P, Q

Susan Easton Black, Shauna C. Anderson Young, and Ruth Ellen Maness, section P and Q in Legacy of Sacrifice: Missionaries to Scandinavia, 1872–94 (Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, 2007), 345–76.

Levi Pearson

1866–1943

Residence: Peoa, Summit Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 19 February 1892

Missionary labors: Skåne Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 22 February 1893

Departure ship: Bravo

Birth date: 28 April 1866

Birthplace: Peoa, Summit Co., Utah

Father: Pearson, Ola

Mother: Bengtson, Sissa Jonson

Spouse: Maxwell, Ann

Marriage date: 15 May 1895

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Brown, Charlotte Ada

Marriage date: 8 June 1904

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Marchant, Mary Ann Casper

Marriage date: 5 June 1913

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 12 June 1943

Death place: Oakley, Summit Co., Utah

Burial place: Peoa Cemetery, Peoa, Summit Co., Utah

In 1866, Levi was born in a log cabin in Peoa, Summit County, Utah. As a child, he suffered from severe rheumatism, which caused him so much pain that he could not be moved except on a sheet. Like many other pioneers, Levi also suffered from hunger: “In order to build the church the families did their best and one way of helping was to board the imported laborers. One of the rock masons was staying with the Pearsons. On this particular night, the meal consisted of cornmeal mush. After the workman had heaped his bowl once and devoured it and started for a second helping, young Levi looked longingly at the bowl and sighed ‘goodbye mush’” (Pearson, “Levi Pearson,” 1).

He had little formal schooling. It consisted of learning to read and to do basic arithmetic in the winter, when his help wasn’t needed on the family farm. He acquired the equivalency of a fourth-grade education. Although in later years he always said he couldn’t do decimals, his wife would laugh and say that he had “no trouble counting money” (Pearson, “Levi Pearson,” 3).

As a young man, he sheared sheep for five or six cents a head, making three dollars a day. He also did some logging, but most of his life he was a farmer and a dairyman. He owned a farm near the mouth of Weber Canyon, where he raised hay, a large garden, and apples (see Pearson, “Levi Pearson,” 3).

Levi was one of two men in Summit County to obtain permission from the state engineer to build a reservoir in the Uintah Mountains. He helped develop the water resources of that area and put in place the irrigation systems and legal water rights still in use today (see “Stories about Levi Pearson,” 2).

In 1892, he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. Many people contributed to help finance his mission. Thirty-five dollars was received from the local Dramatic Association. Levi arrived in Copenhagen on 19 February 1892 and was assigned to labor in the Skåne Conference (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 327, 329). He suffered his share of hardships on the mission. His journal entry for 18 October 1893 records that he and his companion had difficulty getting food that day: “After going to two places without getting anything, we went to a ‘Herregard’ and tried to buy some but they told us they had none to sell but would give us some. So they gave each of us a piece of bread and meat in our hand. And we had to go out in the road and set [sic] down to eat it” (Pearson, “Levi Pearson,” 3–4).

On 20 October 1893, he wrote that he and his companion had to sleep in a barn: “[We] tried to get lodgings. We finally succeeded in getting permission to sleep in the straw in a large barn belonging to a bonde [sic] by the name of Ola Jonson who had a large fine house with plenty of room. But there was no room for us in the house.” Not all of his missionary experiences were difficult. “He met with members and non-members and relatives and on the whole, was well received” (Pearson, “Levi Pearson,” 4–5). He departed from Copenhagen on 22 February 1893 aboard the steamer Bravo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 337).

Two years after this mission, Levi married. At the time, he had only ten dollars, five of which he used to buy a stove. He and his bride settled in Oakley, Summit County. In the winter of 1897–98, Levi accepted a Mutual Improvement Mission to Tooele County. In that county, his wife Ann died of cancer. Levi served a home mission to Marion, Cassia County, Idaho, before marrying again. Unfortunately, his second wife died, also. Levi suffered much grief over the deaths of his wives. In answer to his prayers, he heard, “A mighty quiet and the peace that passeth all understanding filled my heart. Whatever of trouble or grief may befall me, I hope I shall be reconciled and in childlike trust acknowledge the Hand of God in all things” (Pearson, “Levi Pearson,” 6–7).

He served as a Summit County commissioner for three terms: 1911–12, 1920–21, and 1931–32. He also served on the high council of the Summit Stake from 1901 to 1927 and as patriarch of that stake from 1927 to 1943 (see Pearson, “Levi Pearson,” 8). Levi died of pancreatic cancer in 1943 in Oakley at age seventy-seven.


Soren Pedersen

(Søren Pedersen)

1840–1915

Residence: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 6 November 1882

Missionary labors: Århus Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 25 August 1884

Departure ship: Panther

Birth date: 24 November 1840

Birthplace: Nøttrup Mark, Rårup, Vejle, Denmark

Father: Hansen, Peder

Mother: Madsdatter, Ane Kirstina

Spouse: Laursen, Anna Sophia

Marriage date: 21 June 1867

Marriage place: aboard Manhattan

Death date: 21 May 1915

Death place: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

Burial place: Ephraim Cemetery, Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

In 1864, Soren was a soldier in the Danish-German War. After the war, he was baptized on 24 September 1865 by James N. Christensen and ordained an elder in 1866. He served a local mission until 1867 when he immigrated aboard the Manhattan to America. Aboard ship, he married Anna Sophia Laursen. The newlyweds settled in Ephraim, Sanpete County, Utah. There Soren fought in the Black Hawk War (see “Soren Pederson—1840–1915,” 1).

From 1871 to 1872, he walked seven miles from his home to work on the Manti Temple (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 201). A biographer said of him, “He was known for his devotion to principle and ceaseless, capable service to the Church and community” (“Soren Pederson—1840–1915,” 1).

Soren accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1882. He arrived in Copenhagen on 6 November 1882 and was assigned to labor in the Århus Conference. He completed an honorable mission before boarding the steamer Panther, which departed from Copenhagen on 25 August 1884 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 268, 279).

After this mission, Soren served as one of the presidents of the Forty-seventh Quorum of the Seventy (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 201). He also served as a local ward teacher, with the responsibility of collecting fast offerings in the Ephraim South Ward. He is remembered for his generosity and honesty and for his personal motto, “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you” (“Soren Pederson—1840–1915,” 1). He died in 1915 in Ephraim at age seventy-five.


Lars Pehrson

1843–1931

Residence: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen, 23 August 1890

Missionary labors: Stockholm Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 14 July 1892

Birth date: 10 September 1843

Birthplace: Bjurnäsegor, Västra Skedvi, Västmanland, Sweden

Father: Kraft, Peter Larsson

Mother: Andersdotter, Catherine

Spouse: Caesar, Karen

Marriage date: June 1866

Marriage place: Sweden

Spouse: Caesar, Marie Kristina

Marriage date: 1 May 1868

Marriage place: Västra Skedvi, Västmanland, Sweden

Death date: 4 March 1931

Death place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Burial place: Logan City Cemetery, Logan, Cache Co., Utah

When Lars was born, his father was a soldier in the Swedish military. He could have used his father’s soldier name of “Kraft” as his surname but decided to continue to use his true patronymic name of “Pehrsson” instead. Lars married Karen in 1866. After only eleven months of marriage, she died. He then married her sister, Marie. Both were baptized members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in July 1877 along with Lars’s parents.

In June 1880, they immigrated to America, arriving in Logan, Cache County, Utah on 27 July. They built a house on Third South Street, trying to accommodate their large family of nine children.

Lars accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1890. He arrived in Copenhagen on 23 August 1890 and was assigned to labor in the Stockholm Conference. After serving an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 14 July 1892. He accepted a second mission in 1904. His wife worked as a nurse and did housework and supported the family and sent her husband money during those times.

Lars died in 1931 at his home. He had been a Logan temple worker for a number of years (see “Lars Pehrson Dies at Age of 89 Years,” Deseret News, 3 March 1931). His wife Marie lived to be one hundred years old (see “Death Comes To Utah’s Fourth Oldest Person,” Deseret News, 26 December 1946).


Adam Lind Petersen

1870–1930

Residence: Huntsville, Weber Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 20 June 1892

Missionary labors: Copenhagen Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 3 May 1894

Departure ship: Milo

Birth date: 2 March 1870

Birthplace: Huntsville, Weber Co., Utah

Father: Petersen, Søren Lind

Mother: Nielsen, Anna (Maria Elizabeth)

Spouse: Petersen, Anna Matilda

Marriage date: 8 November 1888

Marriage place: Logan Temple, Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Death date: 29 March 1930

Death place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Burial place: Wasatch Lawn, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

In 1878, Adam was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints by Samuel S. Hammond. He was living in Huntsville, Weber County, Utah, when he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1892. He arrived in Copenhagen on 20 June 1892 and was assigned to labor in the Copenhagen Conference, part of the time as its president (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 3:485). After serving an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 3 May 1894 aboard the steamer Milo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 328–30, 337).

Adam served a second mission to Scandinavia from 1902 to 1904, this time as president of the Århus Conference (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 392, 394). Throughout his life, he served in various Church positions, including ward choir director, member of the stake Sunday School board, and president of the Scandinavian meetings in Weber County. In 1898, he accepted a YMMIA mission call to the San Juan Stake (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 3:485).

In 1907, he was ordained a high priest by David O. McKay and was called to serve on the Ogden Stake high council. In 1917, he served a short mission to the eastern states, principally in Washington DC (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 3:485).

As to secular work, Adam was a farmer, stock raiser, miner, merchandiser, and miller. He owned the first general store in Eden, Weber County. He served as justice of the peace in two precincts, one in Huntsville and the other in Eden. He served as the chief clerk of the House of Representatives in 1917 and as secretary of the Utah State Senate in 1919. For three months, he was a reading clerk in the U.S. Congress, a position not held before by a man from Utah. He also served as a special investigator for the State Board of Equalization beginning in 1919 (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 3:485).

Adam died in 1930 in the Salt Lake City Eleventh Ward boundary at age sixty (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 3:485).


Andrew Petersen

(Anders Pedersen)

1856–1938

Residence: Newton, Cache Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 18 September 1891

Missionary labors: Copenhagen Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 4 May 1893

Departure ship: Bravo

Birth date: 21 January 1856

Birthplace: Freersløv, Nørre Herlev, Frederiksborg, Denmark

Father: Christiansen, Peter (Peder)

Mother: Christiansdatter, Elizabeth

Spouse: Sørensen, Christina

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Petersen, Sarah Sophia

Marriage date: 30 August 1893

Marriage place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Death date: 21 September 1938

Death place: Newton, Cache Co., Utah

Burial place: Newton Cemetery, Newton, Cache Co., Utah

Andrew, whose father was a weaver, emigrated from Denmark to Logan, Cache County, Utah, when he was twenty-four years old. He later moved to Richmond, Cache County, and then to Newton, Cache County, in 1886. It was in Newton that he became prominent in business, merchandising, and farming (see “Andrew Peterson,” Deseret News, 22 September 1938).

