M

Susan Easton Black, Shauna C. Anderson Young, and Ruth Ellen Maness, section M in Legacy of Sacrifice: Missionaries to Scandinavia, 1872–94 (Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, 2007), 259–83.

Hans Jacobsen Madsen

(Hans Jacobsen)

1840–1909

Residence: Ogden, Weber Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 4 May 1880

Missionary labors: Århus Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 14 October 1881

Name of departure ship: Milo

Birth date: 30 January 1840

Birthplace: Harhøishuus, Rostrup, Ålborg, Denmark

Father: Christensen, Jacob

Mother: Hansdatter, Dorthea Kerstein

Spouse: Broome, Ann Elizabeth

Marriage date: 4 March 1865

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 23 January 1909

Death place: Ogden, Weber Co., Utah

Burial place: Ogden City Cemetery, Ogden, Weber Co., Utah

Hans was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on 17 January 1856 by F. C. Klingbek. He immigrated to the United States and settled in Marriott, Weber County, Utah.

At the April conference of 1880, Hans, a resident of Ogden, Weber County, Utah, was called to serve in the Scandinavian Mission (see Conference Report, April 1880, 66). He arrived in Copenhagen on 4 May 1880. After completing this mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 14 October 1881 aboard the steamer Milo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 309).

Hans was one of the early settlers of Weber County. He was an associate of W. G. Childs in the lumber business. He was also involved in the creamery business with his sons. He served as superintendent of the Sunday Schools at Marriott and as first counselor in the Marriott Ward.

Hans died at his home on West Twelfth Street in Ogden of severe stomach trouble on 23 January 1909. He had been afflicted for some time with the condition (see “Hans Madson Dies at Home on Twelfth Street,” Ogden Standard, 23 January 1909). The funeral was held at the Ogden Tabernacle. Elder David O. McKay was one of the speakers. Hans was eulogized as “a man of splendid worth and one who had been a benefactor of no mean importance in the up building of the community in which he lived for so many years.” He was further characterized as “a man of splendid accomplishments in every respect; kind, affectionate and manly in all the things that he undertook to do in life” (“Pioneer Is Laid to Rest,” Ogden Standard, 27 January 1909). His wife and five children mourned his passing.


Jacob Madsen

1860–1942

Residence: Bloomington, Bear Lake Co., Idaho

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 14 June 1887

Missionary labors: Ålborg Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 30 May 1889

Name of departure ship: Milo

Birth date: 6 January 1860

Birthplace: Ogden, Weber Co., Utah

Father: Christensen, Jacob

Mother: Jensen, Dorthe (Dorothea) Christine

Spouse: Krogue, Mary Catherine

Marriage date: 28 April 1887

Marriage place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Death date: 19 November 1942

Death place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Burial place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

In July 1868, Jacob was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Bloomington, Bear Lake County, Idaho, by Benjamin Brindle. He was ordained a seventy and served in the Sixth Quorum of the Seventy until receiving his endowment on 28 April 1887 in the Logan Temple (see FamilySearch; Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 159).

Near this time, he was called to serve a mission to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 14 June 1887 and was assigned to labor in the Ålborg Conference. During this assignment, he served as president of the Ålborg Branch (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 159). After completing this mission, Jacob departed from Copenhagen on 30 May 1889 aboard the steamer Milo with 239 emigrating Latter-day Saints and twelve other returning missionaries (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 304–5, 309).

After his arrival in the West, he moved to Teton Valley in Wyoming, where he worked as a farmer and a cattleman. Jacob died in 1942 of causes incident to age in Logan, Cache County, Utah, at age eighty-two (see “Jacob Madsen,” Salt Lake Tribune, 20 November 1942).


Mads Petersen Madsen

1856–1917

Residence: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 1 November 1884

Missionary labors: Copenhagen Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 21 June 1886

Name of departure ship: Otto

Birth date: 25 March 1856

Birthplace: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

Father: Madsen, Peter

Mother: Nielsen, Ellen

Spouse: Nilsson (Olsen, Johnson), Josephine

Marriage date: 26 June 1876

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 23 January 1917

Death place: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

Burial place: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

Mads was baptized on 6 November 1864 at age eight. Soon after his baptism, the Black Hawk War broke out. He was pierced by an arrow while playing outside of Fort Ephraim (see History of Sanpete and Emery Counties, Utah, 328–29).

He received his endowment on 26 June 1876 in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City. Eight years later, he was called to serve in the Scandinavian Mission. He arrived in Copenhagen on 1 November 1884 and was assigned to labor in the Copenhagen Conference. During his missionary service, Mads was mobbed on 12 February 1885 at a meeting in Kalundborg, Holbæk, Denmark (see Jenson, LDS Church Chronology, 12 February 1885). He completed this mission and departed from Copenhagen on 21 June 1886 aboard the steamer Otto with 290 emigrating Latter-day Saints and ten other returning missionaries (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 282–83, 297).

Mads returned to Ephraim, where he acquired twenty-five acres for farming purposes. Although he supported his family through farming, he served his community as a justice of the peace. He was a member of a quorum of the seventy and a counselor in the YMMIA. He is remembered for doing temple work for kindred dead in the Manti and St. George Temples (see History of Sanpete and Emery Counties, Utah, 328–29). He died in 1917 in Ephraim at age sixty.

