments included working on the Salt Lake Temple and greeting countrymen as they arrived at the Eighth Ward Square. In 1861, he was assigned to be a teamster for wagon trains crossing the plains (see “Gustave Anderson: His Life and Families,” 26–27).

He and his family resided for many years in Hyrum, Cache County, Utah. There he helped construct the rock church in 1869, and there he formed an investment partnership in a molasses mill (see “Gustave Anderson: His Life and Families,” 32–34).

Gustave became a United States citizen on 17 May 1877. In 1878 he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 20 November 1878, and was assigned to labor in the Christiania Conference. At the close of his mission, he left Copenhagen on the steamer Albion on 30 August 1879 bound for America (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 235–36, 240).

Returning to Hyrum, he was welcomed by family and friends. He continued his labors for the Church in the Forty-first Quorum of the Seventy. Because he practiced plural marriage, he was imprisoned from June to November 1887 for unlawful cohabitation. Two years before his death, his eyesight failed (see “Gustave Anderson: His Life and Families,” 38–45). He died in 1911 in Hyrum at age ninety.


Gustave Albert Anderson

(Gustaf Andersson)

1850–1928

Residence: Grantsville, Tooele Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 6 November 1882

Missionary labors: Göteborg and Copenhagen conferences

Departure date from Copenhagen: 25 August 1884

Name of departure ship: Panther

Birth date: 3 January 1850

Birthplace: Östebyn, Grinstad, Älvsborg, Sweden

Father: Andersson, Anders

Mother: Andersdotter, Cajsa

Spouse: Hunter, Emily Jennie

Marriage date: 22 February 1874

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 22 April 1928

Death place: Grantsville, Tooele Co., Utah

Burial place: Grantsville, Tooele Co., Utah

Gustave, the youngest child of Anders Anderson, was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on 2 December 1861 by A. Peterson. Soon after his baptism, Gustave’s father sold the family farm in Sweden. With money from the sale, he bought passage for his family on an ocean vessel bound for America. In 1862, the family crossed the plains in the Captain Joseph Horne ox team company. On 1 October 1862, they arrived in the Salt Lake Valley (see Clark, “Gustave Anderson,” 1).

The Anderson family settled in Grantsville, Tooele County, Utah. The first winter in Grantsville, they lived with the Stromberg family in a one-room cabin. Seventeen people managed to live this way until spring. In the spring, the Andersons built a home of their own and began tending sheep and farming. Gustave had little opportunity for formal schooling because he helped with these family enterprises (see Nelson, “History of Gustaf Anderson,” 1).

In 1882, he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 6 November 1882 and was assigned to labor in the Göteborg and Copenhagen conferences. He served for many months in the Gothenburg (Göteborg County) and Vingåker (Södermanland County) branches. At the close of the mission, Gustave boarded the steamer Panther on 25 August 1884 bound for the states (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 268–69, 279).

Soon after his return to Grantsville, he was ordained a high priest and was set apart as an alternate member of the Tooele Stake high council on 6 November 1887 by Heber J. Grant. He was set apart as second counselor in the Grantsville Ward on 7 July 1888 and then as first counselor in 1890. He served as a counselor in the Grantsville bishopric from 1888 to 1906 (see Nelson, “History of Gustaf Anderson,” 2).

Civically, Gustave served as mayor of Grantsville twice—from 1898 to 1899 and from 1902 to 1903. He also served on the city council for fourteen years and several terms as president of the South Willow Irrigation Company. He was involved in many businesses, including the Richville Milling Company and a co-op store (see Brown, “Gustave Anderson,” 3).

Family members claim that he owned one of the first Ford cars in Tooele County. But being used to a horse and buggy, he was never a good driver. They explained, “When he wanted to stop he would pull on the steering wheel and holler, ‘Whoa’” (Brown, “Gustave Anderson,” 3–4).

In his old age, Gustave carried peppermint candy in his pocket to give to his grandchildren. He died at age seventy-eight walking home from a Church meeting. He suffered from a fatal heart attack and tried to catch himself on a picket fence. When his body was found, his wrist was caught between two of the fence pickets (see Clark, “Gustave Anderson,” 2).

One descendant recalled, “Gustave was a sincere, honest and frank person absolutely without guile, and because of his trust of others he was badly cheated and lost a lot of money . . . , but he never lost his faith” (Nelson, “History of Gustaf Andersson,” 3). Despite such losses, he became the second-wealthiest man in Tooele County (see Clark, “Gustave Anderson,” 2).


Håkan Anderson

1822–84

Residence: Kanosh, Millard Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 4 May 1883

Missionary labors: Stockholm Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 15 June 1883

Name of departure ship: Pacific (Milo)

Birth date: 4 May 1822

Birthplace: Hörröd, Hörröd, Kristianstad, Sweden

Father: Olsson, Anders

Mother: Arnesdotter, Bengta

Spouse: Nielsen, Mariane Marie

Marriage date: 14 September 1853

Marriage place: Frederiksberg, Copenhagen, Denmark

Spouse: Sanderson, Sarah Lize

Death date: 26 August 1884

Death place: Meadow, Millard Co., Utah

Burial place: Anderson Family Cemetery, Meadow, Millard Co., Utah

When Håkan was eighteen years old, he worked as a valet for a wealthy nobleman. He traveled with the nobleman to Egypt, France, Norway, Sweden, Germany, and Austria. During these excursions, he learned seven languages. This skill enabled him to later accept employment as a manager and interpreter on the docks and shipyards of Copenhagen (see correspondence from Golda A. Adams).

On 15 April 1854, Håken was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. His wife Mariane was baptized four years later. Because of their affiliation with Mormonism, they were both fired from their jobs. Their dismissals led directly to their decision to immigrate to America in 1862 (see correspondence from Golda A. Adams).

Soon after their arrival in Utah, Håkan accepted employment in a flour mill in Fillmore, Millard County. The flour dust bothered him so greatly that he left the mill and began homesteading in Meadow, Millard County, Utah. He succeeded in diverting water from the canyon to irrigate his arid property (see correspondence from Golda A. Adams).

From 1881 to 1883, he operated a store in Kanosh, Millard County (correspondence from J. Douglas Carr, 12 July 1999). He left this enterprise in 1883 to accept a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 4 May 1883 and was assigned to labor in the Stockholm Conference (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 269, 273). He was not able to complete this assignment due to illness (see correspondence from J. Douglas Carr, 12 July 1999). Håkan died a little over a year after his return to Meadow at age sixty-two.