In 1891, he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 18 September 1891 and was assigned to labor in the Copenhagen Conference. After completing this mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 4 May 1893 aboard the steamer Bravo bound for England (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 319, 321, 332). From England, he voyaged to America.

Returning to Newton, he once again operated a general merchandise store. However, in his later years his involvement in the store lessened due to his suffering from an extended illness. He died in 1938 in Newton at age eighty-two. His funeral was held in the Newton Ward meetinghouse (see “Andrew Peterson,” Deseret News, 22 September 1938).

Andrew F. Petersen

(Anders Pedersen)

1823–81

Residence: Lehi, Utah Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 26 June 1877

Missionary labors: Norway

Departure date from Copenhagen: 7 September 1878

Departure ship: Bravo

Birth date: 13 October 1823

Birthplace: Skuterud, Modum, Buskerud, Norway

Father: Andersen, Peter

Mother: Evansdatter, Anne

Spouse: Christenson, Hannah

Marriage date: 29 September 1869

Death date: 17 April 1881

Burial place: Lehi, Utah Co., Utah

Andrew immigrated to America to seek his fortune. He was converted to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie County, Iowa. He was baptized on 19 November 1849 by Torg Torstensen. The following year, he drove a team of oxen across the plains to California before settling in the Cottonwood area of Salt County, Utah (see Gardner, History of Lehi, 408).

During the threat of the Utah War, Andrew was assigned to ride his horse in the foothills of the Salt Lake Valley. After the threat passed, he moved to Lehi, Utah County. In this small community, he served in the Thirty-third Quorum of the Seventy until 1874 when he was ordained a high priest by Daniel S. Thomas (see Gardner, History of Lehi, Including a Biographical Section, 408).

In 1877, Andrew returned to Scandinavia as a missionary. He arrived in Copenhagen on 26 June 1877 and was assigned to labor in Norway. Due to poor health, he was released early from the mission. He departed from Copenhagen on 7 September 1878 aboard the steamer Bravo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 230–31, 233).

After returning to the States, he made adobe bricks that were used in the construction of homes in Lehi. He died in 1881 at age fifty-seven (see Van Wagoner, Lehi, Portraits of a Utah Town, 9).

Boye Peter Brother Petersen

(Boij Peter Broder Peterson)

1841–1912

Residence: Castle Dale, Emery Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 28 August 1889

Missionary labors: Århus Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 28 May 1891

Departure ship: Cameo

Birth date: 25 October 1841

Birthplace: Leck, Tønder, Schleswig-Holstein, Prussia, Germany

Father: Petersen, Momme

Mother: Laursen, Christiane Benedicte

Spouse: Plough, Mette Kjerstine Andersen

Marriage date: 23 June 1866

Marriage place: Domkirken-Ribe, Ribe, Denmark

Spouse: Pallesen, Marianne

Marriage date: 5 September 1888

Marriage place: Manti, Sanpete Co., Utah

Death date: 19 December 1912

Death place: Castle Dale, Emery Co., Utah

Burial place: Castle Dale, Emery Co., Utah

Boye was living in Castle Dale, Emery County, Utah, when he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 28 August 1889 and was assigned to labor in the Århus Conference. After serving an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 28 May 1891 aboard the steamer Cameo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 310–11, 318).

After living in Castle Dale for forty years, Boye died following a short illness at age seventy-one. His biographer wrote, “The town in general and the ward in particular lost one of their most faithful workers both in civic and religious work” (“Another Faithful Pioneer Called to the Other Side,” Sun Advocate, 26 December 1912).

Frands Peter Petersen

(Frants Peter Hansen)

1851–1900

Residence: Koosharem, Sevier Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 13 November 1888

Missionary labors: Århus Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 2 April 1891

Departure ship: Volo

Birth date: 19 October 1851

Birthplace: Vaarby, Hemmeshøj, Sorø, Denmark

Father: Pedersen, Hans

Mother: Frantsdatter, Maren

Spouse: Christensen, Inger Kjerstina (Kirstine)

Marriage date: 11 November 1872

Marriage date: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Christophersen (Christoffersen), Anna (Ane) Kathrine (Katrine) Louise

Marriage date: 19 October 1888

Marriage place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Death date: 24 May 1900

Death place: Colonia Diaz, Galeana, Chihuahua, Mexico

< lang="ES">Burial place:< lang="ES"> Colonia Diaz, Galeana, Chihuahua, Mexico

< lang="ES">

Due to his father being a prosperous architect, Frands received the best education available in Denmark before immigrating with his family to America. Unfortunately, his father died at sea. His mother, feeling sorry for emigrants, gave away the family fortune, leaving Frands and herself penniless (see Brown, “Biography of Frands Peter Petersen,” 8–9).

In exchange for a wagon and oxen in Nebraska, Frands taught children the basics of an education even though they were “bigger and meaner” than he was. After reaching the Salt Lake Valley, he and his mother settled in a dugout in Manti, Sanpete County. In the spring, rattlesnakes gathered near the mouth of their dugout. Frands had to kill the snakes before he could venture from the family dwelling (see Brown, “Biography of Frands Peter Petersen,” 8–9).

In 1872, he took his bride to the new settlement of Koosharem, Sevier County. In that community, they dug the cellar of their home first and lived there until they could build the rest of the house above ground level. A woman visiting Koosharem remarked, “You’d think it was resurrection day when the sun rose and the people came up out of the ground” (Brown, “Biography of Frands Peter Petersen,” 8).

Water for the new settlement was located in an Indian camp: “Frands spoke a little Ute and made arrangements for his family to haul water from the Indian village without trouble.” However, trouble with Indians did ensue. One day, an Indian chief came to the settlement with a baby in his arms. He said the child was dying and asked Frands to heal him. When the chief saw Frands’s infant son lying on a bed, he said that if his child died, Frands’s child would die, also. That night he and his family prayed fervently for the life of the Indian child. The next morning the chief came back with his baby in his arms and announced, “My papoose lives,” and walked away (see Brown, “Biography of Frands Peter Petersen,” 9–10).

Frands attended the October general conference of 1888. There he heard his name read from the pulpit as one who was called to leave on an immediate mission. He didn’t have time to go back home, so he sent word to his wife to send his clothes and their savings to him. But he did have time to marry a second wife before leaving on the mission. He never saw his first wife and their six children again (see correspondence from Ruby Bradfield, 17 September 1999).

Frands arrived in Copenhagen on 13 November 1888 and was assigned to labor in the Århus Conference (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 307). Most of his missionary labors were in Odense. There he taught extended relatives and gathered extensive genealogical information (see correspondence from Donna L. Hemingway). He served faithfully for two years and began to wonder why he was not released to return home from the mission. He was advised by Church leaders to stay on this mission until the furor over polygamy had died down. Frands remained another six months. He departed from Copenhagen on 2 April 1891 aboard the steamer Volo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 318).

After arriving in America, he traveled from New York City to El Paso, Texas, where his second wife met him. They then journeyed to Colonia Diaz, Galiana, Chihuahua, Mexico, in hopes of escaping penalties associated with polygamy. His first wife remained in Koosharem. He died in 1900 from appendicitis in Mexico at age forty-eight (see correspondence from Kay L. Lovell, 23 July 1999).


Hans Christian Petersen

(Hans Christian Nielsen)

1858–1940

Residence: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 4 May 1885

Missionary labors: Christiania Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 30 May 1887

Departure ship: Argo

Birth date: 7 July 1858

Birthplace: Vemmelev, Sorø, Denmark

Father: Nielsen, Peder

Mother: Larsdatter, Maren

Spouse: Rasmussen (Nielsen), Caroline Rasmine Matilda

Marriage date: 14 February 1878

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Nielsen, Caroline

Marriage date: 16 December 1885

Marriage place: Utah

Spouse: Melby, Borghild Thorstenson

Marriage date: 24 March 1920

Death date: 9 September 1940

Death place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Burial place: Logan City Cemetery, Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Sometime before Hans was born, his parent joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. In the Lutheran Church records, no infant baptism date is given for Hans. Rather, a note in the baptism column states, “Parents are Mormons.”

Hans, a resident of Logan, Cache County, Utah, accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1885. He arrived in Copenhagen on 4 May 1885 and was assigned to labor in the Christiania Conference. After serving faithfully for two years, he departed from Copenhagen on 30 May 1877 aboard the steamer Argo with 138 emigrating Latter-day Saints and 10 other returning missionaries (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 294–95, 302).

After this mission, he returned to Cache Valley, where he became a prominent lumber dealer. He interrupted his successful business to accept a second mission assignment to Norway. After completing this assignment, he served as a city councilmen for two terms, a board member of the West Cache Canal Company, and president of the Old Folks Central Committee. He worked as a farmer and a carpenter. He died after a lengthy illness in 1940 in his home in Logan at age eighty-two (see “Hans C. Peterson,” Deseret News, 10 September 1940).


James Petersen

(Jens Peder Pedersen)

1847–1929

Residence: South Jordan, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 28 August 1889

Missionary labors: Copenhagen and Ålborg Conferences

Departure date from Copenhagen: 23 July 1891

Departure ship: Volo

Birth date: 5 December 1847

Birthplace: Nyrup, Højby, Holbæk, Denmark

Father: Olsen, Peder

Mother: Pedersdatter, Dorthea

Spouse: Simmonsen, Mary Sophie

Marriage date: 26 December 1878

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 26 June 1929

Death place: South Jordan, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Burial place: South Jordan, Salt Lake Co., Utah

James received little formal schooling in Denmark. In his youth, he worked as a farmer and fisherman. At age fifteen, he hired out as a farmhand for four years (see Holt, “History of James Petersen,” 1).

On 2 February 1868, he was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. In June of that year, he and his family immigrated to America. The voyage was perilous aboard the Emerald Isle, owing mainly to contaminated drinking water that caused an outbreak of typhoid. More than fifty passengers died. Among those to succumb was James’s four-year-old brother. Although his mother became ill and was hospitalized when they reached New York City, she survived. James contracted typhoid but, being afraid of the hospital, avoided the doctors and authorities that would have taken him there. Because his mother had to remain in the hospital for nine weeks, James’s father decided to remain with her but told his two sons, James and Oley, to go west on their own (see Holt, “History of James Petersen,” 1).

They traveled as far as Omaha, Douglas County, Nebraska, accepting odd jobs to pay their way. Their parents joined them in Omaha. While the rest of family remained in Omaha for three years, James journeyed with the John G. Holman ox team company to the Salt Lake Valley. He walked nearly the entire distance, sleeping without bedding under the wagons at night. Along the way, he became ill from typhoid and was allowed to ride in a wagon for two days. He then had to walk again but was so weak that he often lagged as much as a mile behind the rest of the travelers. About fifty of his company died along the trail (see Holt, “History of James Petersen,” 1).

After arriving in the valley, James found employment with the Union Pacific Railroad in Weber Canyon. Later he worked as a miner in the Little Cottonwood Canyon. By 1871 he was self-employed and had acquired 120 acres in South Jordan (see Holt, “History of James Petersen,” 1). James was living in South Jordan when he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1889. He arrived in Copenhagen on 28 August 1889 and was assigned to labor in the Copenhagen Conference. During this mission, he presided over the Northwest and the Southwest Sjælland branches (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 199). At the close of an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 23 July 1891 aboard the Volo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 310, 313, 319).