Soren Madsen

(Søren Madsen)

1825–87

Residence: Milton, Davis Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 3 May 1882

Missionary labors: Århus Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 4 April 1884

Name of departure ship: Milo

Birth date: 1 July 1825

Birthplace: True, Svenstrup, Randers, Denmark

Father: Sørensen, Mads

Mother: Jensdatter, Maren

Spouse: Hansen, Bertha Katherine

Marriage date: 9 October 1855

Marriage place: Trinitatis-Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark

Spouse: Sorensen, Amelia Margaretha

Marriage date: Before 1884

Marriage place: Utah

Death date: 3 November 1887

Death place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Burial place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

On 9 February 1856, Soren was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Denmark. Soon after his baptism, he and his family immigrated to America. By 1860, they had crossed the plains and were residing in Utah (see Mountains Conquered, The Story of Morgan, 333).

Soren obtained employment as a carpenter and millwright. He built everything from furniture and bobsleds to barns. By 1861, he and his family were living in Morgan Valley, where he built an adobe home a mile north of Milton, Davis County. His family reported his enthusiasm for building by claiming that he carried “a bushel of wheat on his back, walked over the mountains to Salt Lake City to trade it for a brace and bit he needed for his carpentry work” (Mountains Conquered: The Story of Morgan, 333).

Soren was endowed on 16 November 1867 in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City. He was not called to serve a mission to Scandinavia until 1882. He arrived in Copenhagen on 3 May 1882 and was assigned to labor in the Århus Conference. After completing this mission, Soren departed from Copenhagen on 4 April 1884 aboard the steamer Milo with eighty-seven emigrating Latter-day Saints and four other returning missionaries (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 267–68, 278).

He died of typhoid fever in 1887 in Logan at age sixty-three. He was a member of the Logan Sixth Ward (see “Soren Madsen,” Deseret Evening News, 17 November 1887).


Hans Olsen Magleby

1835–1903

Residence: Moroni, Sanpete Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 1 September 1881

Missionary labors: Christiania and Copenhagen conferences

Departure date from Copenhagen: 15 June 1883

Name of departure ship: Pacific (Milo)

Birth date: 14 April 1835

Birthplace: Dragør, Store Magleby (Amager Island), Copenhagen, Denmark

Father: Magleby, Ole Jensen

Mother: Heinsdatter, Johanna Jan

Spouse: Christensen (Roe), Gjertrud Marie

Marriage date: 8 May 1859

Marriage place: aboard William Tapscott

Spouse: Svendsen, Elisa Marthine Olsen

Marriage date: 12 December 1863

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Larsen, Ane

Marriage date: 8 May 1884

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 16 August 1903

Death place: Monroe, Sevier Co., Utah

Burial place: Monroe, Sevier Co., Utah

While attending a trade school in Denmark, Hans listened to missionaries from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He accepted their gospel message and was baptized on 24 October 1855 by Elder Thuesen. Soon after his baptism, he was ordained an elder and assigned to labor as a missionary in Denmark and Norway for three years. He was arrested several times in Norway for preaching Mormonism. In spring 1857, police authorities in Drammen, Buskerud, Norway, not only arrested him but took him from town to town in a two-wheeled carriage so many could see a captured Mormon before setting him free. Rather than becoming discouraged, Hans kept preaching. He was imprisoned again on 28 November 1857 and again on 15 February 1859. From prison, he wrote, “Today [February 18] it is two years since I was sitting here the first time” (Journal of Hans Olsen Magleby). Hans was liberated on 9 March 1859 after paying a fine of 150 speciedaler. In total, he was imprisoned seven times for the gospel’s sake (see “The Life History of Hans Olsen Magleby,” 20–36).

He journeyed in 1859 aboard the William Tapscott from Liverpool to America. Aboard ship, he worked as a cook (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 140). He crossed the plains in Captain George Rowley’s handcart company (see Carter, Our Pioneer Heritage, 14:323). On the trek across the plains, he served as a captain of a smaller group of Saints within the larger company (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 144). After arriving in Utah, he received his endowment on 20 June 1862 in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City (see FamilySearch).

Hans resided in Salt Lake City from 1859 to 1865 before moving to Morgan, Morgan County, Utah. From Morgan, he moved to Brigham City, Box Elder County, and then in 1875 to Monroe, Sevier County, where he participated in the United Order (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 162).

In 1881, he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 1 September 1881 and was assigned to labor in the Christiania and Copenhagen conferences. After completing this mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 15 June 1883. After arriving in Hull, England, he went by train to Liverpool. On the steamship Nevada, which sailed from Liverpool on 20 June 1883, Hans was the leader of 697 Latter-day Saints, including twenty-two returning missionaries (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 144). The company arrived in New York Harbor on 1 July 1883 and in Ogden, Weber County, Utah, on 7 July 1883 (see Jenson, LDS Church Chronology, 1 July 1883).

On 5 March 1900, Hans was ordained a patriarch in the Sevier Stake by Anthon H. Lund. He served in this assignment until his death on 16 August 1903 (see Warnock, Memories of Sevier Stake, 95). In recalling his devotion to the Church, one biographer wrote, “Elder Magleby was a man with marked ability and a most faithful servant of God” (Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 126). Hans died in 1903 in Monroe at age sixty-eight.