Jens Anderson

(Jöns Andersson)

1833–1914

Residence: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 2 June 1877

Missionary labors: Göteborg, Ålborg, and Skåne conferences

Departure date from Copenhagen: 23 June 1879

Name of departure ship: Cato

Birth date: 29 April 1833

Birthplace: Lund, Malmöhus, Sweden

Father: Jönsson, Anders (Paul)

Mother: Andersdotter, Elna

Spouse: Petersen, Helen (Lana) Margaret

Marriage date: 13 March 1857

Marriage place: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

Spouse: Berlin, Christine Ulrike

Marriage date: 14 July 1880

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 12 February 1914

Death place: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

Burial place: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

On 27 July 1853, Jens joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Soon after his baptism by Elder Capson, he immigrated to America. He crossed the plains in an independent ox team company under the leadership of Captain Olsen. By October 1854, he had settled in Ephraim, Sanpete County, Utah. In that settlement, he helped build a fort and attempted to raise a crop, which was devoured by grasshoppers (see History of Sanpete and Emery Counties, Utah, 295).

In 1866, he journeyed to the Missouri River to help other Latter-day Saint immigrants reach the valley. After taking part in the Black Hawk War, he was called to settle in Circle Valley, Sevier County. In that community, he built his home and served on the city council for five years before being driven out by Native Americans and losing all that he had acquired (see History of Sanpete and Emery Counties, Utah, 295).

In 1877, he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 2 June 1877 and was assigned to labor in the Göteborg, Skåne, and Ålborg conferences. He presided over the Skåne Conference from 1878 to 1879. At the close of an honorable mission, he boarded the steamer Cato in Copenhagen on 23 June 1879 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 230–31, 240, 483).

After his return to Utah, he served for several years as a president of a quorum of the Seventy (see History of Sanpete and Emery Counties, Utah, 295). He died in 1914 in Ephraim, Sanpete County, Utah, at age eighty.


James Jorgen Anderson

(Jens Jørgen Anderssen)

1838–1914

Residence: Fountain Green, Sanpete Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 1885

Missionary labors: Århus and Skåne conferences

Departure date from Copenhagen: 18 August 1887

Name of departure ship: Bravo

Birth date: 17 September 1838

Birthplace: Nybølle, Hillerslev, Svendborg, Denmark

Father: Hansen, Anders Plov

Mother: Rasmusdatter, Anne Katherine

Spouse: Eskesen (Eskelsen), Anne Kirstine

Marriage date: 26 October 1867

Marriage place: Denmark

Death date: 18 January 1914

Death place: Fountain Green, Sanpete Co., Utah

Burial place: Fountain Green, Sanpete Co., Utah

Jens grew to manhood in Ribe, Denmark. He was a soldier in the Schleswig-Holstein War. After the war, he was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on 22 November 1870. Following his baptism, he crossed the Atlantic to the United States aboard the Minnesota (see “The Early Life of James and Ane Anderson,” 11–18).

By the fall of 1872, Jens had settled in Fountain Green, Sanpete County, Utah. While living in Fountain Green, he received a mission call to Scandinavia. After arriving in the mission field, Jens was assigned to serve on the islands of Fyen and Langeland—part of the Århus Conference. On 17 January 1886, while holding a Church meeting at Odense, he was arrested for preaching Mormonism. After acknowledging that he was a “Mormon” and an American citizen, Jens was banished from Denmark. He served the remainder of his mission in the Skåne Conference (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 51).

In 1887, he returned to Fountain Green, where he specialized in growing alfalfa, grain, and sugar beets. He also became an expert woodcutter and a beekeeper. According to his descendants, “In all his work he was meticulous; even the outbuildings on his farm were spotless” (“The Early Life of James and Ane Anderson,” 21).

Jens was secretary of the teaching program in the Fountain Green Ward for many years. His grandchildren remember him as “a powerful man—not tall but husky and strong” (“The Early Life of James and Ane Anderson,” 20). Jens died in 1914 in Fountain Green at age seventy-five.


John Anderson

(Johan Andersen)

1830–93

Residence: Fillmore, Millard Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 3 June 1882

Missionary labors: Stockholm Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 4 April 1884

Name of departure ship: Milo

Birth date: 24 February 1830

Birthplace: Vørum, Kippinge, Maribo, Denmark

Father: Pedersen Wæver, Anders

Mother: Amentszøl, Marie Kirstine

Spouse: Thomsen, Fredrika

Marriage date: 16 November 1869

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Rasmussen, Karen Maria

Marriage date: 8 July 1874

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Justesen, Maren

Marriage date: 8 July 1874

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Sorensen, Karen Kirstina

Marriage date: 8 July 1874

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Hansen, Luisa (Louisa)

Marriage date: 30 Nov 1874

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Larsen, Maren Sophi

Marriage date: 13 May 1891

Marriage place: Manti, Sanpete Co., Utah

Death date: 13 May 1893

Death place: Fillmore, Millard Co., Utah

Burial place: Fillmore, Millard Co., Utah

John was baptized by Peter Thomsen on 4 December 1853. He immigrated to the United States on 6 April 1862 and became a farmer in Gunnison, Sanpete County. John received his endowment on 16 November 1869 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah. On 3 April 1871, he moved to Richfield, Sevier County, and then to St. David, Cochise County, Arizona, in December 1877.

After that, John moved to Fillmore, Millard County, Utah, from where he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1882. He arrived in Copenhagen on 3 June 1882 and was assigned to labor in the Stockholm Conference. After completing an honorable mission, he boarded the steamer Milo on 4 April 1884 bound for the States (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 267–68, 278).

He died of dropsy in 1893 in Fillmore at age fifty-four.


John Anderson

(Johannes Andersson)

1850–1936

Residence: Salina, Sevier Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 29 September 1891

Missionary labors: Stockholm Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 5 October 1893

Birth date: 31 October 1850

Birthplace: Skälby, Veckholm, Uppsala, Sweden

Father: Andersson, Anders

Mother: Haglund, Clara

Spouse: Harner, Edla Sophia

Marriage date: 10 October 1876

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 31 January 1936

Death place: Salina, Sevier Co., Utah

Burial place: Pioneer Cemetery, Salina, Sevier Co., Utah

John was one of eight children. His childhood and youth were filled with hardship and toil. He was baptized on 6 February 1870 in Sweden. He served a local mission from 1871 to 1874 on Götland Island. He was president of the Uppsala Branch until his release in 1875 (see Journal of John Anderson; Bitton, Guide to Mormon Diaries and Autobiographies, 9).