Shortly after returning to Utah, he was called to be president of the Ninety-fifth Quorum of the Seventy. He served a second mission to the northern states from 1907 to 1908. He was given an honorable release due to illness in his family. Upon returning to Utah, he was called as a home missionary to the Jordan Stake for two years. He served for thirty-seven years as an acting teacher in the South Jordan Ward. He was a laborer on public works in the area (see Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, 1100).

In 1929, he died when an army truck hit his hay wagon and knocked him to the ground. It was reported that the driver of the truck was asleep at the time of the accident (see Holt, “History of James Petersen,” 2). James was eighty-two years old at his death.


Jens Peter Petersen

(Jens Peter Pedersen)

1850–1935

Residence: Moroni, Sanpete Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 28 October 1890

Missionary labors: Århus Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 14 May 1891

Departure ship: Volo

Birth date: 6 February 1850

Birthplace: Siim, Dover, Skanderborg, Denmark

Father: Knudsen, Peder

Mother: Pedersen, Anna Marie

Spouse: Jensen, Ane Sophie

Marriage date: 14 May 1870

Marriage place: Denmark

Spouse: Windous, Ellen Maria

Marriage date: 1874

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Lena

Death date: 3 November 1935

Death place: Moroni, Sanpete Co., Utah

Burial place: Moroni, Sanpete Co., Utah

Jens arrived in the Salt Lake Valley in 1873. While a resident of Moroni, Sanpete County, Utah, he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1890. He arrived in Copenhagen on 28 October 1890 and was assigned to serve in the Århus Conference. At the end of an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 14 May 1891 aboard the steamer Volo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 316–18).

He returned to Moroni, where he died at his home in 1935 from causes incident to age. He was eighty-five years old (see “Jens Peter Petersen,” Salt Lake Tribune, 3 November 1935).

John Peter Petersen

(Johan Peter Pedersen)

1842–1915

Residence: Spring City, Sanpete Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 2 June 1877

Missionary labors: Christiania Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 23 June 1879

Departure ship: Cato

Birth date: 3 January 1842

Birthplace: Russeløkbakken, Domkirken-Oslo, Oslo, Norway

Father: Pedersen, Michael

Mother: Johansdatter, Syverine

Spouse: Mortensen, Inger (Emma)

Marriage date: 7 March 1861

Marriage place: Mount Pleasant, Sanpete Co., Utah

Spouse: Jane C. Snow

Death date: 22 November 1915

Death place: Marysvale, Piute Co., Utah

Burial place: Annabella, Sevier Co., Utah

John was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on 15 April 1855. His mother, Syverine, had embraced the gospel a few months earlier on 23 December 1854. John emigrated a few years after his baptism since he is listed as marrying in Mount Pleasant, Sanpete County, Utah, in 1861.

John took an active role in the settlement of Sevier County, being one of the first pioneers to settle in Richfield. He was severely wounded in an Indian battle while attempting to defend the settlers. After the battle, he was employed as the first schoolteacher in the district (see “Indian War Veteran and Pioneer Settler Dies,” Deseret News, 29 November 1915).

He was living in Spring City, Sanpete County, when he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1877. He arrived in Copenhagen on 2 June 1877 and was assigned to labor in the Christiania Conference. After serving faithfully for two years, he departed from Copenhagen on 23 June 1879 aboard the steamer Cato (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 230–31, 240).

He returned to the States, where he served in the first bishopric of the Annabella Ward. He was released after the death of his wife. He then moved to Castle Valley, Grand County, and later to Marysville, Piute County. He died in 1915 in Marysville, Piute County, at age seventy-three. His body was brought to Annabella, Sevier County, so that he could be buried at the side of his first wife, who had died thirty years before (see “Indian War Veteran and Pioneer Settler Dies,” Deseret News, 29 November 1915).


Knud Petersen

1842–1912

Residence: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 29 November 1873

Missionary labors: Copenhagen Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 22 June 1876

Departure ship: Otto

Birth date: 17 December 1842

Birthplace: Arentzdal, Vor Frue-Odense, Odense, Denmark

Father: Knudsen, Peter

Mother: Larsdatter, Johanne Marie

Spouse: Svendsen, Elvine

Marriage date: 10 October 1876

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 3 November 1912

Death place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Knud joined the Church in Denmark and emigrated from there on 10 May 1862. On the journey to Zion, Knud was responsible for a group of converts, whom he led safely to Salt Lake City (see “Knud Petersen,” 1). One member of the group wrote that he was “a wise leader and captain for the company” and that his oxen were the fattest that had ever crossed the plains. Knud’s leadership pattern was to move quickly across the barren lands, then slow down or even stop for a day or two when the group reached good grazing lands (see Carter, Our Pioneer Heritage, 10:133).

In 1865, Knud was one of the first settlers in the Cache Valley, having claimed five acres in Logan. On this land, he grew grain and raised cattle, and built irrigation canals (see “Knud Petersen,” 1).

He accepted a mission call to his native land in 1873. He arrived in Copenhagen on 29 November 1873 and was assigned to be president of the Copenhagen Conference (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 215–17). During this assignment, Knud found his father “and he spent many an evening telling him of the wonders of the new world.” He made many converts, among them “a saucy, bright-eyed girl of 16,” who later became his wife (“Knud Petersen,” 1). At the close of an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 22 June 1876 aboard the steamer Otto (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 225). He died in 1912 in Logan at age sixty-nine.

Lorentz Petersen

1857–1942

Residence: Hyrum, Cache Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 30 April 1889

Missionary labors: Copenhagen and Ålborg Conferences

Departure date from Copenhagen: 2 April 1891

Departure ship: Volo

Birth date: 18 February 1857

Birthplace: Valdby, Valby, Frederiksborg, Denmark

Father: Pedersen, Hans

Mother: Lorentzdatter, Ane Margretha Dorothea

Spouse: Nielsen, Kirstine

Marriage date: 7 June 1876

Marriage place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Death date: 6 April 1942

Death place: Hyrum, Cache Co., Utah

Burial place: Hyrum, Cache Co., Utah

Lorentz’s mother was the daughter of King Frederick VI of Denmark. Until he was six, he lived the life of a young aristocrat; he was well educated and able to speak many languages. When he was six years old, his mother listened to the message of Latter-day Saint missionaries and joined the Church. His father, Hans Pedersen, although reluctant, joined the Church some time later (see Gustaveson, “A Brief Sketch of the Life of Lorentz Petersen,” 1).

His mother was eager to unite with the Saints in Zion, but his father was unwilling to leave their beautiful farm and other possessions. In 1863, his heart softened, and the family made plans to emigrate. They sold their holdings and left Denmark, paying the passage for forty other immigrants. They crossed the Atlantic Ocean on the John J. Boyd steamer (see Gustaveson, “A Brief Sketch of the Life of Lorentz Petersen,” 1–2).

Upon arriving in the Salt Lake Valley, the family gave two of their three wagons, filled with goods, to Brigham Young. President Young then called them to settle in Hyrum, a new settlement in Cache Valley. Life in Hyrum was nothing like the luxury they had left behind. Settlers were discouraged, battling poor crop yields, grasshoppers, and hostile Indians for three years. Despite the difficulties facing them, the Petersens bought twenty acres of land for a dollar and built a cabin. The next spring, Hans bought cattle, began farming, and prospered—so much so that the bishop “chastised him for his materialism” (Gustaveson, “A Brief Sketch of the Life of Lorentz Petersen,” 2).

When Lorentz was twelve years old, his father hired him out to neighboring farmers to teach him the value of hard work. About this time, his parents divorced. His father went back to Denmark. He returned to Hyrum with a new wife and lived next door to his first family. It appears everyone got along well, but now Lorentz and his older brother were expected to financially help their mother. With what they earned logging, they were able to build a home for her (see Gustaveson, “A Brief Sketch of the Life of Lorentz Petersen,” 2–3).

At age nineteen, Lorentz was a “most eligible bachelor because he had enough lumber to build a house.” He met a seventeen-year-old Danish girl named Kirstine Nielsen, and they were soon married by a local judge. A few years after he married, Lorentz learned to play the cornet and became the leader of the town band. At one point, he contracted typhoid fever. In an effort to cheer him up, the band played for him. The loud noise, instead of cheering him, caused a relapse. His grandson notes that this was a case of his nearly being “killed with kindness” (Gustaveson, “A Brief Sketch of the Life of Lorentz Petersen,” 3–4).

Lorentz recovered and served a home mission. By the time he and Kirstine had five children, he was called on a mission to Denmark. Although it was a financial hardship, he left his family to manage the best they could. For this occasion, Lorentz purchased his first store-bought suit (see Gustaveson, “A Brief Sketch of the Life of Lorentz Petersen,” 4). He arrived in Copenhagen on 30 April 1889 and was assigned to labor in the Copenhagen Conference and later the Ålborg Conference. The first year of his mission, his children contracted scarlet fever. The second year, they suffered from diphtheria. Fortunately, all survived. After serving for two years, Lorentz departed from Copenhagen on 2 April 1891 aboard the steamer Volo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 310–11, 313, 318).

After returning home, he was ordained a high priest and served as a bishop’s counselor in the Hyrum Second Ward. At the same time, he also served a home mission. For thirty-six years, Lorentz was an officiator in the Logan Temple. During these years, he contracted Rocky Mountain spotted fever but overcame it with treatment, the first medical treatment of his life (see Gustaveson, “A Brief Sketch of the Life of Lorentz Petersen,” 5).

In 1906, he returned to Denmark as president of the Copenhagen Conference (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 415, 495). At age seventy-two, he served a third mission—this time in San Jose, California. During this mission, he caught a bad cold which developed into asthma. He suffered from this illness for twelve years. The last years of his life were spent seated in a chair in the kitchen. Despite his handicap, “before he died he said that he was happy with life and basically he would have lived it no other way.” He died in 1942 in Hyrum at age eighty-five (see Gustaveson, “A Brief Sketch of the Life of Lorentz Petersen,” 5–6).


Niels W. Petersen

(Niels Pedersen)

1846–1926

Residence: Bloomington, Bear Lake Co., Idaho

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 5 June 1883

Missionary labors: Copenhagen Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 2 April 1885

Departure ship: Milo

Birth date: 22 April 1846

Birthplace: Systofte, Maribo, Denmark

Father: Pedersen, Ole

Mother: Olsdatter, Anna

Spouse: Sørensen, Margret

Marriage date: 20 October 1867

Spouse: Bee, Joanna

Marriage date: 26 October 1886

Marriage place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Death date: 3 August 1926

Death place: Salem, Madison Co., Idaho

Burial place: Bloomington, Bear Lake Co., Idaho

Niels joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Denmark and immigrated with his family to America. They arrived on 1 October 1862 in the Salt Lake Valley. From the valley, they moved to Bloomington, Bear Lake County, Idaho (see Matthews, History of Bear Lake Pioneers, 586).