Christian Magnuson

(Kristian Carlsson)

1857–1913

Residence: South Cottonwood, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 18 December 1891

Missionary labors: Stockholm Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 16 November 1893

Birth date: 16 January 1857

Birthplace: Unsala, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden

Father: Magnusson, Carl Frederick

Mother: Andersdotter, Anna Lovisa

Spouse: Pehrson (Peterson), Ingrid

Marriage date: 21 November 1888

Marriage place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Death date: 20 March 1913

Death place: Pleasant Grove, Utah Co., Utah

Burial place: Pleasant Grove Cemetery, Pleasant Grove, Utah Co., Utah

Christian embraced the gospel of Jesus Christ in his native land. He began his journey to Utah on 15 June 1885 and settled in South Cottonwood, Salt Lake County, Utah (see “Christian Magnuson Dies at Pleasant Grove,” Deseret News, 7 April 1913). While a resident of that community, he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1891. He arrived in Copenhagen on 18 December 1891 and was assigned to labor in the Stockholm Conference. After completing an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 16 November 1893 with three other returning missionaries and twenty-one emigrating Latter-day Saints (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 320–21, 333).

Returning to the States, he moved with his wife to Pleasant Grove, Utah County, Utah. In March 1913, Christian struggled with bronchitis and lay in bed only a few days before succumbing to the illness. He died in 1913 at his home in Pleasant Grove at age fifty-six. His funeral was held in the Lindon Ward chapel. His biographer said of him, “[He] was an unassuming, honest and industrious man, highly respected and loved by all who knew him” (“Christian Magnuson Dies at Pleasant Grove,” Deseret News, 7 April 1913).


Lawrence Christian Mariger

(Lorenz Christian Mariager)

1848–1921

Residence: Kanab, Kane Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 30 September 1879

Missionary labors: Ålborg Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 20 June 1881

Name of departure ship: Hero

Birth date: 8 October 1848

Birthplace: Vennebjerg, Hjørring, Denmark

Father: Mariager, Jørgen Sørensen

Mother: Madsdatter, Elsie

Spouse: Stewart, Sarah Lucretia

Marriage date: 11 January 1877

Marriage place: St. George Temple, St. George, Washington Co., Utah

Spouse: Farnsworth, Mary Melinda

Marriage date: 15 February 1882

Marriage place: St. George Temple, St. George, Washington Co., Utah

Death date: 14 February 1921

Death place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Burial place: Salt Lake City Cemetery, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

In 1856, the first Mormon missionaries came to the Mariger home. To Lawrence, his mother, and other siblings, the missionaries “appeared to be men of God” (Mariger, “Lawrence Christian Mariger: Sketch of His Life,” 2). The father in the home, who was a schoolteacher, did not agree, and it was not long before religious differences led his mother to seek a divorce.

Lawrence moved with his mother to Hjørring, where he was baptized on 22 April 1860 near midnight to avoid persecution. Soon after his baptism, he and his mother traveled to the seacoast using fictitious names. Lawrence used the name of Jens Andersen. They boarded the steamer Waldemar bound for Copenhagen. From Copenhagen, they traveled to Liverpool, where they boarded the William Tapscott with 731 other Latter-day Saints. They traveled in safety to America but were forced to remain aboard ship for several days after docking due to an outbreak of smallpox (see Mariger, “Lawrence Christian Mariger: Sketch of His Life,” 3–4).

Upon being released from the quarantine in New York Harbor, the Marigers went by train and then boat to Florence, Douglas County, Nebraska. There, they were outfitted for their journey across the plains. With a company of four hundred emigrating Latter-day Saints under the leadership of William Budge, Lawrence arrived in Salt Lake City on 5 October 1860. Unfortunately, during the trek his mother died (see Mariger, “Lawrence Christian Mariger: Sketch of His Life,” 4).

Lawrence settled in Bountiful, Davis County, Utah, before moving to Virgin City, Washington County, in southern Utah (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 165). He was employed as a mail carrier from Cedar City, Iron County, to Santa Clara, Washington County. By 1868, he was working for the railroad in the Bear River area of Wyoming. Later he worked in coal mines and a hotel (see Mariger, “Lawrence Christian Mariger: Sketch of His Life,” 5).

By 1870, Lawrence purchased part of the Gould Ranch. On the ranch, he grew sugarcane before moving to Kanab, Kane County, where he operated a store (see Mariger, “Lawrence Christian Mariger: Sketch of His Life,” 5).

During this enterprising period of his life, he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. In 1879, he was set apart for the mission by Elder Moses Thatcher. He arrived in Copenhagen on 30 September 1879 and was assigned to labor in the Ålborg Conference and later the Hjørring Branch. His fondest memory on the mission was finding his estranged father. He penned of his father, “He embraced me, and shed tears, and was very glad to see me. . . . He was very good to me, furnishing me fruit and other luxuries.” In his missionary journal, he penned a day-to-day account of his labors. His journal reveals, “Cold, long walks in bad weather, sometimes hunger, were not his only enemies, lonesomeness for home bothered him greatly.” On this mission, he baptized twenty-three converts but not his father (see Mariger, “Lawrence Christian Mariger: Sketch of His Life,” 7–8). After completing an honorable mission, Lawrence departed from Copenhagen on 20 June 1881 aboard the steamer Hero with 462 emigrating Latter-day Saints and many other returning missionaries (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 238–39, 255).

Upon reaching Utah, Lawrence learned that his family was financially strapped and that his business partnership had been dissolved. He worked to rectify the situation. He became the manager of the Kanab Telegraph Office and formed another partnership to market cattle (see Mariger, “Lawrence Christian Mariger: Sketch of His Life,” 8–9). As he struggled to regain his financial security, he did not neglect his Church work. He served as a counselor in the bishopric, superintendent of the Sunday School, and president of the YMMIA. He later served as a clerk and recorder for the Kanab Stake of Zion from 1883 to 1887. From 1887 to 1895, he was bishop of the Kanab Ward (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 165).