John immigrated to America and became an early resident of Salina, Sevier County, Utah, having moved to the area in 1875. He supported himself and his family by making adobe bricks and building houses. He served as the director of the United Order in 1877 (see Journal of John Anderson; Bitton, Guide to Mormon Diaries and Autobiographies, 9).

John accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1891. He arrived in Copenhagen on 29 September 1891 and was assigned to labor in the Stockholm Conference. After serving faithfully for two years, he departed from Copenhagen on 5 October 1893 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 320–21, 333).

Returning to Salina, he took an active role in the Salina Second Ward. In the ward, he served as superintendent of the Sunday School and as president of the YMMIA. He also served on the local school board (see “Honored Pioneer Laid to Final Rest,” Salina Sun, 7 February 1936).

During his later years, physical ailments confined him to his home. His love for books and reading kept him informed of the outside world. His wife preceded him in death by fourteen years. John died from a lingering illness in 1936 at age eighty-six (see “Honored Pioneer Laid to Final Rest,” Salina Sun, 7 February 1936). He kept three journals in Swedish that are valuable to his posterity. They are currently housed in the Church Archives (see Journal of John Anderson; Bitton, Guide to Mormon Diaries and Autobiographies, 9).


John Anderson

(Johan Ericksson or Andersson)

1862–93

Residence: Fountain Green, Sanpete Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 28 September 1886

Missionary labors: Stockholm Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 27 September 1888

Birth date: 28 December 1862

Birthplace: Husby, Stavby, Uppsala, Sweden

Father: Andersson, Erick

Mother: Wässblad (Westblad), Maria Catharina (Jansson)

Spouse: Bischoff, Eliza Maria

Marriage date: 28 November 1888

Marriage place: Manti Temple, Manti, Sanpete Co., Utah

Death date: 18 August 1893

Death place: Fountain Green, Sanpete Co., Utah

Burial place: Fountain Green, Sanpete Co., Utah

At age fourteen, John was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. A mob threatened to drown the missionary who performed his baptism but did not carry out the threat. After his baptism, John walked home in wet clothing in cold weather but suffered no illness from the exposure (see “Life Sketch of John Anderson,” 1).

In 1877, his grandfather, who had also joined the Church, paid the fare of John and other family members to immigrate to the United States. They voyaged across the Atlantic Ocean and traversed the United States by train to reach Utah (see “Life Sketch of John Anderson,” 1).

The family settled in Fountain Green, Sanpete County, Utah. As John grew to manhood, he fell in love with Eliza Bischoff and wanted to marry her in the Logan Temple. Since it was closed due to antipolygamy laws, John determined to serve a mission before marrying his sweetheart (see “Life Sketch of John Anderson,” 1).

On 6 September 1886, he was set apart as a Scandinavian missionary by President Heber J. Grant. He arrived in Copenhagen on 28 September 1886 and was assigned to labor in the Stockholm Conference. During this mission, he received permission to spend the Christmas holidays with his brother Anders and his wife, whom he baptized. After completing the mission, John departed from Copenhagen on 27 September 1888 (see “Life Sketch of John Anderson,” 2).

Returning to Utah, John married Eliza in the Manti Temple. He supported his wife by working as an agent for the Co-op Machine Company and selling furniture. He and Eliza were the parents of three children prior to his death from typhoid fever at age thirty. His wife had their fourth child after his demise (see “Life Sketch of John Anderson,” 2).

A descendant of John recorded that he was “friendly with everyone” and “well-liked.” He also recalled that his wife could tell when he was near because he whistled or sang. John had the reputation of being a “thrifty, industrious man—always working.” He was a devoted student, especially of the gospel. He once said, “I want to gain all the knowledge I can here, for all that I learn here I won’t have to learn hereafter” (“Life Sketch of John Anderson,” 2).


John Andrew Anderson

(Anders Johan Andersson)

1850–1922

Residence: Santaquin, Utah Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 4 May 1888

Missionary labors: Göteborg Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 7 August 1890

Birth date: 23 November 1850

Birthplace: Bäcken, Grinstad, Älvsborg, Sweden

Father: Andersson, Anders

Mother: Esbjörnsdotter, Cajsa

Death date: 5 December 1922

Death place: Santaquin, Utah Co., Utah

Burial place: Santaquin, Utah Co., Utah

John was baptized into The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on 31 July 1864 by Carl Johanson. He immigrated to the United States in September 1877 (see Scandinavian Mission Index). Once in the United States, he changed his name to John Andrew Anderson. After arriving in Utah with his two children, John and Matilda, he settled in the Union Ward in West Jordan, Salt Lake County. From West Jordan, he moved to Santaquin, Utah County, where he farmed thirty-five acres and owned twelve shares of irrigation water (see correspondence from Marrilyn Haynes).

John worked on the railroad as a section hand when he wasn’t farming. This work took him to many communities in central Utah to lay tracks, place ties, and drive spikes. When he quit the railroad, he was paid one thousand four hundred dollars (see correspondence from Marrilyn Haynes).

In 1888, he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 4 May 1888 and was assigned to labor in the Göteborg Conference. After completing an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 7 August 1890 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 307–15).

In his absence, “the love of his life married another man.” John chose not to remarry. His biographer wrote, “He devoted his life to the church, mostly as a silent listener.” He died at age seventy-seven in 1922 at the home of his sister, Mrs. John Backman, following a lingering illness. Funeral services were held in the Santaquin Ward (see “Santaquin Resident Buried,” Sunday Herald, 10 December 1922).


John August Anderson

(Johan August Johannesson)

1844–1920

Residence: Monroe, Sevier Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 6 June 1892

Missionary labors: Göteborg Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 7 June 1894

Name of departure ship: Bravo

Birth date: 18 December 1844

Birthplace: Huset #385, St. Petri-Malmö, Malmöhus, Sweden

Father: Andersson, Johannes

Mother: Perhsdotter, Mårta

Spouse: Nielsen (Eriksdotter), Maria Ann

Marriage date: 20 September 1869

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Petersson, Hannah Pearsson

Spouse: Mickelson, Stina Larson

Marriage date: 29 June 1893

Marriage place: Manti Temple, Manti, Sanpete Co., Utah

Death date: 1 February 1920

Death place: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

Burial place: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

Unfortunately, while John was just a young child, a pea lodged in his ear. The local doctor “rotted out” his ear to remove the pea. As a result, John was slightly deaf in that ear (see “Journal of John August Anderson, Brother of Anna Catharina Anderson,” 1).