Niels accepted a mission call to Denmark in 1883. He arrived in Copenhagen on 5 June 1883 and was assigned to labor in the Copenhagen Conference. After completing an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 2 April 1885 aboard the steamer Milo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 274–75, 289).

Returning to Bloomington, he labored as a farmer and carpenter to support his family. He also served in various capacities within the Church after being ordained a seventy and a high priest. He died in 1926 at the home of his daughter in Salem, Madison County, Idaho, at age eighty (see Matthews, History of Bear Lake Pioneers, 586).


Ole Petersen (Pedersen)

(Ole Rasmussen)

1863–1928

Residence: Bennington, Bear Lake Co., Idaho

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 4 May 1888

Missionary labors: Stockholm Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 24 April 1890

Departure ship: Cameo

Birth date: 14 March 1863

Birthplace: Tiustrup, Tystrup, Sorø, Denmark

Father: Pedersen, Rasmus

Mother: Christiansdatter, Ane Kirstine

Spouse: Nielsen, Sophia

Marriage date: 25 May 1887

Marriage place: Logan Temple, Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Death date: 27 December 1928

Death place: Fielding, Box Elder Co., Utah

Burial place: Fielding, Box Elder Co., Utah

Ole was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in 1874 (see Goodey, “Petersen History,” 1). Two years later, he and his family immigrated to Utah and located in Manti, Sanpete County. In that community, Ole received an elementary education. Although his schooling was limited, he had a great thirst for knowledge. He is remembered by his posterity for his poetry, record-keeping, and exceptional penmanship (see Ravsten, History of Clarkston: The Granary of Cache Valley, 1864–1964, 387–88).

After his marriage to Sophia Nielsen, Ole and his bride located in Clarkston, Cache County, Utah. A year later he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. Sophia was quite ill at that time. Some of their neighbors remarked that she wouldn’t live to see him return from the mission (see Goodey, “Petersen History,” 1). In spite of their comments, Ole arrived in Copenhagen on 4 May 1888 and was assigned to labor in the Stockholm Conference (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 313). In the meantime, Sophia grew stronger. She soon became well enough to work (see Goodey, “Petersen History,” 1).

On the mission, Ole was arrested as a spy because he didn’t have nationalization papers. Feeling “very discouraged” after his arrest, he found solace in the hymn “How Firm a Foundation” and his patriarchal blessing, which stated that he would be “a swift messenger to the Nations of the earth to preach the gospel, and gather the honest.” After seeing this promise fulfilled, Ole departed from Copenhagen on 24 April 1890 aboard the steamer Cameo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 313; Goodey, “Petersen History,” 2).

Upon returning to Clarkston, he served as a ward clerk of Clarkston for four years. He was ordained a high priest on 22 June 1902 by Alma Merrill. After the ordination, he was called to be a counselor in the local bishopric (see Ravsten, History of Clarkston: The Granary of Cache Valley, 1864–1964, 387–88).

Throughout his life, Ole served the Church in many capacities—including Sunday School teacher and genealogical board member of his ward and stake. During that time, he wrote an unpublished history of his father, Rasmus Petersen. To write the biography, he awakened at 5 a.m. to do his studying and genealogical work. During these early morning hours, he also wrote a poem to his wife:

Then if faithful we’ll be given

Robes of righteousness and truth

And eternal life in heaven

And be like as in our youth.

He homesteaded a farm outside of Clarkston, Cache County, Utah, for a few years. Although he and his wife had several children, the family lived in a one-room home until his oldest daughter was about to attend school. The family moved closer to town and Ole secured a job hauling milk. He left his home every morning at 5 a.m. and sometimes didn’t return until 10 p.m. In the winter, when Ole hauled milk from Clarkston to Newton and Smithfield, his beard would freeze. He joked with his children that he was Santa Claus (see Goodey, “Petersen History,” 3).

The children remember him as a devout man who lived by his faith. His faith and devotion to his family are clearly shown in the following story. In 1907, Ole prayed fervently that the Lord would guide him to a place where he could better provide for his family. It was not long before he met a man from Fielding, Box Elder County, who sold him a house and farm there (see Goodey, “Petersen History,” 4).

His daughters recalled that the strongest language he ever used was to call someone a “long-headed fool.” His daughter, Lovinnie, recalled that he once gave her a stern lecture because she had used the expression, “‘Oh, my Heavens.’ He told me what the Savior said in the Bible about that and I never said Heavens again in all my life” (Peterson, “Our Family,” 1). Milton H. Welling said of him, “I have never seen a man so intolerant of sin, yet so tolerant of sinners” (Ravsten, History of Clarkston: The Granary of Cache Valley, 1864–1964, 389). He was a strict tithe payer, even when money was tight (see Goodey, “Petersen History,” 3).

On 23 March 1919, he was ordained a bishop by George Albert Smith. He served as bishop of the Fielding Ward from 1918 to 1922. He died in 1928 in Fielding at age sixty-five (see Goodey, “Petersen History,” 3).


Peter Waldermar Petersen

(Peter Morten Waldemar Petersen)

1861–1935

Residence: Smithfield, Cache Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 2 November 1884

Missionary labors: Copenhagen Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 8 April 1886

Departure ship: Bravo

Birth date: 8 February 1861

Birthplace: Tvergade 47, St. Paul’s-Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark

Father: Petersen, Hans

Mother: Mortensen, Ane Marie

Spouse: Jensen, Christine Josephine

Marriage date: 22 October 1886

Marriage place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Death date: 21 December 1935

Death place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Burial place: Smithfield Cemetery, Smithfield, Cache Co., Utah

When Peter’s father joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, his parents divorced (see correspondence from Dottie Casperson). According to another source, however, Peter’s mother died on 18 April 1862, eleven days after giving birth to Peter’s younger sister, Marie Sophie. Father and son immigrated to America in 1870, possibly on the ship Minnesota. They eventually settled in Cache County, Utah (see correspondence from Elma J. Smout Anderson, 23 July 1999).

In that county, Peter worked as a farmer and a shoemaker until 1884, when he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 2 November 1884 and was assigned to labor in the Copenhagen Conference. On this mission, he learned that his sister had drowned (see correspondence from Dottie Casperson). After serving an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 8 April 1886 aboard the steamer Bravo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 282–83, 296).

Returning to Utah, Peter suffered from poor health due to a heart ailment. He moved to Salt Lake City in 1929. He died from exposure in 1935 in Salt Lake City at age seventy-four. His funeral service was conducted in the Smithfield Third Ward chapel (see correspondence from Elma J. Smout Anderson, 23 July 1999).


Soren Christian Petersen

(Søren Christian Petersen)

1821–95

Residence: Elsinore, Sevier Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 1 September 1881

Missionary labors: Ålborg Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 15 June 1883

Departure ship: Pacific (Milo)

Birth date: 13 June 1821

Birthplace: Dvergetved, Tolne, Hjørring, Denmark

Father: Pedersen, Peder

Mother: Christensdatter, Cecelia (Sidsel) Marie

Spouse: Larsen, Mette Marie

Marriage date: 3 November 1843

Marriage place: Hjørring, Hjørring, Denmark

Spouse: Larsen, Else Marie

Marriage date: 22 October 1861

Marriage place: Hjørring, Hjørring, Denmark

Spouse: Petersen, Karen Marie

Marriage date: 23 October 1871

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 1 October 1895

Death place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Burial place: Logan Cemetery, Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Soren emigrated from Denmark to America in 1863. He crossed the plains with the William B. Preston pioneer company and arrived on 10 September 1863 in the Salt Lake Valley (see Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, 1101).

He was living in Elsinore, Sevier County, Utah, when he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 1 September 1881 and was assigned to labor in the Ålborg Conference. After serving faithfully for two years, he departed from Copenhagen on 15 June 1883 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 262–63, 269, 496).

Twelve years later, Soren accepted a second mission call to Scandinavia. From 1895 to 1896, he served as president of the Ålborg Conference (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 262–63, 269, 496).

Upon returning to Utah, he faced many difficulties. On 7 March 1887, he was sentenced to six months’ imprisonment for unlawful cohabitation. He was discharged on 6 August 1887 (see Jenson, LDS Church Chronology, March 7, 1887). After his discharge, he returned to Elsinore. In that community, he supported his families as a stock raiser and farmer. Before his death in 1895 in Logan, Cache County, he was ordained a high priest (see Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, 1101). He died at age seventy-four.


Soren Lind Petersen

(Søren Pedersen)

1835–1901

Residence: Huntsville, Weber Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 22 November 1874

Missionary labors: Christiania Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 8 September 1876

Departure ship: Cameo

Birth date: 20 February 1835

Birthplace: Faistrup, Lading, Århus, Denmark

Father: Johnsen, Peder

Mother: Lind, Karen Jensen

Spouse: Nielson, Anne Elizabeth (Anna Maria)

Marriage date: 8 May 1863

Marriage place: aboard ship

Spouse: Loftgreen, Kjestie (Katie)

Marriage date: December 1869

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Petersen (Franks), Ella Louise

Marriage date: 20 October 1876

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 25 November 1901

Death place: Huntsville, Weber Co., Utah

Burial place: Huntsville, Weber Co., Utah

On 28 April 1860, Soren was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He was ordained an elder two months later. He was then called to preside over the Århus Branch (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 201).

After immigrating to America in 1861, he crossed the plains in the W. W. Cluff pioneer company. For a brief season, he lived in Salt Lake City before settling in Huntsville, Weber County. He was given responsibility for encouraging other Scandinavians to settle in Huntsville. In the small community, Soren served as the manager of the co-op from 1867 to 1874 (see correspondence from Eva P. Hardy).

In 1874, he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 22 November 1874 and was assigned to be president of the Christiania Conference (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 201). At the close of an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 8 September 1876 aboard the steamer Cameo with a new wife and child (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 220, 225). This unexpected marriage caused much family contention upon his return to the States. He supported his families by making shoes and wholesaling meat (see correspondence from Stephen E. Whitesides).

On 7 March 1886, Soren was arrested at Ogden, and he gave bonds in the sum of two thousand dollars. In the Fourth District Court in Ogden, his case was dismissed on the recommendation of the U. S. attorney who said that the evidence in these his case was insufficient (see Jenson, LDS Church Chronology, 7 March 1886; correspondence from Stephen E. Whitesides). He served as a president of the Seventy-fifth Quorum of the Seventy. He also served as a first counselor in the local bishopric and was a stockholder in the First National Bank (see correspondence from Eva P. Hardy). Soren died in 1901 in Huntsville at age sixty-six.


