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Tag Archives: Moses

Hanukkah and Christmas

Guest blog by Jeffrey R. Chadwick, Jerusalem Center Professor of Archaeology and Near Eastern Studies. Hanukkah, the Jewish Feast of Dedication, begins this Friday night at sundown. The Hebrew word Hanukkah actually means “dedication.” The eight-day festival in 2009 runs from Saturday, December 12, to Saturday, December 19. It is a holiday period of considerable

The Advent Season

Guest blog by Eric D. Huntsman, associate professor of ancient scripture at BYU. The term Advent comes from the Latin adventus, meaning “coming” or “appearance.” Beginning the fourth Sunday before Christmas, Advent helps Christians not only to celebrate the First Coming of Jesus Christ but also to look forward to his glorious Second Coming. Although

Yom Kippur: Day of Atonement

Guest blog by David Rolph Seely, professor of ancient scripture at BYU. The Day of Atonement—Yom Kippur in Hebrew—is the most solemn and holy day of the Israelite calendar. It falls on the tenth day of the seventh month, and this year (2009) it will begin at sundown on September 27. Ancient Israelites prepared themselves

Is There Anything New in Joseph Smith’s New Translation of the Bible?

Guest blog by Kent P. Jackson, professor of ancient scripture. This month we celebrate the 179th anniversary of something that most Latter-day Saints take for granted. It was in June 1830, just two months after the Church was organized, that the Prophet Joseph Smith began working on his Bible translation. Today we usually call it

Good Friday

This week’s blog was written by guest writer Eric D. Huntsman, associate professor of ancient scripture. During his conference talk of April 5, 2009, President Uchtdorf referred to Sunday morning as Palm Sunday. Looking forward to Easter, he encouraged members of the Church to focus their minds more fully on the great atoning sacrifice of

Joseph Smith: A Modern Witness of Jesus Christ

During December, our thoughts may turn to a wintry day in a small farmhouse in Vermont where Joseph Smith Jr. drew his first breath in 1805. Or we may ponder a hot, muggy Thursday afternoon in June 1844 when the Prophet drew his final breath.   During his lifetime, Joseph Smith was many things—a dutiful