He attended school from ages seven to ten. At age ten, he obtained work in a cigar factory. He worked in the factory for five years. During these years, he was beaten and even slashed with a knife. At age fifteen, he was employed in a chicory factory (see “Journal of John August Anderson, Brother of Anna Catharina Anderson,” 1).

His parents were the first to become interested in Mormonism. John was also drawn to the gospel message and was baptized on 4 April 1858 by Nils Larsen. In 1861, he served his first mission. He was instructed “to sell books and teach the gospel as he knew it” (Journal of John August Anderson). He labored in three branches—Hörby (Malmöhus County), Nävlinge (Kristianstad County), and Viggarum (Långaröd) (Malmöhus County) (see “Journal of John August Anderson, Brother of Anna Catharina Anderson,” 1).

After this mission, John left Sweden bound for America. He arrived in New York Harbor aboard the vessel John J. Boyd. Aboard ship were eight hundred passengers—all Latter-day Saints. He and his traveling companions crossed the plains in wagons drawn by oxen. John did not migrate immediately to Salt Lake City. He stopped at Fort Laramie, where he was hired to drive teams for twenty-five dollars a month. It was at the fort that he learned to speak English. He reached the Salt Lake Valley on 27 September 1863 and settled first in Ephraim, Sanpete County, and then in Circleville, Piute County (see “Journal of John August Anderson, Brother of Anna Catharina Anderson,” 2–3). In Circleville, he lived in a dugout.

While residing in that community, he accepted the call by Brigham Young to help emigrants reach Utah. He served as a teamster for the emigrants. During his absence, Circleville was destroyed by Native Americans. After its destruction, he returned to Ephraim (see “Journal of John August Anderson, Brother of Anna Catharina Anderson,” 3). In Ephraim, John was employed as a laborer and a railroad constructionist.

He met his wife, Maria Nielsen, at a barn dance in the community. Of his marriage day, John wrote, “This I consider one of the most remarkable days of my existence.” It was even more remarkable to him than the day he received his naturalization papers in November 1875 (see “Journal of John August Anderson, Brother of Anna Catharina Anderson,” 3–4).

While a resident of Monroe, Sevier County, Utah, John accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. At that time, he had three children less than six years old. He wrote to the President of the Church explaining his situation. Within a week an answer came: “If Brother Anderson is a good man we want him to go.” He penned, “I was much overcome in my feelings to have to leave my dear ones for such a long time” (“Journal of John August Anderson, Brother of Anna Catharina Anderson,” 9–10).

John arrived in Copenhagen on 6 June 1892 and was assigned to labor in the Göteborg Conference. During the first year of his mission, he traveled across Sweden and into Denmark and Norway. He penned, “The time is good for holding meetings, for the people are very willing to come and hear our doctrines preached, although so few are able to distinguish between right and wrong.” He also wrote, “Went down to the harbor and saw a brother sail for America; was wishing it had been me” (“Journal of John August Anderson, Brother of Anna Catharina Anderson,” 34) After completing this mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 7 June 1894 aboard the steamer Bravo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 323, 328, 330, 337).

Upon reaching Salt Lake City, John stopped to see President Wilford Woodruff and “was glad to see the old man look so hearty and well.” After returning home, he wrote, “Found everything at home prosperous and doing well and was happy to once more be with my own” (“Journal of John August Anderson, Brother of Anna Catharina Anderson,” 35).

To support his family, John taught school. He also served as a city councilor, city recorder, assessor, and city collector. He was the superintendent of the Community Cooperative Store from 1888 to 1895. In 1896, he slipped on ice and fractured his left hip bone, which forced him to rely on a cane the rest of his life and to relinquish some of his community service (see “Journal of John August Anderson, Brother of Anna Catharina Anderson,” 5).

Impairment did not prevent him from accepting a second mission call to Scandinavia. On 22 April 1903, he arrived in Copenhagen and was assigned to labor in the Bergen Conference (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 400). After completing a successful mission, he returned to Monroe, where he took an active role in the dramatic association. John died after a short illness in 1920 in Ephraim at age seventy-five (see “Journal of John August Anderson, Brother of Anna Catharina Anderson,” 6).


John C. Anderson

(Johannes Andersson)

1835–1912

Residence: Grantsville, Tooele Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 15 November 1873

Missionary labors: Stockholm Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 22 June 1876

Name of departure ship: Otto

Birth date: 22 October 1835

Birthplace: Viken, Ånimskog, Älvsborg, Sweden

Father: Andersson, Anders

Mother: Andersdotter, Cajsa

Spouse: Clark, Mary Ann

Marriage date: 4 May 1867

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 4 June 1912

Death place: Grantsville, Tooele Co., Utah

Burial place: Grantsville, Tooele Co., Utah

Like his father, John was an agriculturist from his youth. He learned in his home to persecute Mormon missionaries, “to hate the Mormons so much that he said he could kill the first Mormon he saw. Soon he was put to the test. One day two Mormon missionaries were preaching in their town. John, with others, went to hear what they had to say. They went out of curiosity, and to the amazement of all who knew him, John was converted at once and was baptized in [22 October] 1860” (Anderson, “History of Anders and Kajsa Andersson,” 1).

John’s extended family, totaling twenty-two relatives, were baptized within two years (see Anderson, “History of Anders and Kajsa Andersson,” 1). John was called to labor as a local missionary and presided over the Rostock Branch for about two years. In that capacity, he was called before a local priest and government authorities and sentenced to twenty-eight days in prison. One source states that he was sentenced to death for “sacrilegious use of the Sacraments.” However, he was released on bail (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 2:237).

After his release, he and his family immigrated to America (see “Day Book of John Anderson,” 1). They arrived in the Salt Lake Valley in the fall of 1862 nearly penniless and had to sleep on the ground the first week. They settled in Grantsville, Tooele County, Utah, where they prospered as farmers. John became a citizen of the United States on 26 July 1871 (see Anderson, “History of Anders and Kajsa Andersson,” 1–2).