Waldemar Henrick Petersen

(Heinrich Waldemar Petersen)

1848–1905

Residence: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 6 May 1884

Missionary labors: Copenhagen Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 9 June 1884

Departure ship: Milo

Birth date: 17 April 1848

Birthplace: Amaliegaden #139, Garnisons-Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark

Father: Petersen, Peter

Mother: Bertelsdatter Madsen, Berthe Johanne

Spouse: Hailstone, Elizabeth

Marriage date: 13 February 1871

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 26 December 1905

Death place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Burial place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Waldemar’s mother died of cholera when he was four years old. Although her death marred his childhood, he did complete his formal education before being apprenticed to a butcher. At age seventeen, he and his stepbrother, Fred, departed from Copenhagen bound for America. After arriving in America, they traversed the plains to reach the Salt Lake Valley. Upon arriving in Zion, Waldemar had only forty cents. To increase his economic holdings, he worked for the Hailstone family. By 1869, he had earned enough money to bring his father and stepmother to Utah. Sadly, they contracted malaria on the journey and lived only six weeks after arriving in the Salt Lake Valley (see “Waldemar Henrick Petersen,” 1).

Waldemar married Elizabeth Hailstone soon after his parents’ demise. The young couple lived for a time on the back porch of the Hailstone’s boarding house. They owned only a table, two chairs, and a chest of drawers. Sometime later, fortune changed, and they were able to purchase land from Elizabeth’s father and build a home with two rooms and a summer kitchen (see “Waldemar Henrick Petersen,” 2).

Waldemar also opened a butcher shop on credit. Within a month, he had paid off his loan and had five hundred dollars in the bank. It was estimated that he made two hundred dollars a month, a considerable sum at that time (see “Waldemar Henrick Petersen,” 2–3).

Brigham Young called Waldemar and his family to settle in the “muddies” on the Virgin River. His father-in-law convinced him not to go. Waldemar paid one thousand dollars to another man to take his place in the Muddy (see “Waldemar Henrick Petersen,” 3).

In 1877, he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 27 November 1877 and was assigned to labor in the Copenhagen Conference (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 230–31). After serving six months, he became ill and was sent to the states to recover. After recuperating in New York, he returned to Denmark and finished his mission (see “Waldemar Henrick Petersen,” 3).

Eight years later, Waldemar returned to Denmark to serve another mission. He arrived in Copenhagen on 6 May 1884 and was assigned to labor in the Copenhagen Conference. This time he became so ill that he left early and never returned. He departed from Copenhagen on 9 June 1884 aboard the steamer Milo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 279, 282–83).

Waldemar and his family resided in the Salt Lake City Fifteenth Ward. He supported his loved ones by delivering meats and groceries throughout the community. He died from cancer of the spleen in 1905 in Salt Lake City at age fifty-seven (see “Waldemar Henrick Petersen,” 3).


Andreas Peterson

(Andreas Pärsson)

1849–1928

Residence: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 6 November 1882

Missionary labors: Stockholm Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 17 October 1884

Departure ship: Bravo

Birth date: 23 July 1849

Birthplace: Åsneybyn, Håbol, Älvsborg, Sweden

Father: Jansson, Pär

Mother: Jansdotter, Christina

Spouse: Overn, Inga Caroline Sophia

Marriage date: 25 July 1878

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 19 December 1928

Death place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Burial place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

In 1871, Andreas moved with his well-to-do parents from Sweden to Norway. In Norway, he heard the gospel message of the Latter-day Saint missionaries and was baptized on 25 May 1872 by Niles Isaksen. In 1873, he was called on his first mission and labored for two years in the Stavanger (Rogäland County) and two years in the Drammen (Buskerud County) branches. He traveled thousands of miles and held hundreds of meetings during the four years. He also baptized over sixty converts (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 3:690).

Andreas had his share of opposition as a local missionary: “Among others, Andreas was imprisoned in Drammen on 20 February 1876, for baptizing and administering the Sacrament the year before” (Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 224). In 1877, he baptized his mother before immigrating to America.

He settled in Spring City, Sanpete County, Utah, before locating in Logan, Cache County, in 1878 (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 3:691). While living in Logan, he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1882. He arrived in Copenhagen on 6 November 1882 and was assigned to labor as a traveling elder in the Stockholm Conference. He walked 3,208 miles, held 190 Church meetings, and baptized 42 converts on this mission (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 3:691). After serving faithfully for two years, he was honorably released and boarded the steamer Bravo in Copenhagen on 17 October 1884. He kept a journal of the voyage home. One entry noted that the prayers of the faithful calmed a storm: “On Saturday, Oct. 25th, we were exposed to a very strong wind. The storm increased during the day and the night was still worse. About 12 o’clock midnight, six of the missionaries arose and united in prayer, asking the Lord to quiet the elements. Our prayers were answered, for the weather on Sunday morning was much better and we praised the Lord” (Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 267, 269, 279–80).

After returning home, Andreas served for three years as president of an elders quorum. He was ordained a high priest in 1897 and called to serve on the stake high council. For nine years, he served as superintendent of his ward Sunday School. Like many of his contemporaries, Andreas also served in the public sector. He was elected to the Logan city council and to the Logan school board (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 3:691).

In 1898, Andreas again accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 9 September 1898 and was assigned to be president of the Scandinavian Mission. For nearly three years, he traveled throughout Denmark, Sweden, and Norway sharing the gospel and encouraging fellow missionaries. During his travels, he broke new ground: “In Gillivara, some thirty miles beyond the polar circle, he held a public meeting attended by about two hundred people, which was the first meeting ever held by a ‘Mormon’ Elder in that part of the world” (Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 3:691). Another account adds further details of this meeting: “In July, 1900, Pres. Andreas Peterson visited the northern provinces of Sweden, going as far north as Gellivare, Lappland. . . . He held a well-attended meeting . . . and, being the only missionary, it became his privilege to sing, pray and preach. After the meeting he received several invitations to visit the people. During his ten days’ trip to that part of Sweden, he held ten meetings” (Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 378–79).

Later that same year, he spoke to nearly four hundred people in Copenhagen, explaining the “economic and religious conditions in Utah, the training of children, and the Word of Wisdom as revealed to the Prophet Joseph Smith.” This lecture was so well-received that he was asked to deliver it again to other groups. Biographer Andrew Jenson wrote that “his administration had throughout been crowned with success” (Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 279, 386). After his release from the mission on 27 April 1901, Andreas traveled widely throughout the Middle East and Europe (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 3:690).

In 1910, Andreas received a third mission call to Scandinavia. This time he was to be president of the Swedish Mission. On 28 February 1911, he had an audience with King Gustav V of Sweden, in which he tried to persuade the king to stop banishing the missionaries. The king received him courteously and promised to read the literature he left, even hinting that he might change his views on Latter-day Saint doctrine. But it appears that no change occurred. Andreas again appealed to the Swedish government: “The claim having been made that Utah missionaries in Sweden were acting as secret emigrant agents and therefore ought to be expelled from the country, Elder Andreas Peterson and Einar Johanson sent a communication . . . to the civil department of the Swedish government denying the allegations mentioned and showing the true character and movements of the missionaries of the Church” (Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 459).

Besides these two appeals, he visited various conferences and branches in Sweden. He also traveled to St. Petersburg and Finland. All told, he traveled 34,625 miles and attended 500 meetings before being released in October 1912 (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 3:691).

After his third mission, Andreas became an ordinance worker in the Logan Temple. His biographer sums up his lifetime of service by stating that he was “a man of ability, a good speaker, a devoted Latter-day Saint and a good citizen,” as well as “the head of an extensive and successful boot and shoe business in Logan” (Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 3:691). He died in 1928 in Logan at age seventy-nine.


Frederik Peterson

1848–93

Residence: Grantsville, Tooele Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 5 November 1881

Missionary labors: Göteborg Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 24 August 1883

Departure ship: Bravo

Birth date: 2 January 1848

Birthplace: Ingarydsvad, Brevik, Skaraborg, Sweden

Father: Petterson, Petter

Mother: Dedereksdotter, Fredrica

Spouse: Johnson, Anna Sophia

Marriage date: 11 December 1871

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 14 September 1893

Death place: Hyrum, Cache Co., Utah

Burial place: Hyrum Cemetery, Hyrum, Cache Co., Utah

On 10 July 1862, Frederik was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. By April 1862, he and his parents had begun immigrating to America. After arriving in the United States, they crossed the plains with an ox team company to reach the Salt Lake Valley. They first settled in Sanpete County before moving to Grantsville, Tooele County, in 1866. While a resident of that community, Frederik fought in the Black Hawk War (see Shaffer, “Life History of Frederick Peterson,” 1).

He accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1881. He arrived in Copenhagen on 5 November 1881 and was assigned to labor in the Göteborg Conference. During the mission, he kept diary accounts of his spiritual experiences which included administering to the sick and witnessing the healing of the sick. At the close of an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 24

August 1883 aboard the steamer Bravo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 262, 264, 270).

He returned to Utah, where he became a successful farmer. Unfortunately, he suffered a severe injury when his foot was caught in a haybaler. After three operations, in which portions of his foot were amputated, he died in 1893 in Hyrum, Cache County, at age forty-five (see Shaffer, “Life History of Frederick Peterson,” 1).

James Christian Peterson

(Jens Kristian Pedersen)

1846–1926

Residence: Fillmore, Millard Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 4 May 1885

Missionary labors: Christiania Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 30 May 1887

Departure ship: Argo

Birth date: 16 May 1846

Birthplace: Nørre Mark, Tommerup, Odense, Denmark

Father: Hansen, Peter

Mother: Jørgehnsdatter, Oline Elizabeth

Spouse: Tonseth, Anna Elizabeth

Marriage date: 17 August 1887

Death date: 27 March 1926

Death place: Fillmore, Millard Co., Utah

Burial place: Fillmore City Cemetery, Fillmore, Millard Co., Utah

In 1865, James was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. One year later, he immigrated to America. He crossed the plains with the George Q. Cannon company. By the time he reached the Salt Lake Valley, his parents were residing in Fillmore, Millard County, Utah. He soon joined them in the community and worked alongside his father in the freighting business during the winter months and in the farming business the rest of the year (see Blohm, “Brief History of My Grandfather, Peder Hansen,” 3).

He accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1885. He arrived in Copenhagen on 4 May 1885 and was assigned to labor in the Christiania Conference. On this mission, he baptized Anna Tonseth, his future bride. At the close of an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 30 May 1887 aboard the steamer Argo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 293, 295, 302).

After returning to Fillmore, he held responsible positions within the Church and the community. He was a city councilman for fourteen years and a precinct constable. His biographer wrote of him, “He served a full and honorable life.” He died in 1926 at his home in Fillmore, having lingered for twelve days after suffering a stroke. He was seventy-nine years old. His funeral services were held in the local meetinghouse (see “James Peterson Called by Death,” The Progress, 1 April 1926).

Lars Knut Peterson

(Lars Knutsson)

1856–1934

Residence: Huntsville, Weber Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 30 April 1889

Missionary labors: Skåne Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 16 April 1891

Departure ship: Cameo

Birth date: 27 January 1856

Birthplace: Slimminge, Malmöhus, Sweden

Father: Larsson, Knut

Mother: Jönsdotter Holmquist, Cecilia

Spouse: Nilsson, Anna Kristina

Marriage date: 3 November, 1881

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 21 April 1934

Death place: Huntsville, Weber Co., Utah

Burial place: Huntsville, Weber Co., Utah

When Lars was born, his mother had not yet married Bent Petersson. The Latter-day Saint branch records reflect his true patronymic surname of “Knutsson,” which he incorporated as part of his name in America. On 18 October 1874, Lars was baptized a member of the Church in Rögla (Skårby, Malmöhus), Sweden. He immigrated to America in 1876, following his mother and younger siblings, who had crossed the ocean in 1872. He settled in Huntsville, Weber County, Utah, and lived there the rest of his life.