Lawrence was a county assessor and collector. He was also president of the Kanab Irrigation Company, superintendent of the Kanab Mercantile and Manufacturing Company, and superintendent of the Kanab Co-op Stock Company (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 165).

As the years passed, antipolygamy legislation caused havoc in his life. He was tried for unlawful cohabitation but was released for lack of evidence. In 1891, he moved his family to Salt Lake City so that family members could have a better opportunity for learning and culture. In Salt Lake, he entered into several business ventures—the most successful was the Utah Music Company. In spite of the success, he left Salt Lake City for a short time to homestead in Lonetree, Uinta County, Wyoming. Frustrated by his experiences in Wyoming, he returned to Salt Lake City (see Mariger, “Lawrence Christian Mariger: Sketch of His Life,” 10–12). Lawrence died in 1921 in Salt Lake City at age seventy-three.

Erasmus Peter Marquardson

(Rasmus Peder Marcussen)

1845–93

Residence: Elsinore, Sevier Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 24 December 1884

Missionary labors: Århus and Copenhagen conferences

Departure date from Copenhagen: 7 October 1886

Name of departure ship: Milo

Birth date: 2 January 1845

Birthplace: Snarup, Krarup, Svendborg, Denmark

Father: Rasmussen (Marquard), Marcus

Mother: Pedersdatter, Karen

Spouse: Rosenquist, Nellie

Marriage date: 6 June 1870

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Jensen, Petrine Marie

Marriage date: 25 October 1883

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 31 March 1893

Death place: Elsinore, Sevier Co., Utah

Burial place: Elsinore, Sevier Co., Utah

When his father died, Erasmus was one year old. His mother joined with Mormonism in 1860 and his stepfather, Mads Jensen, joined in 1861. Erasmus was baptized on 21 October 1861. He received a good education in his youth that prepared him to become a teacher. He also learned the trades of a printer and a surveyor and how to speak the English language at an early age (see Bitter, “Life Story of Erasmus Peter Marquardson,” 1).

In 1863, he and his family immigrated to the United States. From Liverpool to New York Harbor, they voyaged aboard the BS Kimball. They arrived in the States at the time the Civil War was raging. They quickly departed the northern states by train to Nebraska to avoid physical harm. They then traveled by wagon from Nebraska to Salt Lake City. Erasmus worked as a teamster as they journeyed across the plains (see Bitter, “Life Story of Erasmus Peter Marquardson,” 1).

He and his family settled in Fillmore, Millard County, Utah. In Fillmore and later Scipio, Millard County, Erasmus worked as an editor for the newspaper and taught school. In Scipio he met Nellie Rosenquist. After their meeting, he was ordained a seventy on 6 January 1869 and was endowed on 10 May 1869 in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City. A year later, he and Nellie were sealed in the Endowment House (see Bitter, “Life Story of Erasmus Peter Marquardson,” 2).

Erasmus supported his family by teaching and writing. He and his wife knew much of sadness, as three of their first five children died as infants. Wanting a change, he and his family moved to Richfield, Sevier County (see Bitter, “Life Story of Erasmus Peter Marquardson,” 2).

He was residing in Elsinore, Sevier County, when he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 24 December 1884 and was assigned to labor in the Århus Conference. He was later asked to serve in the Copenhagen Mission Office and in the Copenhagen Branch. After two years of missionary service, Erasmus departed from Copenhagen on 7 October 1886 aboard the steamer Milo with 103 emigrating Latter-day Saints and eight returning missionaries (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 283, 298).

He arrived in Salt Lake City on 1 November 1886. From Salt Lake, he returned to his home in Elsinore. He worked as a farmer and merchandiser in Elsinore. He served as the first counselor in the local bishopric after being ordained a high priest on 11 December 1887 (see Bitter, “Life Story of Erasmus Peter Marquardson,” 4).

In September 1889, he was arrested for unlawful cohabitation. He was sentenced to 120 days in jail and fined fifty-two dollars. After his release, he and his partners purchased the Elsinore Capital Roller Mill. At the time, he was suffering from consumption. He died in 1893 at age forty-eight after being confined to bed for three months because of heart trouble. It was a shock to his family (see Bitter, “Life Story of Erasmus Peter Marquardson,” 5–6).

John Edward Matson

(Johan Edvard Mattsson)

1862–1945

Residence: Burton, Madison Co., Idaho

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 27 May 1892

Missionary labors: Göteborg Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 7 June 1894

Name of departure ship: Bravo

Birth date: 9 March 1862

Birthplace: Trollhättan, Älvsborg, Sweden

Father: Mattsson, Gustaf

Mother: Johansdotter, Britta Maria

Spouse: Kjelin, Anna Mathilda

Marriage date: 8 April 1896

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 6 March 1945

Death place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Burial place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

John’s parents joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Sweden on 2 April 1864, which undoubtedly influenced John’s decision to be baptized on 9 April 1872 in Sweden. His parents and younger brothers and sisters immigrated to the United States in June of 1879, crossing the Atlantic on the ship Wyoming. Twenty years after he was baptized, he received his endowments in the Logan Temple on 29 April 1892 (see FamilySearch). After receiving his endowment, he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 27 May 1892 and was assigned to labor in the Göteborg Conference. After completing an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 7 June 1894 aboard the steamer Bravo with fifty-three emigrating Latter-day Saints and other returning missionaries (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 328–29, 337).