He received his mission call to Sweden at the October general conference of 1873. He arrived in Copenhagen on 15 November 1873 and was assigned to labor in the Stockholm Conference (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 215). He served in the communities of Nyhyttan (Kopparberg County), Vergsbo, Hedemora (Kopparberg County), Malmköping (Södermanland County), and Sundsvall (Västernorrland). “I bore my testimony to the people, who treated me well,” he wrote. He presided over the Stockholm Branch from July to November 1874. In May 1875 he and his companion had an unusual experience:

We felt very humble and fasted and prayed for wisdom and strength to go forward in righteousness and holiness before the Lord. We besieged [sic] him to strengthen Karolina Brig, who had been bedridden for nearly five years. Her body had shrunk from her long and painful illness. . . . On the 16th day of we administered to her. We could feel the power of healing from the Lord, and she was made well instantaneously, and got up and prepared a meal for us. We all rejoiced together. (“Day Book of John Anderson,” 2)

He departed from Copenhagen on 22 June 1876 aboard the steamer Otto (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 225).

In 1882, he became a member of the Tooele Stake high council, and served in that position until 1905 (see “Day Book of John Anderson,” 2). At the end of his life, he was ill. His daughter cared for him. It was said of John that he loved music. His favorite hymn was “An Angel from on High” (see Anderson, “History of Anders and Kajsa Andersson,” 1–2) He died in 1912 in Grantsville at age seventy-five.


John Hyrum Anderson

1864–1945

Residence: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 4 May 1883

Missionary labors: Malmö Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 15 June 1885

Name of departure ship: Wisconsin

Birth date: 24 September 1864

Birthplace: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Father: Anderson, Johannes

Mother: Olson, Johanna

Spouse: Eliason, Anna Charlotte

Marriage date: 18 November 1885

Marriage place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Spouse: Eliason, Selma Natalie

Marriage date: 20 October 1886

Marriage place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Death date: 10 June 1945

Burial place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

John grew to manhood in Logan, Cache County, Utah. He wore homespun clothes and went barefoot, even to church. In his youth, John spent his summers farming so he could attend school the rest of the year. According to his autobiography, he “was inspired to study Swedish” on his own time and became fluent enough to read the New Testament in Swedish. This was good preparation for the mission call soon to come (see Anderson, “Experiences in the Life of John Hyrum Anderson, 1864–1945,” 5).

At age eighteen, John was called on a mission to Sweden. His parents cried because he had never been out of Cache Valley. By his own account, John was a willing servant:

This call was in answer to my prayers. I had often prayed that the time would come when I should go on a mission to preach the gospel. I had a keen desire to go to the Indians and explain the gospel; I thought this was because I had read the Book of Mormon. I also had a desire to go to the Southern states, but when the call came to go to Sweden, that was just the place I wanted to go. The spirit of the mission came to me when I received the call like a sign from the living God. (Anderson, “Experiences in the Life of John Hyrum Anderson,” 1864–1945, 5)

His mother did not receive the news as well as he did. “The shock was so sudden my Mother took sick,” John wrote. John and his father prayed for her health, and were rewarded for their faith: “Our prayers were answered, my Mother recovered almost instantly” (Anderson, “Experiences in the Life of John Hyrum Anderson, 1864–1945,” 5).

John arrived in Copenhagen on 4 May 1883 and was assigned to labor in the Malmö Conference (see correspondence from Ron Curtis, 22 June 1999). He labored in the Hälsingborg Branch (Malmöhus County), the same area his parents had lived. He later presided over the Kristianstad Branch (Kristianstad County). He wrote of his missionary experiences:

I was never contented to remain idle or to waste my time. I constantly traveled, tracting and going from house to house bearing witness to the truth and explaining the Gospel. I walked thousands of miles during the twenty-nine months I was on my mission. I did not consider it much of a job to walk fifteen or twenty miles in one day. . . . The road was wet and muddy. In the afternoon we sat down by a stream of water, took off our shoes, washed our swollen feet, then continued our march. The next day I wore a pair of wooden bottom shoes or slippers, as I could not put my shoes on. I felt quite content to stand in a pair of wooden bottom shoes and preach the Gospel. (Anderson, “Experiences in the Life of John Hyrum Anderson, 1864–1945,” 12)

At the close of his mission, John departed from Copenhagen aboard the steamer Wisconsin on 15 June 1885 (see correspondence from Ron Curtis, 22 June 1999). He had been ill for six months with infected tonsils and left the mission early. Of his departure, he wrote, “I felt just as badly about leaving the mission field as I had felt about leaving my home to go on to the mission field” (Anderson, “Experiences in the Life of John Hyrum Anderson, 1864–1945,” 12).

After returning to Utah, John worked for ZCMI. By 1893, he was in charge of one of the ZCMI stores. In 1897, he opened his own store in Logan. By 1890, he had 160 acres on which he planted wheat and rye. He was also employed in banking, becoming president of the First National Bank of Logan. He was elected mayor of Logan in 1909 (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:767).

He held many positions in the Church, including member of the stake high council, bishop of the Mendon Ward and of the Logan Fourth Ward, a temple worker in 1885 and again in 1933, and president of the Swedish Mission from 1925 to 1926 (see correspondence from Ron Curtis, 22 June 1999).

He said near the end of his life, “I am just as positive that this Church is ordained of God as I am that I live.” One of his favorite sayings was, “A contented mind is worth more than wealth, especially if you can face the world and feel your heart.” He also said, “The only time to retire is when our physical bodies are worn out” (Anderson, “Experiences in the Life of John Hyrum Anderson, 1864–1945,” 26–29). He was buried in 1945 in Logan after his death at age eighty.


Niels Anderson

(Nils Persson)

1836–1910

Residence: West Jordan, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 4 May 1885

Missionary labors: Göteborg Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 7 April 1887

Name of departure ship: Panther

Birth date: 4 May 1836

Birthplace: Svenstorp, Svedala, Malmö, Sweden

Father: Andersson, Pehr

Mother: Olsdotter, Sissa

Spouse: Anderson, Hannah Pehrson

Marriage date: 25 October 1862

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 1 July 1910

Death place: Midvale, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Burial place: Midvale City Cemetery, Midvale, Salt Lake Co., Utah

On 27 August 1859, Niels was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Two years after his baptism, he immigrated to America. He and his wife met on the journey to the Salt Lake Valley. After their marriage, they settled on the east side of the Jordan River. They lived in a dugout north of the West Jordan Cemetery before moving to Fairview, Sanpete County. In that community, they encountered problems with the Native Americans. Niels fought in the Black Hawk War. After the war, he was employed as a farm laborer and worked on the railroad (see Youngberg, Conquerors of the West, 80–81).