Lars was primarily a farmer. He also served for fifty years as the water commissioner of Ogden valley. While residing in Huntsville, Lars accepted a call to return to his native land to preach the gospel. He arrived in Copenhagen on 30 April 1889 and was assigned to labor in the Skåne Conference. Lars and five other returning missionaries were accompanied by fifty-nine emigrating Saints on their journey home which took place on 16 April 1891.

When Lars was age seventy-eight, he suffered a paralytic stroke and died a few days later on 21 April 1934 at his home in Huntsville. He was survived by his wife and seven sons.


Niels Morten Peterson

(Niels Mortensen)

1819–1903

Residence: Richfield, Sevier Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 10 June 1876

Missionary labors: Christiania and Ålborg Conferences

Departure date from Copenhagen: 24 June 1878

Departure ship: Cameo

Birth date: 12 November 1819

Birthplace: Lilla Skarpholt, Albæk, Hjørring, Denmark

Father: Pedersen, Morten

Mother: Christensdatter, Kjersten

Spouse: Christensen, Mette Christine

Marriage date: 22 February 1850

Marriage place: Albæk, Hjørring, Denmark

Spouse: Larsen, Johanna Katrine

Marriage date: 16 November 1874

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 14 January 1903

Death place: Richfield, Sevier Co., Utah

Burial place: Richfield, Sevier Co., Utah

Niels excelled in brickmaking, bridge building, and farming. His abilities were known by government officials, who issued him contracts to build highways. He accumulated much wealth through these building ventures in Denmark (see Pioneer Pathways: Pioneers of Sanpete County, 46).

His interest in wealth turned to religion in 1858. He was baptized on 24 October 1858 by A. P. Fjeldsted. Soon after his baptism, he was ordained to the priesthood and called to serve a local mission. For several years, he presided over the Voer Branch (Hjørring County) and generously assisted branch members with their temporal needs (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 2:690).

Niels immigrated to America in 1862, paying the way of his family and the passage of many poor Latter-day Saints. Arriving in Utah, he settled in Pleasant Grove, Utah County, and then Ephraim, Sanpete County, and finally in 1865 to Richfield, Sevier County. He surveyed the Richfield Irrigation Canal and most of the canals in the Sevier Valley. He was the county surveyor of Sevier County, before accepting a mission call to Scandinavia in 1876 (see Pioneer Pathways: Pioneers of Sanpete County, 46).

Niels arrived in Copenhagen on 10 June 1876. From 1876 to 1877, he served as president of the Christiania Conference. From 1877 to 1878, he was president of the Ålborg Conference. After completing these missionary assignments, he departed from Copenhagen on 24 June 1878 aboard the steamer Cameo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 496, 507).

After returning to Sevier County, he was called to serve on the high council in the Sevier Stake. For many years, he presided over the Scandinavian meetings in Richfield. Niels is remembered as a “heavily built man noted for his extraordinary strength in his younger days.” His children remembered him as a patient and kind man but very stern. Niels died in 1903 in Richfield at age eighty-three. He was buried five days later. The reason for the extended days before burial was that he requested that his body not be buried until they were sure that he had passed away (see Pioneer Pathways: Pioneers of Sanpete County, 49).


Niels Peter Peterson

(Niels Peter Larsen)

1858–1945

Residence: Pleasant Grove, Utah Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 6 November 1882

Missionary labors: Ålborg Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 9 June 1884

Departure ship: Argo

Birth date: 9 May 1858

Birthplace: Favrholt, Albæk, Hjørring, Denmark

Father: Christensen, Laurs Peter

Mother: Jensdatter, Elsie Maria

Spouse: Johnson, Augusta

Marriage date: 21 April 1886

Marriage place: Logan Temple, Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Death date: 24 November 1945

Death place: Richfield, Sevier Co., Utah

Burial place: Richfield, Sevier Co., Utah

In 1857, Niels’s mother joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Four years later, his father also joined. In 1862, Niels and his family immigrated to America. Sadly, three children in the family died on the journey. The remaining family members settled in Pleasant Grove, Utah County, Utah, where his mother and baby sister died (see Peterson, “A Short Sketch of My Life,” 1–3).

His father remarried. Niels’s stepmother taught him to read the New Testament. “I would read one chapter in the forenoon and one in the afternoon, and sometimes an extra one or two for punishment; but I became a good reader without learning my alphabet,” he recalled. “This proved of great worth to me in later years when I was sent on a mission” (Peterson, “A Short Sketch of My Life,” 3).

In spring 1864, his family moved to Richfield, Sevier County. One day while Niels was herding sheep north of the community, Indians killed three men. Fearing for their own lives, his family moved to Ephraim, Sanpete County. There, Niels was baptized in the Ephraim Creek. He attended school when he could. At school he learned the importance of keeping a journal. Throughout his life, he kept a daily journal. In the summer months, Niels became an expert fisherman. He could catch from thirty to eighty chubs in a day—”these kept the family and some of the neighbors in fish” (Peterson, “A Short Sketch of My Life,” 4).

In 1871, he and his family returned to Richfield. In the community, Niels herded sheep. From money earned shepherding, he bought a few cattle that he traded for ten acres of farmland from his brother, plus “a pair of mules and an old harness.” Later he purchased a wagon, which he used to carry freight to the miners in western Utah and Nevada (see Peterson, “A Short Sketch of My Life,” 5).

In spring 1874, Richfield joined the United Order. From 1875 to 1877, Niels farmed, freighted, and did other jobs for the Order. In 1882, he began to build a rock house. He had built only a portion of the walls when he received a mission call to Scandinavia. He left the house unfinished and although he had no money and some debt, he sold what he could and departed from the states, bound for Copenhagen (see Peterson, “A Short Sketch of My Life,” 5–6).

He arrived in Copenhagen on 6 November 1882 and was assigned to labor in the Ålborg Conference. On this mission, he visited his birthplace and places his father had told him about. After serving faithfully for two years, Niels departed from Copenhagen on 9 June 1884 aboard the steamer Argo. On the return trip, he met a beautiful Swedish orphan named Augusta Johnson. Although they couldn’t speak each other’s language, they fell in love (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 268, 279; Peterson, “A Short Sketch of My Life,” 6).

After returning to the States, Niels corresponded with Augusta, who had immigrated to Idaho. He went to Idaho to propose to her—a journey of ten days, which was, as he put it, “a long time for one who is not sure of his answer to his question.” Happily, she accepted his proposal, and they were married in the Logan Temple. After a six-week honeymoon, they settled in Richfield in a house that they would occupy for fifty-eight years (see Peterson, “A Short Sketch of My Life,” 6).

Niels served a year as a Richfield City Councilman, two terms as a city street supervisor, and one term as a county street supervisor. He was an alternate high councilman in the Sevier Stake from 1894 to 1901 (see Peterson, “A Short Sketch of My Life,” 7). In 1943, he received an award from the Presiding Bishopric of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints for serving longer than any other member as a ward teacher, an assignment he fulfilled for sixty-five years (see correspondence from Marilyn Anderson).

For many years, he attended the Richfield First Ward. During these years, he claimed, “It is my belief that our largest field for missionary work is among the descendants of our pioneer families” (Peterson, “A Short Sketch of My Life,” 6). He died in 1945 in Richfield at age eighty-seven.


Solomon Peterson

1845–1924

Residence: Santaquin, Utah Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 1 September 1881

Missionary labors: Göteborg Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 15 June 1883

Departure ship: Pacific (Milo)

Birth date: 7 November 1845

Birthplace: Fagerberg, Öreryd, Jönköping, Sweden

Father: Jönsson, Peter

Mother: Johannesdotter, Ingerd

Spouse: Ericksen, Albertina

Marriage date: 8 January 1872

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 17 December 1924

Death place: Santaquin, Utah Co., Utah

Burial place: Santaquin, Utah Co., Utah

At age twenty-one, Solomon joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Drammen, Buskerud County, Norway. He immigrated to America in 1866 and settled in Santaquin, Utah County, Utah. In that community, he worked as a miner and railroad builder. Some claimed that he was so strong that he could drive in a railroad spike with one stroke. When Brigham Young pounded in one of the last spikes at Promontory Point, he used Solomon’s hammer (see “Biography of Solomon Peterson,” 1).

Solomon sent money to Norway for Albertina Ericksen and her sister to immigrate to Utah. He later married Albertina in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City. He and his bride had four children and were living in Santaquin, when Solomon accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 1 September 1881 and was assigned to labor in the Göteborg Conference. While on this mission, he visited his old home and taught the gospel to his family, including his mother (see “Biography of Solomon Peterson,” 1). After serving an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 15 June 1883 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 262–63, 269).

Upon returning to Utah, he purchased acreage and began raising sheep. Eventually, he acquired five thousand sheep (see “Biography of Solomon Peterson,” 1).

He continued his service to the Church as a home missionary in the Nebo and Utah stakes. He served his community as a jury member in the District Court for four terms. His children recalled that he was very interested in education and helped them with their math and composition problems. He also taught them the law of tithing. He called his tithing receipts “my account with the Lord.” He died in 1924 in Santaquin at age seventy-nine (see “Biography of Solomon Peterson,” 1).

Hans David Petterson

(Hans Pärsson)

1832–1905

Residence: West Weber, Weber Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 7 November 1883

Missionary labors: Skåne Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 15 October 1885

Departure ship: Bravo

Birth date: 26 November 1832

Birthplace: Djurröd, Kristianstad, Sweden

Father: Hansson, Pär

Mother: Persdotter, Bengta

Spouse: McFarland, Mary Ann

Marriage date: 1 January 1861

Marriage place: Ogden, Weber Co., Utah

Death date: 11 January 1905

Death place: Ogden, Weber Co., Utah

Burial place: Ogden, Weber Co., Utah

Hans joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in 1853 and immigrated to Ogden, Weber County, in 1855.

In spring 1859, Hans and several other men bought land west and south of the Weber River from James Brown. They labored to get water to the land and to plant their crops. According to one of the co-owners, “I will say here that if it could have been seen by us, the time of labor we had to pass through before we got any water to our lands, I don’t think we would have had faith enough to commence the work, but after we once started it, we were determined not to give up, so the labor of years commenced.” They were so consumed with water problems that they didn’t stop to build houses for their families: “We camped in our wagons all summer and on into the winter, for we had our crops to put in and water ditches to make, both on the land and to it, for while the river was up we took out some water from a slough and watered some of our wheat. Then we turned our attention to getting houses to live in for the winter” (Carter, Our Pioneer Heritage, 9:387).