After his arrival in the States, he returned to Idaho. He became a resident of Rexburg, Madison County. He held the position of bishop and ward clerk and served as a member of the high council in the Carbon Stake. He moved to Salt Lake City, where he resided for twenty years. John died in 1945 at his home in Salt Lake City at age eighty-two (see “John Edward Matson,” Deseret News, 7 March 1945).


Peter Matson

(Per Månsson)

1851–1919

Residence: Mount Pleasant, Sanpete Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 20 April 1885

Missionary labors: Skåne Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 30 May 1887

Name of departure ship: Argo

Birth date: 3 March 1851

Birthplace: Rosenhäll, Härslöv, Malmöhus, Sweden

Father: Mattsson, Måns

Mother: Persdotter, Maria

Spouse: Liljidahl, Mathilda

Marriage date: 28 July 1873

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Rosenlund, Mary Maria

Marriage date: 27 December 1877

Death date: 1 March 1919

Death place: Mount Pleasant, Sanpete Co., Utah

Burial place: Mount Pleasant, Sanpete Co., Utah

Peter was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on 22 May 1864 by P. T. Nystrom. He was age thirteen at the time. He was ordained a deacon, a priest, and an elder before being asked to labor as a local missionary. His missionary assignments from 1869 to 1873 included presiding over the Malmö Branch and serving for six months in the province of Blekinge and nine months in Hälsingborg. He also labored in Kristianstad and surrounding districts for six months. These responsibilities were fulfilled in his teenage years (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 161).

In 1873, Peter immigrated to Utah, where he was endowed on 28 July 1873 in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City. He moved to Mount Pleasant, Sanpete County. In that community, he was ordained a seventy on 7 August 1884 (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 161). To support himself and his family, he worked as a shoemaker (see History of Sanpete and Emery Counties, Utah, 258).

In 1885, Peter accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 20 April 1885 and was assigned to be president of the Kristianstad Branch and later president of the Skåne Conference (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 161). After completing an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 30 May 1887 aboard the steamer Argo with 138 emigrating Latter-day Saints and ten other missionaries (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 302).

Returning to Mount Pleasant, Peter continued his work as a shoemaker before opening a creamery. He was secretary, treasurer, and manager of the creamery, which eventually carried dry goods, groceries, boots, shoes, and general merchandise (see History of Sanpete and Emery Counties, Utah, 258).

On 20 May 1890 Peter was ordained a high priest and set apart as first counselor in the bishopric of the Mount Pleasant Ward. In December 1900, when the Sanpete Stake of Zion was divided into two stakes, Peter was chosen on 1 January 1901 to be a counselor to Christian N. Lund, president of the North Sanpete Stake (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 161).

He served as secretary of the Mount Pleasant Electric Light Company and as a member of the city council from 1894 to 1895. He was an ardent Republican (see History of Sanpete and Emery Counties, Utah, 258).

On 14 June 1905, he returned to Copenhagen as president of the Swedish Mission. He served in this assignment until 1908 (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 4:383). After returning to Sanpete, he continued his duties in the stake presidency until being honorably released on 14 September 1914. He then fulfilled an assignment as stake clerk until 1918 (see History of Sanpete and Emery Counties, Utah, 258). Peter died in 1919 in Mount Pleasant at age sixty-seven.

Jonas Mattson

1843–1923

Residence: Salina, Sevier Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 30 April 1889

Missionary labors: Stockholm Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 2 April 1891

Name of departure ship: Volo

Birth date: 15 November 1843

Birthplace: Selbo, Tierp, Uppsala, Sweden

Father: Jönsson, Matts

Mother: Jansdotter, Brita Cajsa

Spouse: Larson, Mariah Cajsa

Marriage date: Before 1870

Marriage place: Sweden

Death date: 13 February 1923

Death place: Salina, Sevier Co., Utah

Burial place: East Side Cemetery, Salina, Sevier Co., Utah

In 1880, Jonas emigrated from Scandinavia to America. Nine years after his arrival and while living in Salina, Sevier County, Utah, he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 30 April 1889 and was assigned to labor in the Stockholm Conference. After completing an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 2 April 1891 aboard the steamer Volo with forty-three emigrating Latter-day Saints and other returning missionaries (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 310, 312, 318).

He returned to Salina, where he served as the first counselor to Bishop James S. Jensen of the Salina Ward. He also served as a ward teacher. From 1901 to 1902, he served as the town president of Salina. His biographer said of him, “He has been a generous giver to the needy and has aided his community in every step of its progress” (“Honored Pioneer Called to Reward,” Salina Sun, 16 February 1923).

Jonas died in 1923 at his home at age seventy-nine. His death was viewed as very sudden. Before medical aid could be summoned, he had died. His funeral services were held in the Salina Second Ward chapel (see “Honored Pioneer Called to Reward,” Salina Sun, 16 February 1923).