In 1885, he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 4 May 1885 and was assigned to labor in the Göteborg Conference. After serving an honorable mission, he boarded the steamer Panther in Copenhagen on 7 April 1887 to return to the States (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 293, 295, 302).

He returned to West Jordan, where he was selected to be the second counselor in the West Jordan stake presidency. During his years in the community, he lived on the southeast corner of Allen and Lennox streets. He is remembered for hauling the first load of rock from Little Cottonwood Canyon on 6 January 1896 for the meetinghouse in Midvale, Salt Lake County (see Kirkham, Tales of a Triumphant People, 242–43).

Family tradition suggests that during his years in Midvale, he told his wife that Church officials said he could take another wife. She told him, “If you do, I will walk out.” He never entered into plural marriage (see Youngberg, Conquerors of the West, 81). Niels died of cancer in 1910 in Midvale at age seventy-four.


Niels August Anderson

(Nils August Johansson)

1858–1924

Residence: Benjamin, Utah Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 4 May 1885

Missionary labors: Christiania and Århus conferences

Departure date from Copenhagen: 30 May 1887

Name of departure ship: Argo

Birth date: 13 January 1858

Birthplace: Ekebro Bäckaryd, Hamneda, Kronoberg, Sweden

Father: Andersson, Johan

Mother: Håkansdotter, Nilla

Spouse: Michelsen, Jensine Svensson

Marriage date: 19 October 1882

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 19 July 1924

Death place: Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada

Burial place: Taber, Alberta, Canada

In 1867, Niels moved from Sweden to Denmark. In Denmark he joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. In 1878, he left Scandinavia hopeful of joining with the Saints in Utah (see correspondence from Jalene Paxman, 19 July 1999).

He eventually arrived in Utah and settled in Benjamin, Utah County. While living in Benjamin, he received a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 4 May 1885 and was assigned to labor in the Hedemarken Branch of the Christiania Conference. He later labored in the communities of Ringsaker (Hedemark County, Norway), Lillihammer (Hedemark County, Norway), and Klokklerjaarden. On 11 November 1886, he returned to Denmark to complete his mission. His journal entries reflect that he enjoyed being in Denmark and sharing the gospel with old acquaintances (see correspondence from Bethe C. Hatch, 1 July 1999). He departed from Copenhagen aboard the sailing vessel Argo on 30 May 1887 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 293, 295, 302).

After Niels returned to Benjamin, he and his wife had eight children. In 1903, Niels and his family moved to Raymond, Alberta, Canada. They later homesteaded in Barnwell, Alberta (see correspondence from Jalene Paxman, 19 July 1999). Niels died in 1924 in Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada, at age sixty-six.


Niels William Anderson

1858–1944

Residence: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 12 September 1882

Missionary labors: Stockholm Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 4 April 1884

Name of departure ship: Milo

Birth date: 15 November 1858

Birthplace: Ephraim, Sanpete, Utah

Father: Anderson, Niels

Mother: Poulson, Ingeborg

Spouse: Luke, Mary Emily

Marriage date: 17 August 1882

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 6 July 1944

Death place: Ogden, Weber Co., Utah

Burial place: Lot 24, Block 21, Plot A, Grave 3, Manti City Cemetery, Manti, Sanpete Co., Utah

Five days after his marriage to Mary Luke, Niels left on a mission to Scandinavia. On 12 September 1882, he arrived in Copenhagen and was assigned to labor in the Stockholm Conference. At the close of an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 4 April 1884 aboard the steamer Milo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 267–68, 278).

After returning to Utah, he and his wife resided in Manti, Sanpete County, and Price, Carbon County, before moving to Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County. At each of these locales, William obtained employment as a teacher. After retiring from teaching, he worked as a Utah representative for the Curtis Publishing Company. He was always active in the Church. He died in 1944 at the home of his daughter in Ogden, Weber County, Utah, at age eighty-five (see “Niels W. Anderson,” Deseret News, 7 July 1944).


Nils Anderson

1835–1913

Residence: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 30 May 1873

Missionary labors: Skåne Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 25 June 1875

Name of departure ship: Pacific (Cato)

Birth date: 26 November 1835

Birthplace: Lund, Malmöhus, Sweden

Father: Jönsson, Anders (Paul)

Mother: Andersdotter, Elna

Spouse: Paulsen, Ingeborg

Marriage date: 15 November 1857

Marriage place: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

Spouse: Jensen, Anne Christine

Marriage date: 19 September 1863

Spouse: Poulsen, Dorthea

Marriage date: 28 June 1871

Spouse: Nielson, Johanna

Marriage date: about 1874

Spouse: Petersen, Marie Petrea

Marriage date: 8 May 1876

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 11 June 1913

Death place: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

Burial place: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

On 23 January 1853, Nils was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints by E. G. Erikson. After his baptism, he labored as a local missionary in the Skåne Conference for two years. He and his family then immigrated to America (see History of Sanpete and Emery Counties, Utah, 297).

As they journeyed westward, Nils was called “from St. Louis to Iowa on a mission, then [to] preside over the branch at Weston, [Missouri]” (see History of Sanpete and Emery Counties, Utah, 297). After presiding over the branch, he crossed the plains with the Captain Matthias Cowley pioneering company in 1857.

He settled in Ephraim, Sanpete County, Utah, where he built a house inside the fort. Unfortunately, he was compelled to leave his home on account of Native American disturbances. He fought in the Black Hawk War, before being called to settle in Circle Valley in 1864 (see “Ancestry of James Peter Anderson and Martha Carolina Thomander—The Legacy of a Mormon Pioneer Family,” 119).

He built a home and farmed on his hundred acres in Circle Valley, Sevier County, for two years before trouble started again with the Native Americans. He abandoned his home and farm and returned to Ephraim in 1867. There he inquired about his former property and was told by the stake president that he had no property in Ephraim and that his home was in Circle Valley. His response led to a dispute and the removal of Nils’s name from Church records. According to the family, the stake president gave Nils’s property to his own son (see “Ancestry of James Peter Anderson and Martha Carolina Thomander—The Legacy of a Mormon Pioneer Family,” 119).

Although more than irritated, Nils remained with the Church and had his name returned to Church records. He accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1873. He arrived in Copenhagen on 30 May 1873 and was assigned to preside over the Skåne Conference. After completing this mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 25 June 1875 aboard either the Pacific or the Cato (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 214, 222).