In 1859, Hans moved to West Weber, where he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 7 November 1883 and was assigned to labor in the Skåne Conference. He served as president of that conference from 1884 to 1885. At the close of an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 15 October 1885 aboard the steamer Bravo. In Liverpool he boarded the Nevada, along with three hundred other Latter-day Saint emigrants. Aboard ship, Hans served as an assistant to the president of the English Saints. Among his many duties was to hold prayer meetings twice a day—7 a.m. and 7 p.m. (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 274–75, 483).

He died on 11 January 1905 in Ogden, Weber County of heart trouble that he had suffered with for a year or so. He was age seventy-two. He was survived by a wife, four sons, and four daughters (see “Death of Aged Citizen,” Ogden Standard, 11 January 1905).


Christian Jorgensen Plowman

(Christian Jørgensen Plougmann)

1861–1948

Residence: Smithfield, Cache Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 14 June 1887

Missionary labors: Copenhagen Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 30 May 1889

Departure ship: Milo

Birth date: 4 October 1861

Birthplace: Brogaard Hede, Bedsted, Thisted, Denmark

Father: Plougmann, Jørgen Jacobsen (Plowman, John Jacobson)

Mother: Lauridsdatter, Mette Marie

Spouse: Raymond, Zilphia Amelia

Marriage date: 27 November 1889

Marriage place: Logan Temple, Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Death date: 30 September 1948

Death place: Smithfield, Cache Co., Utah

Burial place: Smithfield, Cache Co., Utah

In 1865, Christian’s parents joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. In April 1866, they took their family to America aboard the Humboldt. Two of Christian’s siblings died on the voyage. The parents and remaining two children settled in Mantua, Box Elder County, Utah. As a child, Christian recalled his parents making him wear wooden shoes because they didn’t have money to buy leather ones. Neighborhood children teased him, calling him “Wooden,” which made him so angry that one day he kicked a fence and broke his shoe. After the incident, he had to go barefoot (see Ripplinger, “Christian Jorgensen Plowman,” 1–2).

Christian was living in Smithfield, Cache County, Utah, when he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 14 June 1887 and was assigned to labor in the Copenhagen Conference. During this mission, he and his companion stayed in a very fancy home owned by a family member. They were told that they could remain in the home as long as they never mentioned anything about the gospel. Each night they put their clothes in the hall, and each morning their clothes were pressed and their shoes shined. At the close of an honorable mission, Christian departed from Copenhagen on 30 May 1889 aboard the steamer Milo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 304, 309).

Soon after he returned to Utah, he married his sweetheart, Zilphia Amelia Raymond. They were known as the “Pioneer Sweethearts of Smithfield” (see Ripplinger, “Christian Jorgensen Plowman,” 2–3).

Christian served a second mission to Scandinavia in 1899. His biographer wrote, “Ever faithful to his church, he left his wife, young family, farm and friends to fulfill his assignment, using money they had saved to buy more land. With him, the work of the Lord came first” (Ripplinger, “Christian Jorgensen Plowman,” 3).

When he returned, he found that his father had bought land for him. When Christian was able, he repaid his father. During the ensuing years, he was credited with being a builder of the first culinary water system in Smithfield. His bigger contribution was serving for fourteen years as bishop of the Smithfield First Ward, which numbered one thousand four hundred people. Preferring to teach by example, he never preached a sermon except at funerals (see Ripplinger, “Christian Jorgensen Plowman,” 3).

Christian helped build the Logan Temple and the Smithfield Tabernacle. He also served on the local high council and as president of the YMMIA. His granddaughter, Roberta Morgan, reported that he “was very gifted with the ‘spirit of healing.’ I remember times when he would go to the homes of very sick people to give them a blessing and the ‘Spirit’ prompted him to promise a complete recovery. He was always directed what to say. Many times I can remember him coming home and pacing the floor in concern for the very sick people and wondered how he could have made such a promise, but he was a man of such great faith and spirituality that the Lord always prompted him and guided him” (correspondence from Roberta R. Morgan, 30 November 1999).

One of his favorite sayings was, “There is no such thing as luck, work and planning does it.” He died in 1948 in Smithfield at age eighty-six (correspondence from Roberta R. Morgan, 30 November 1999).


John Jacobsen Plowman

1867–1926

Residence: Smithfield, Cache Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 5 November 1892

Missionary labors: Århus Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 25 October 1894

Departure ship: Rona

Birth date: 25 December 1867

Birthplace: Mantua, Box Elder, Utah

Father: Plowman, Jorgen

Mother: Lauritzen, Mette Marie

Spouse: Andersen, Mary Christine

Marriage date: 17 November 1887

Marriage place: Logan Temple, Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Death date: 17 October 1926

Death place: Smithfield, Cache Co., Utah

Burial place: Smithfield, Cache Co., Utah

John was born on Christmas Day in 1867 in a log cabin in Mantua, Box Elder County, Utah. He was baptized on 5 July 1877 by Alonzo G. Barber. He had little formal education since he was hired in his youth to work as a farmer and a carpenter.

He was ordained an elder in 1892 just before his first mission. John sold his only horse and cow to fund the first of three missions (see Allsop, “The Life Story of My Father, John Jacob Plowman,” 46–47). He arrived in Copenhagen on 5 November 1892 and was assigned to labor in the Århus Conference. Most of his missionary labors were in the Randers Branch. He served faithfully for two years before departing from Copenhagen on 25 October 1894 aboard the steamer Rona (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 328, 337).

On 14 October 1903, John was ordained a seventy by Seymour B. Young. Soon after his ordination, he was called on a second mission. He arrived in Copenhagen on 28 November 1903 and was assigned to be president of the Ålborg Conference from 1904 until his departure in 1905 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 398, 496). Of these two missions, his daughter claimed that “he converted many people and made many friends” and “was dearly loved by the Saints. He also sent several orphaned boys and girls to Utah to live with LDS families” (Allsop, “The Life Story of My Father, John Jacob Plowman,” 47).

After returning to Utah, he fulfilled callings in his ward. In addition, he was a president of the Seventeenth Quorum of the Seventy and president of the local stake high priests. He also served in the public sector as a city councilman from 1912 to 1915 and vice president of the Logan Northern Canal Company. He was viewed by community leaders as “a prominent farmer and dairyman,” promoting agricultural interests in the area. He owned purebred milk cows and “took great pride” in them (Allsop, “Life Story of My Father,” 47; Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 3:196).

On 25 December 1915, he returned to Denmark to fulfill a third mission. At the time, he was suffering from severe rheumatism and was unable to stand up straight. He served as the president of the Christiania Conference from 1917 to 1919 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 441, 507). When influenza became a worldwide epidemic, John “cared for the sick and carried out the dead. He never contracted the disease himself, but was protected at all times.” He honorably completed the third mission and arrived home on 20 January 1920. He had “again made many converts and wonderful friends” and “was presented with many beautiful gifts before returning home” (Allsop, “Life Story of My Father,” 48). To him, the greatest gift was bringing home one thousand two hundred names of relatives that were submitted for temple work.

John died from a paralytic stroke in 1926 in Smithfield at age fifty-eight. His funeral was “one of the most impressive and well-attended . . . ever held in Smithfield.” Many of those attending were missionary companions and friends who traveled far to honor him (Allsop, “Life Story of My Father,” 48).

Hans Poulsen

1837–95

Residence: Mount Pleasant, Sanpete Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 12 September 1882

Missionary labors: Århus Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 9 June 1884

Departure ship: Milo

Birth date: 27 September 1837

Birthplace: Batterne, Fraugde, Odense, Denmark

Father: Rasmussen, Poul

Mother: Hansdatter, Maren

Spouse: Andersen, Maren

Marriage date: 15 February 1863

Marriage place: Mount Pleasant, Sanpete Co., Utah

Death date: 22 November 1895

Death place: Mount Pleasant, Sanpete Co., Utah

Burial place: Mount Pleasant, Sanpete Co., Utah

On 9 April 1855, Hans was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Bogense, Odense County. He labored as a local missionary in the Langeland, Svendborg County and Middlefast, Odense County branches. He and his mother immigrated to America in April 1859. Unfortunately, his mother died crossing the plains. After her death, Hans continued his journey to reach the Salt Lake Valley. By 1861 he had settled in Mount Pleasant, Sanpete County (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 202).

By 1863, he had married Maren Andersen and was supporting her by doing carpentry work. He made coffins, which he usually painted black. He also worked outside of Mount Pleasant to help in the construction of the Salt Lake Theater and ZCMI (see “Hans Poulsen,” 1).

When called on a mission, he was building his house. He left it unfinished to serve the mission. Although his wife was “rather upset that he would leave her in that kind of situation,” she had a dream in which he appeared to her, assuring her that “it would be well for her,” and “she felt better after that.” He arrived in Copenhagen on 12 September 1882 and was assigned to labor in the Århus Conference—specifically the isle of Fyn. At the close of this mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 9 June 1884 aboard the steamer Milo (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 202; Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 267–68, 279).

After returning to Mount Pleasant, Hans was selected as a councilor to the mayor. In 1891, he was appointed president of the Twin Creek Irrigation Company. In 1907, he served as the Mount Pleasant City Marshal, being paid two dollars a day. During this time, he held stock in the local ZCMI and helped maintain the Mount Pleasant dance hall. He also served as a president of the Eighty-seventh Quorum of the Seventy and for many years as the “head teacher” in the Mount Pleasant Second Ward (see “Hans Poulsen,” 1–2). Hans died in 1895 in Mount Pleasant at age fifty-eight.

James Poulsen

(Jens Poulsen)

1831–1920

Residence: Liberty, Bear Lake Co., Idaho

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 9 May 1888

Missionary labors: Copenhagen Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 29 May 1890

Departure ship: Bravo

Birth date: 28 October 1831

Birthplace: Kirke Stillinge, Sorø, Denmark

Father: Nielsen, Poul

Mother: Klim, Kirsten Katrine

Spouse: Nielsen, Kirsten Jensen

Marriage date: 29 December 1851

Marriage place: Denmark

Spouse: Arff, Maren Kirstina

Marriage date: June 1862

Marriage place: Florence, Douglas Co., Nebraska

Spouse: Humphreys, Mary

Marriage date: 15 February 1870

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Jensen, Trine Nelsen

Marriage date: 26 July 1885

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 2 September 1920

Death place: Liberty, Bear Lake Co., Idaho

Burial place: Liberty, Bear Lake Co., Idaho

James’s father died when he was young. He received the typical schooling of the time until he was twelve years old. He then left school to help on the family farm. From 1848 to 1850, he served in the Danish army. After that, he bought a small farm and married (see Poulsen, James Poulsen: A Faithful Dane, 5–8).

On 6 January 1859, James and his wife were baptized members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints by Ole Poulsen. Soon after their baptism, James sold the farm and made plans to immigrate to America. However, before he and his family could leave Denmark, he was called on a local mission. He settled his family in a rented apartment and served a mission for two years before emigrating (see Poulsen, James Poulsen: A Faithful Dane, 14).

 

On the journey to America, measles and dysentery broke out aboard ship, claiming many lives. Among those to succumb were his wife and three children. He also came close to death: “At one time it was a matter of debate whether he was still living or had actually died. Some insisted he was dead and preparations were contemplated for his burial at sea” (Poulsen, James Poulsen: A Faithful Dane, 18).