Matts Swen Mattson

(Matts Svensson)

1836–1911

Residence: St. Charles, Bear Lake Co., Idaho

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 1 November 1884

Missionary labors: Skåne Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 7 October 1886

Name of departure ship: Milo

Birth date: 12 January 1836

Birthplace: Rippa, Åhus, Kristianstad, Sweden

Father: Mattsson, Sven

Mother: Olsdotter, Hanna

Spouse: Nielsen, Caroline

Marriage date: 4 October 1869

Marriage place: Brigham City, Box Elder Co., Utah

Death date: 8 September 1911

Death place: Blackfoot, Bingham Co., Idaho

Burial place: St. Charles, Bear Lake Co., Idaho

The father of Matts was a gentleman farmer and a member of the Riksdage, the main legislative body in Sweden. In spite of his family’s wealth, Matts served as an apprentice to a dyer for four years, 1852–56. By 1859, he was working in a woolen factory in Lund, Malmöhus, Sweden (see Wahlstrom, “A Brief Story of the Mattson Family,” 1).

It was not until 1865 in Simrishamn, Kristianstad County, that Matts learned of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He accepted the gospel message and was baptized on 26 March 1866 by Andrew J. Miller. He was ordained a priest on 25 August 1866 and an elder on 22 February 1867 by John Fagerberg. Soon after these ordinations, he was called to serve a local mission. He labored in the Lund, Malmöhus, Karlskrona, Blekinge, and Växjö, Kronoberg branches (Malmöhus, Blekinge, and Kronoberg are the respective counties in which the cities of Lund, Karlskrona, and Växjö lie). During this mission, he converted his extended family (see Wahlstrom, “A Brief Story of the Mattson Family,” 2–3).

Matts, along with family members, immigrated to Utah in 1869 and settled in Brigham City, Box Elder County. Soon after his marriage in 1869, Matts and his bride moved to St. Charles, Bear Lake County, Idaho (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 160).

In 1884, Matts accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He was set apart for his mission by Wilford Woodruff and Franklin D. Richards. He arrived in Copenhagen on 1 November 1884 and was assigned to labor in the Skåne Conference. During this mission, he was mobbed in Åbyholm, Sweden, on 8 February 1885 (see Jenson, LDS Church Chronology, 8 February 1885). Circumstances leading to the mobbing began when those who had listened to him preach hurled stones in his direction. After Matts was hit and bleeding, he dabbed some of his blood on a little girl standing nearby. The mob rushed to the little girl to see if she had been hurt, and in the confusion Matts escaped further abuse (see Wahlstrom, “A Brief Story of the Mattson Family,” 3–4).

The mobbing didn’t stop his preaching. Before he left the mission field, he penned, “I spoke in 54 meetings, baptized 8 persons, lodged in 400 different places and traveled 8,000 miles” (Wahlstrom, “A Brief Story of the Mattson Family,” 5). After completing an honorable mission, Matts departed from Copenhagen on 7 October 1886 aboard the steamer Milo with 103 emigrating Latter-day Saints and seven other returning missionaries (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 298).

Aboard ship he met a Swedish girl whom he wished to marry under the law of plural marriage. His first wife would not consent to another wife, so the issue was dropped (see Webb, “History of Matts S. Mattson,” 1). Matts settled into a routine in St. Charles that varied little. He labored as a teacher and a priest for twenty-five years (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 160). His faithful activities also included being a Sunday School librarian and a janitor of the meetinghouse. He collected two thousand dollars for the construction of the Logan Temple and for the Scandinavian Mission building fund (see Wahlstrom, “A Brief Story of the Mattson Family,” 5).

About a year before his death, Matts became very absentminded and often wandered off. Fearful that he would become lost, he was placed in a hospital in Blackfoot, Bingham County, Idaho, where he died in 1911 at age seventy-five (see Webb, “History of Matts S. Mattson,” 1).

Christian Meyer

1845–1919

Residence: Vermillion, Sevier Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 14 November 1890

Missionary labors: Stockholm and Århus conferences (Germany and Switzerland)

Departure date from Copenhagen: 22 September 1892

Birth date: 1 November 1845

Birthplace: Åbenrå, Åbenrå, Denmark

Father: Meyer, Christian

Mother: Hintz, Margaretha Christine

Spouse: Peterson, Ingrid Jenson

Marriage date: 22 November 1874

Marriage place: Vamdrup, Ribe, Denmark

Spouse: Nielsen (Anderson), Elise Jorgine

Marriage date: 23 September 1896

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 27 August 1919

Death place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Burial place: Sigurd, Sevier Co., Utah

On 28 February 1877, Christian was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He soon immigrated to the United States to join Latter-day Saints residing in Utah. He settled in Sigurd, Sevier County, in 1879. He was endowed on 6 December 1882 in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City. Two years later, he was ordained a seventy on 12 October 1884 by Jens F. Mortenson (see Warnock, Memories of Sevier Stake, 361).

While a resident of Vermillion, Sevier County, Christian accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1890. He arrived in Copenhagen on 14 November 1890 and was assigned to labor in the Stockholm Conference. During this mission, he also labored in Germany, Switzerland, and the Århus Conference before departing from Copenhagen on 22 September 1892 with twenty-one emigrating Latter-day Saints. He was one of three returning missionaries aboard the steamer sharing the responsibility of the safety and comfort of the Saints (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 317, 326).

On 25 June 1893, seventies residing in the Sevier County towns of Salina, Redmond, Aurora, and Vermillion, Sevier County, were organized into the 107th Quorum of the Seventy. Christian was called to be a president of that quorum. From 1895 to 1902, he served as second counselor to Bishop John Dåstrup of the Sigurd Ward. From 1889 to 1901, he was superintendent of the local Sunday School. It was said of him, “His Sunday School members loved him” (Warnock, Memories of Sevier Stake, 361). Christian died in 1919 in Salt Lake City at age seventy-three.