Returning to Utah, Nils labored on the Manti Temple, served on a high council, and was a home missionary in Sanpete County, before being arrested for unlawful cohabitation and serving a six-month prison sentence (see correspondence from Erma A. Taylor). Nils died in 1913 in Ephraim at age seventy-seven. His biographer reported him to be a “short, stocky man who always wore a beard” (“Ancestry of James Peter Anderson and Martha Carolina Thomander—The Legacy of a Mormon Pioneer Family,” 119).


Nils Ole Anderson

(Nils Olasson)

1845–1926

Residence: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 4 May 1880

Missionary labors: Skåne Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 16 June 1882

Name of departure ship: Albano (Bravo)

Birth date: 20 September 1845

Birthplace: Slimminge, Malmöhus, Sweden

Father: Andersson, Ola

Mother: Borkersdotter, Anna

Spouse: Overlade, Josephine Marie

Marriage date: 2 November 1867

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Nielson, Mathilda

Marriage date: 18 December 1885

Marriage place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Death date: 28 September 1926

Death place: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

Burial place: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

In 1853, Nils’s parents joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and are credited with being the first to do so in Skurup, Malmöhus, Sweden. They resided in Skurup from 1847 to 1854. He was nine years old when he and his family immigrated to America. They crossed the plains in the ox team company of Captain Hogan to reach the Salt Lake Valley. They settled in Ephraim, Sanpete County, where Nils was baptized on 15 October 1855 by Frederick C. Sorensen (see “Niels Ole Anderson,” 133).

In Ephraim, Nils helped build the fort and served as a minute man in the Black Hawk War (see History of Sanpete and Emery Counties, Utah, 297–98). In 1866, he accepted a mission call to journey to the Missouri River to help stranded Latter-day Saint emigrants. Nils is remembered for serving six years on the Ephraim city council and for being part-owner of a sawmill at Canal Creek Canyon above Spring City, Sanpete County. Wood from his mill, which was later moved to Twelve Mile Canyon, was used in the construction of the Manti Temple (see “Niels Ole Anderson,” 135).

Most unusual about Nils was his delight in entertaining children with handmade puppets and his interest in cutting and preparing leather for braiding (see “Niels Ole Anderson,” 136).

He accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1880. He arrived in Copenhagen on 4 May 1880 and was assigned to labor in the Skåne Conference. On the mission, he presided over the Kristianstad, Hälsingborg, and Blekinge branches. After serving faithfully for over two years despite a severe illness, he departed from Copenhagen on 16 June 1882. From Liverpool to America, Nils was in charge of the migrating Latter-day Saints aboard the steamer Nevada (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 250–65).

Returning to Ephraim, he was appointed to serve as an alternate high council member in the South Sanpete Stake and as president of the YMMIA in Ephraim (see “Niels Ole Anderson,” 135).

In his older years he wore navy blue suits with pin stripes or white shirts and a watch and chain that were gold, and he was always neat and clean. He often sat on his north porch (see “Niels Ole Anderson,” 133). Niels died in 1926 in Ephraim at age eighty-one.


Peter Anderson

(Peder Andersen)

1836–1920

Residence: Peterson, Morgan Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 3 October 1882

Missionary labors: Christiania Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 9 June 1884

Name of departure ship: Milo

Birth date: 25 June 1836

Birthplace: Morterudsengen, Vestre Toten, Oppland, Norway

Father: Pedersen, Anders

Mother: Knudsdatter, Gunnild

Spouse: Hansen (Bredesen), Martha Ingeborg

Marriage date: 1856

Marriage place: Christiania, Christiania, Norway

Spouse: Gulbrandsen, Dorthea Maria

Marriage date: 11 December 1884

Marriage place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Death date: 1 April 1920

Death place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Burial place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

On 5 August 1860, Peter was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints by Peter Olson. He and his wife and two children immigrated to America the next year. They crossed the Atlantic aboard the Monarch of the Sea. They crossed the plains with the Samuel A. Wooley company and arrived on 22 September 1861 in the Salt Lake Valley (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 3:8).

In 1863, Peter and his wife settled in Peterson, Morgan County, Utah. In that community, Peter worked as a dyer, carpenter, and joiner (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 3:8; correspondence from Vena Andersen, 7 July 1999).

In 1882, he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 3 October 1882 and was assigned to labor in the Christiania Conference. After completing an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 9 June 1884 aboard the steamer Milo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 267, 269, 279, 294–95).

Returning to Utah, he was imprisoned for six months in the Utah penitentiary for unlawful cohabitation after refusing to leave either of his two families (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 3:8). He died in 1920 in Salt Lake City at age eighty-three.


Peter Magnus Anderson

(Petter Magnus Andersson)

1839–1914

Residence: Grantsville, Tooele Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 18 November 1884

Missionary labors: Skåne Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 12 August 1886

Name of departure ship: Bravo

Birth date: 22 January 1839

Birthplace: Viken, Ånismkog, Älvsborg, Sweden

Father: Andersson, Anders

Mother: Andersdotter, Cajsa

Spouse: Johnson, Augusta

Marriage date: 21 May 1868

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 7 August 1914

Death place: Grantsville, Tooele Co., Utah

Burial place: Grantsville, Tooele Co., Utah

In March 1861, Peter was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He immigrated to America in 1865 and settled in Grantsville, Tooele County, Utah (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 65). He made his living as a sheep raiser and a tailor. He enjoyed playing the violin when not working (see correspondence from Ida A. Durfee).

In 1884, Peter accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He was set apart for the mission by Orson Pratt. He arrived in Copenhagen on 18 November 1884 and was assigned to labor in the Skåne Conference. He served in the Kristianstad (Kirstianstad County) and Hälsingborg (Malmöhus County) branches. One biographer recorded details of his successful mission: “During his mission he held 183 meetings, baptized 17 persons, and traveled upwards of 4,000 miles” (Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 65). At the end of his mission, Peter boarded the steamer Bravo in Copenhagen on 12 August 1886 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 282–83, 298).

Returning to Utah, he served on the Tooele town council in 1888 (see Stenhouse, Utah Gazetteer and Directory of Salt Lake City, Ogden, and Provo and Logan Cities, 71). He was ordained a high priest at age seventy-five before his death from general debility in 1914. He was survived by his wife and seven children. His funeral was held in the Grantsville First Ward meetinghouse (see correspondence from Ida A. Durfee).