Shattered by his losses, he wanted to return to Denmark. However, before he did so, he met a young woman named Maren Kirstina Arff. She convinced him to continue his journey, and they later married. On 1 October 1862, he arrived with the Joseph Horne company in the Salt Lake Valley. He and his wife settled in Providence, Cache County (see Poulsen, James Poulsen: A Faithful Dane, 19, 32).

In that community, James built a small, dirt-roofed home and hired himself out as a farmer and builder. In 1863, he moved his family to Paris, Bear Lake County, Idaho. By 1866, he had returned to Providence. There he paid his emigration debt; purchased a house, a cow, some pigs, and chickens; and began farming again. However, four years later he and his family returned to Bear Lake County, this time to stay (see Poulsen, James Poulsen: A Faithful Dane, 34–44).

James bought a 129-acre farm in Liberty, Bear Lake County. In that small community, he served on the school board until the passage of the Edmunds Act of 1882. Then James hid from the law to avoid arrest for cohabitation. He evaded Idaho’s marshals most of the time. However, once he was accosted. On that occasion, he demanded that a warrant be read aloud before he would go with the marshal. “The man, not expecting this demand, was somewhat taken aback. He fumbled in his pocket, and drew out a paper, unfolded it and began to read aloud, but was unable to speak. He tried several times, . . . but the words did not come.” Frustrated and embarrassed, he finally gave up and left. James often recalled this incident as an instance of “the power of God being manifested in his behalf” (Poulsen, James Poulsen: A Faithful Dane, 71–72).

In 1888, he returned to Scandinavia. At that time, he had three living wives and fourteen children. He arrived in Copenhagen on 9 May 1888 and was assigned to labor in the Copenhagen Conference. During this mission, he bore his testimony to relatives. When he departed from Denmark on 29 May 1890 aboard the steamer Bravo, he had with him twenty-two relatives who had joined the Church because of his influence (see Poulsen, James Poulsen: A Faithful Dane, 78; Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 307, 315).

After returning to the States, James worked as a farmer and served in many ways in his local ward and stake. He was a home missionary for fifteen years, with a monthly assignment to visit every ward from Soda Springs, Caribou County, Idaho, to Woodruff, Rich County, Utah—a distance of nearly one hundred miles. He went on missionary trips that lasted one to three days every month, requiring him to make long journeys by wagon or buggy in the summer and by sleigh in the winter. He was also a member of the stake high council. James remained in good health until his death in 1920 in Liberty at age eighty-eight (see Poulsen, James Poulsen: A Faithful Dane, 88–89).


Ole Poulsen

1821–99

Residence: Brigham City, Box Elder Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 20 April 1885

Missionary labors: Copenhagen Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 7 April 1887

Departure ship: Panther

Birth date: 10 October 1821

Birthplace: Kulbye, Finderup, Holbæk , Denmark

Father: Olsen, Poul

Mother: Christiansdatter, Agathe

Spouse: Hansen, Annie Margrethe

Spouse: Rasmussen, Martha Marie

Marriage date: 20 October 1852

Marriage place: Denmark

Spouse: Peterson, Annie Johanna Marie

Marriage date: 1 August 1884

Marriage place: Logan Temple, Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Spouse: Hansen, Bodil Maria

Marriage date: 1871

Marriage place: Brigham City, Box Elder Co., Utah

Spouse: Christensen, Ane Kristine

Death date: 28 May 1899

Death place: Brigham City, Box Elder Co., Utah

Burial place: Brigham City, Box Elder Co., Utah

Ole was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Denmark. He and his wife arrived in Box Elder County, Utah, in fall 1862. Their first home was located near the Box Elder Creek. He used the waterpower from the creek to operate a saw and molasses mill. In addition to these enterprises, he opened a furniture shop and a gristmill (see Huchel, History of Box Elder County, 128; “Brigham City,” Deseret Evening News, 3 June 1899).

While a resident of Brigham City, Box Elder County, he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 20 April 1885 and was assigned to labor in the Copenhagen Conference. After completing an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 7 April 1887 aboard the steamer Panther (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 293, 295, 302).

He returned to Brigham City, where he died of consumption in 1899 at age seventy-seven. At the time, he was a member of the Brigham City Third Ward (see “Brigham City,” Deseret Evening News, 3 June 1899).


Christian Michael Poulson

(Christian Michael Pedersen)

1848–1915

Residence: Richfield, Sevier Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 3 May 1882

Missionary labors: Ålborg Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 19 October 1883

Departure ship: Milo

Birth date: 28 August 1848

Birthplace: Vejby, Hjørring, Denmark

Father: Poulsen, Peder Jensen

Mother: Andersdatter, Sidsel Cathrine

Spouse: Outzen, Ana Katarine

Marriage date: 25 May 1874

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Jensen, Annie Macelia

Marriage date: 30 January 1892

Marriage place: Manti Temple, Manti, Sanpete Co., Utah

Death date: 17 August 1915

Death place: Richfield, Sevier Co., Utah

Burial place: Richfield Cemetery, Richfield, Sevier Co., Utah

Christian’s parents were members of the Lutheran Church before his mother joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in 1860. His father was angry with her decision to become a Latter-day Saint. Friends and neighbors shunned the family because of her membership. To end the persecution, Christian’s mother left her husband and immigrated to America with some of her children. The youngest was too young to leave his father according to Danish law. Christian was fourteen years old at the time of emigration (see Poulson, “Christian Michael Poulson: A Complete Biographical Sketch of His Life,” 1).

He embarked aboard the Franklin on 15 April 1862 from Liverpool bound for America. On the voyage across the Atlantic Ocean, forty-three children died of measles aboard ship. Fortunately, all members of the Poulson family survived. They journeyed across the plains with the Joseph Murdock ox team company and arrived on 22 September 1862 in the Salt Lake Valley. They settled in Pleasant Grove, Utah County, where Christian was baptized on 19 October 1862 by N. P. Larson. The next spring, they moved to Gunnison, Sanpete County, where they raised wheat for a year. In 1864, they moved to Richfield, Sevier County. Christian and his brothers built the first schoolhouse and helped dig a nine-mile canal in that community (see Poulson, “Christian Michael Poulson: A Complete Biographical Sketch of His Life,” 2–3).

In 1865, Christian served in the militia to protect settlers during the Black Hawk War. Two years later, Brigham Young suggested that he and his family to move to Fountain Green, Sanpete County. They followed his suggestion until 1871, when they returned to Richfield (see Poulson, “Christian Michael Poulson: A Complete Biographical Sketch of His Life,” 3).

During his youthful years, Christian helped build the Manti Temple. When the United Order was established in Richfield, he joined. He is remembered for trading a nine-hundred-pound horse for a city block on Main Street. He proved to be a good businessman. He prospered by renting property and managing a hotel, a livery stable, and a feed yard. He also prospered by renting sleighs and sleigh bells during the winter (see Poulson, “Christian Michael Poulson: A Complete Biographical Sketch of His Life,” 3).

In 1882, Christian accepted a mission call to Denmark. He arrived in Copenhagen on 3 May 1882 and was assigned to labor in the Ålborg Conference. While serving in Thisted, Thisted County, he and his companion were arrested for preaching the gospel. Before their trial, they were imprisoned for several days. During this difficult time, Christian and his companion were not discouraged; rather, they “rejoiced for having had the privilege to suffer for Christ’s sake. Their feelings didn’t change when “police officers, kept their books and pamphlets, [and] said that they intended to burn them.” Eventually, he and his companion were released. Christian continued to preach the gospel until 19 October 1883, when he boarded the steamer Milo and began his voyage to America (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 267, 270).

Returning to Utah once again, Christian became prosperous through his business pursuits. He rented horses and carts, imported molasses, and owned a fine stock of purebred horses and cattle. Although self-educated, he was an excellent penman, mathematician, and handyman—even a dentist. His daughter Agnes remembers that he was “honest, religious, and thrifty,” “jovial,” and “often step-danced on the broad back of a big horse that pulled a little cart wherever he wanted to go.” He also enjoyed good health until contracting Bright’s disease. The disease led to much suffering and a coma. He eventually died from the effects of this disease and an accident in 1915 in Richfield at age sixty-six (see Poulson, “Christian Michael Poulson: A Complete Biographical Sketch of His Life,” 4).


John Anderson Quist

(Johan Andreasson)

1845–90

Residence: Big Cottonwood, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 27 November 1877

Missionary labors: Göteborg Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 23 June 1879

Departure ship: Cato

Birth date: 11 December 1845

Birthplace: Helltorp, Ytterby, Göteborg, Sweden

Father: Quist, Andreas Anderson

Mother: Petterson, Anna Katrina

Spouse: Hendin (Henden), Mary Christina

Marriage date: 17 April 1871

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Olson, Anne (Anna) Beotta

Spouse: Larsen, Hanna (Anna)

Death date: 13 March 1890

Death place: Vingåker, Södermanland, Sweden

Burial place: Sanna Cemetery, Göteborg, Sweden

On 7 June 1863, John was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints by F. G. Bondnevier. For six years, he served as a local missionary in Norway and Sweden. In 1869, he immigrated to America and settled in Big Cottonwood, Salt Lake County, Utah (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 2:696).

John was called on a mission to Sweden in 1877. He arrived in Copenhagen on 27 November 1877 and was assigned to labor in the Göteborg Conference—first as a traveling elder and later as president of the conference. At the close of an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 23 June 1879 aboard the steamer Cato. Aboard ship, he had responsibility for a company of emigrating Latter-day Saints (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 230–31, 240).

In 1884, he was set apart as a home missionary in the Salt Lake Stake. At that time, he also served as a president of the Seventy-second Quorum of the Seventy (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 2:696). Three years later, John accepted another mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 19 July 1887 and was assigned to labor in the Göteborg Conference (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 304–5). On this mission, he kept a daily journal for three years. In the journal, he wrote of his hard feelings towards backbiting Latter-day Saints. He also wrote of renewing his acquaintances with relatives, of being well received, and of attending excellent meetings. His missionary journal also contains details like traveling on foot, staying with various members, holding meetings, teaching investigators, baptizing, and debating with clergy (see Quist, “History of John A. Quist’s Third Mission,” 18).

In the winter of 1890, in Vingåker, Södermanland County, Sweden, John contracted an illness that resulted in his death. On the evening of 12 March 1890, priesthood holders “annoint[ed] him and seal[ed] him to the Lord.” After this, he enjoyed peace until his death at 2:45 a.m. on 13 March 1890. As he lay on his deathbed, he asked an elder if he “could hear music, to which he later answered no. Then replied Brother Quist, ‘I hear the angels singing. Their song is so beautiful.’” According to his dying wish, he was buried in Göteborg. He was the first Latter-day Saint missionary to die in Sweden (see Quist, “History of John A. Quist’s Third Mission,” 18–19). In his History of the Scandinavian Mission, Andrew Jenson eulogized him: “He was one of the most successful and faithful Elders in the mission” (Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 313).