Andrew Niels Michaelsen

(Anders Marius Nielsen)

1850–89

Residence: Mayfield, Sanpete Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 28 September 1886

Missionary labors: Copenhagen Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 19 July 1888

Name of departure ship: Cato

Birth date: 22 November 1850

Birthplace: Dyrehavegård, Lyngby, Copenhagen, Denmark

Father: Nielsen, Jens Michael

Mother: Andersen, Martha

Spouse: Anderson, Sarah Christina

Marriage date: 7 December 1874

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 20 August 1889

Death place: Mayfield, Sanpete Co., Utah

Andrew was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on 18 October 1864 in Copenhagen before immigrating to America and settling in Utah. It was five years after his arrival in the Salt Lake Valley that he was endowed on 27 September 1869 in the Endowment House (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 165).

He settled in Gunnison, Sanpete County, where he was ordained an elder in 1869 by Alonzo L. Raleigh. He was ordained a seventy in 1884 by Carl Olson. Two years after this ordination, he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia. He arrived in Copenhagen on 28 September 1886 and was assigned to labor in the Copenhagen Conference—principally on the islands of Lolland and Falster in Maribo County (see Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 165; Michaelsen Diary, 1887–1888; Bitton, Guide Mormon Diaries and Autobiographies, 239).

While serving in these isles, he wrote a diary. Most of his diary entries are of weather patterns, travels, and gospel conversations. One conversation tells of explaining that “the Lord had preserved the holy writings found in the Bible, which should be our guide,” and of one man becoming angry and “wished to hear no more.” Andrew also wrote of becoming ill on his mission, “I still feel sick, believe it to be chills and fever.” His last entry was, “Got letter from home” (Diary of Andrew Niels Michaelsen, 1887–1888; Bitton, Guide Mormon Diaries and Autobiographies, 239).

After completing an honorable mission, Andrew departed from Copenhagen on 19 July 1888 aboard the steamer Cato with 113 emigrating Latter-day Saints and 3 other returning missionaries (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 299–300, 306). One year later he died in Mayfield, Sanpete County, Utah, at age thirty-eight.


Peter Mickelson

(Peder Andersen)

1837–1924

Residence: Manti, Sanpete Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 6 May 1884

Missionary labors: Copenhagen Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 6 June 1884

Name of departure ship: Panther

Birth date: 19 April 1837

Birthplace: Ønslev, Maribo, Denmark

Father: Mikklesen, Andreas

Mother: Pedersdatter, Karen

Spouse: Jenson, Maria Christina Rath

Marriage date: 24 November 1866

Marriage place: Manti, Sanpete Co., Utah

Death date: 5 March 1924

Death place: Ephraim, Sanpete Co., Utah

Burial place: Manti, Sanpete Co., Utah

Peter was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints by P. C. Nielsen on 28 March 1862. He immigrated to America in 1863 and settled in Manti, Sanpete County, Utah. While residing in that small community, he met Maria Rath, who had married Louis (Lars) Jensen and was the mother of four children. Soon after his arrival in Manti, Maria became a widow. Peter, a bachelor, offered to marry Maria and move her family to a larger home. She accepted his offer (see correspondence from Diana Rasmussen, 26 November 2001).

Peter accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1884. He arrived in Copenhagen on 6 May 1884 and was assigned to labor in the Copenhagen Conference. Due to poor health, he departed from Copenhagen one month later. He accompanied seventy-one emigrating Latter-day Saints and other returning missionaries aboard the steamer Panther (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 279, 282–83).

Family tradition says that one reason for his early departure was that as a baby he was accidentally dropped by his mother, which resulted in one leg being shorter than the other (see correspondence from Diana Rasmussen, 26 November 2001). He was an active Church worker and assisted in the building of two temples, one in Manti and the other in St. George. He was a member of Westenskow brass and string band. He died at the home of his daughter, Christine Anderson, in Ephraim on 5 March 1924 of a stroke. He was eighty-seven.


Niels Thorup Mikkelson

(Niels Mikkelsen)

1850–1926

Residence: Fountain Green, Sanpete Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 1 December 1885

Missionary labors: Århus and Ålborg conferences

Departure date from Copenhagen: 29 September 1887

Name of departure ship: Bravo

Birth date: 31 January 1850

Birthplace: Thaarup, Sønder Vinge, Viborg, Denmark

Father: Villumsen, Mikkel

Mother: Jensdatter, Maren

Spouse: Nielsen, Dorothea (Diantha) Marie

Marriage date: 11 August 1881

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 15 February 1926

Death place: Fountain Green, Sanpete Co., Utah

Burial place: Fountain Green Cemetery, Fountain Green, Sanpete Co., Utah

Niels was the fifth child of a poor family living in Denmark. At age nine he left home seeking employment. For four years he labored at various jobs and received little pay. At age fourteen, he was confirmed a member of the Lutheran Church. At age twenty-two, he enlisted in the Danish army as a dragoon. He served in the military from 25 January 1872 to 28 September 1873. For the next three years, he was employed by a pharmacist. Niels then moved to Skaføgård, where he became an overseer of stables and head coachman for Prime Minister Estrup from July 1876 to November 1879 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 294).

While in the employ of the prime minister, he was baptized into The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on 8 June 1879 at Randers, Denmark. Soon after his baptism, he was invited to serve a local mission. To accept this assignment, he had to leave his employ. The prime minister offered him land and horses if he would remain his coachman, but Niels refused (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 294).