Jens Peter Andreasen

(Jens Peder Andersen)

1840–1917

Residence: Eden, Weber Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 19 September 1891

Missionary labors: Copenhagen and Århus Conferences

Departure date from Copenhagen: 8 June 1893

Name of departure ship: Bravo

Birth date: 23 March 1840

Birthplace: Arnager, Nylarsker, Bornholm, Denmark

Father: Pettersen, Anders

Mother: Jensdatter, Kirstine

Spouse: Frederiksen, Caroline Andrea

Marriage date: 2 May 1865

Marriage place: Nylarsker, Bornholm, Denmark

Spouse: Mouritzen, Mette Cathrine Ingeborg

Marriage date: 11 June 1871

Marriage place: Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark

Spouse: Nielsen, Jensine Christine

Death date: 12 April 1917

Death place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Burial place: Ogden, Weber Co., Utah

Both of Jens’s parents died when he was very young. He was baptized on 7 October 1863 by Jens Larsen. On 1 October 1869, he moved from the island of Bornholm to Copenhagen. After being ordained to the priesthood, he served a local mission from 1869 to 1871 on the island of Sjælland (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 2:250).

After his marriage to Catherine Mouritzen, he resided in Copenhagen until July 1879 when he and his family migrated to America. They settled in Eden, Weber County, Utah. In that community, Jens served as a president of the Seventy-fifth Quorum of the Seventy (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 2:250).

In 1891, he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 19 September 1891 and was assigned to labor in the Copenhagen and Århus conferences. He kept a diary of his missionary experiences from 1891 to 1893. He spent much of his mission on his native island of Bornholm. At the close of an honorable mission, he boarded the steamer Bravo in Copenhagen on 8 June 1893 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 320–21, 332).

After returning to Utah, Jens became a president of the Thirty-first Quorum of the Seventy. In August 1905 he moved to Ogden, Weber County. On 29 December 1907 he was ordained a high priest. After the death of his wife in 1908, Jens returned to Eden, where he served as a ward clerk (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 2:250). He died in 1917 in Salt Lake City at age seventy-seven.


Niels Anthon (Linderoth)

(Nils Gustafsson)

1862–1940

Residence: Spanish Fork, Utah Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 6 June 1888

Missionary labors: Stockholm Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 24 April 1890

Name of departure ship: Cameo

Birth date: 30 October 1862

Birthplace: Kävlinge, Malmöhus, Sweden

Father: Gustafsson (Anthon), Johan Gustave

Mother: Nilsdotter, Hannah

Spouse: Hansen, Caroline Jorgensen

Marriage date: 10 January 1884

Marriage place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Death date: 11 April 1940

Death place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Burial place: Salt Lake City Cemetery, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

As a child, Nils attended school in the winter and herded farm animals during the summer. At age thirteen, he was hired out to a local farmer for an entire year. At age fourteen, he became a communicant in the Lutheran Church. The last thing the priest said to him on that occasion was “never join the Mormon Church because they were the worst of all” (see “History of Niels Anthon and Caroline Hansen Anthon,” 1).

At age sixteen, Nils was apprenticed to a carriage maker. Three years later, he was a master of his trade and received a pass book from the board of Mechanical Trade, which allowed him to travel throughout Sweden. He was also allowed to choose a new name—Niels Anthon Linderoth (see “History of Niels Anthon and Caroline Hansen Anthon” 2).

In spite of the priest’s earlier warning, Nils joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in June 1882. That same month, he departed from Sweden bound for America. He journeyed aboard the Nevada from Liverpool to the United States (see “History of Niels Anthon and Caroline Hansen Anthon,” 2).

Nils first settled in Spanish Fork, Utah County, Utah, before gaining employment with the Denver and Rio Grande railroads. After acquiring enough money to send to Sweden so the rest of his family could secure passage to America, Nils returned to Spanish Fork, where he became a blacksmith and wheelwright (see “History of Niels Anthon and Caroline Hansen Anthon,” 2).

In the winter of 1888, Nils accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. Leaving his wife and child, he arrived in Copenhagen on 6 June 1888 and was assigned to labor in the Stockholm Conference. Early in this mission, a constable threatened to beat him and his companion because they were Mormon missionaries. They escaped by running into the woods. When Nils had been on his mission for only six weeks, he was called to preside over four hundred members in the Uppsala Branch, a university area in which many students and ministers opposed the Church (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 307, 313, 382–83).

When he had been on his mission for 18 months and had baptized fifty converts, a Lutheran council ordered him to stop preaching. He ignored the order. When a judge subpoenaed him, he bore his testimony before a court of law. Although the judge could find no case against him, Nils was sentenced to pay one hundred dollars or spend a hundred days in jail. To avoid the sentence, he was released from being president of the Eskilstuna Branch (Södermanland County), and left the area (see “History of Niels Anthon and Caroline Hansen Anthon,” 2).

News of his arrest preceded him to other localities. Ironically, this notoriety led people from far and near to come to see him. He organized a branch of thirty-five members—in spite of another Lutheran priest’s injunction against preaching (see “History of Niels Anthon and Caroline Hansen Anthon,” 3). After such a difficult but successful mission, Nils departed from Copenhagen on 24 April 1890 aboard the steamer Cameo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 307, 313, 382–83).

After returning to Spanish Fork, he served as a home missionary in Utah County for two years. In 1900, he was called on another mission to Scandinavia. He was assigned to labor in Sweden and to preside over the Stockholm District. During this mission, he baptized forty-five converts and adopted a four-year-old girl, whose mother was ill and eventually permanently hospitalized. After serving for two years and eight months, he was given responsibility for a company of Latter-day Saint immigrants bound for America (see “History of Niels Anthon and Caroline Hansen Anthon,” 3; correspondence from Floyd A. Swenson, 30 August 1999).

Returning once again to Spanish Fork, Nils was called to be a president of the Fiftieth Quorum of the Seventy. He also served as a home missionary in the Nebo Stake for two years, and as a counselor in a bishopric for six years (see “History of Niels Anthon and Caroline Hansen Anthon,” 3).

In 1911, he was called to preside over the Swedish Mission. He was excused from this assignment due to financial difficulties. In 1921, he moved to Salt Lake City and lived in a home on 83 D Street (see “History of Niels Anthon and Caroline Hansen Anthon,” 3). He died in 1940 in Salt Lake City at age seventy-seven.