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Tag Archives: Kent P. Jackson

Selma

Kent P. Jackson Professor of Ancient Scripture, BYU The current motion picture Selma has rekindled interest in the American civil rights movement. For many who see the movie, the setting is a distant time and place experienced only in film and in history books. But there are still millions alive who remember well the dramatic

Before New York

This month’s National Geographic magazine features a fascinating article by Peter Miller (“Before New York: Rediscovering the Wilderness of 1609,” 122–37). The article opens a window to the past—when the first European settlers began to explore and settle the island of Manhattan. Robert Clark provides stunning photographs, and Markley Boyer and Philip Staub add important

Is There Anything New in Joseph Smith’s New Translation of the Bible?

Guest blog by Kent P. Jackson, professor of ancient scripture. This month we celebrate the 179th anniversary of something that most Latter-day Saints take for granted. It was in June 1830, just two months after the Church was organized, that the Prophet Joseph Smith began working on his Bible translation. Today we usually call it

Wow! Ten Years!

We are now in our tenth year of publishing the Religious Educator (TRE). When Robert L. Millet (then dean of Religious Education at BYU) asked me to take the lead in this new venture, it forced me to think about the niche TRE might fill. Over the years, I found that it was important to

A Voice of Warning

Mormonism began with a book—the Book of Mormon (published in March 1830). During the next decade, many books were written and published by members and nonmembers to explain, understand, or attack the new faith. One of Mormonism’s early converts was Parley Parker Pratt (1807–57). He read the Book of Mormon and after a few days