After being ordained a priest by Niels Wilhelmsen, he labored as a local missionary from November 1879 to June 1881. He then immigrated to the Salt Lake Valley, arriving in July 1881 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 294). Niels received his endowment on 11 August 1881 in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City.

He then settled in Fountain Green, Sanpete County, Utah. It was while in Fountain Green that he accepted yet another mission call to Denmark. Upon arrival in Copenhagen on 1 December 1885, Niels was appointed to labor in the Århus Conference. However, before his mission ended he was serving as president of the Ålborg Conference. After completing an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 29 September 1887 aboard the steamer Bravo with eighty-eight emigrating Latter-day Saints and other elders (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 295, 303).

He fulfilled a third mission to Scandinavia from 1903 to 1905, laboring in Ålborg, Århus, Vejle, and Randers. During these three missions, he baptized approximately twenty converts. Of great importance to Niels was the baptism of two of his brothers and one sister, who not only received the gospel but also immigrated to Utah (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 294).

During the last years of his life, Niels had “temple work uppermost in his mind” (Mikkelson, “Biographical Sketch of Brother Niels Mikkelson,” 2). He died in 1926 in Fountain Green at age seventy-six—”an active and faithful member of the Fountain Green Ward” (Lund, Scandinavian Jubilee Album, 166).


Hans Peter Miller

1865–1945

Residence: Richfield, Sevier Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 27 May 1889

Missionary labors: Copenhagen and Ålborg conferences

Departure date from Copenhagen: 14 May 1891

Name of departure ship: Volo

Birth date: 3 April 1865

Birthplace: Richfield, Sevier Co., Utah

Father: Møller (Miller), Hans Peter Hansen

Mother: Larsen, Caroline Margrethe (Margaret) Christina

Spouse: Christensen, Emma Annette Agnes

Marriage date: 14 November 1883

Marriage place: St. George Temple, St. George, Washington Co., Utah

Spouse: Lazenby, Sarah Ann

Marriage date: 26 June 1907

Marriage place: Manti Temple, Manti, Sanpete Co., Utah

Death date: 9 November 1945

Death place: Venice, Sevier Co., Utah

Burial place: Richfield Cemetery, Richfield, Sevier Co., Utah

When Hans was a baby, his parents were advised to leave Richfield, Sevier County, due to Indian problems. They took their children to Mount Pleasant, Sanpete County, where they remained for six years. In Mount Pleasant, Hans received a serious head blow from an awl, resulting in a speech impediment “which [was] a great trial and drawback to me,” wrote Hans. This was just one of a series of childhood accidents that he experienced (see Miller, “Record of the Life of Hans Peter Miller,” 1).

He and his family returned to Richfield in 1871 (see Miller, “Record of the Life of Hans Peter Miller,” 1). Hans was baptized on 5 October 1873 in that community by Jorgen Smith. In 1875, he received his patriarchal blessing, which told him, “Thou shalt have a numerous posterity” (Washburn, “Hans Peter Miller, 1865–1945,” 36). He was endowed on 23 June 1880 in the St. George Temple and married three years later in the same temple.

Hans accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1889, leaving behind his wife and two small daughters. His first son was born the day he docked in Liverpool (see Miller, “Record of the Life of Hans Peter Miller,” 3). He arrived in Copenhagen on 27 May 1889 and was assigned to labor in the Copenhagen and Ålborg conferences. Although his preaching was successful, he did not baptize one person. After completing an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 14 May 1891 aboard the steamer Volo with twenty-four emigrating Latter-day Saints and other returning missionaries bound for England (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 310, 313, 318). At Liverpool, England, he boarded the Wisconsin, which arrived in New York Harbor on 3 June 1891 (see Washburn, “Hans Peter Miller, 1865–1945,” 36).

During his absence in Europe, his father built him a house. He and his family lived in the home during the winter months. They lived on the farm the summer months (see Miller, “Record of the Life of Hans Peter Miller,” 3).

In 1928, Hans was thrown out the back of a truck. He was rushed to the LDS Hospital in Salt Lake City, where they discovered that he had fractured his head and nearly broken his neck. “This made it impossible for me to turn my head or look up without becoming dizzy,” he wrote. This condition lasted almost five years. He viewed the acceptance of his son’s mission call to Germany as what healed his chronic dizziness. He said that when his son was set apart by Elder George Albert Smith, he was told, “Young man, you are worrying about something at home. Don’t worry any more, everything at home is alright” (Miller, “Record of the Life of Hans Peter Miller,” 2). He said that prophetic announcement was given at the same time his health was restored.

In his later years, Hans did much temple work for the dead in the St. George Temple (see Miller “Record of the Life of Hans Peter Miller,” 2). However, after reviewing the Venice Ward records, it appears that “he never held a position or talked in a church meeting.” His daughter said, “Papa was too bashful to talk in public” (Washburn, “Hans Peter Miller, 1865–1945,” 36). After a long illness, Hans died in 1945 at his home in Venice, Sevier County, at age eighty.

Lars Christian Miller

(Lars Christian Møller)

1851–1931

Residence: Newton, Cache Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 18 September 1891

Missionary labors: North Schleswig, Germany; Århus Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 8 June 1893

Name of departure ship: Bravo

Birth date: 10 February 1851

Birthplace: Skovminde, Højslev, Viborg, Denmark

Father: Møller, Christian Larsen

Mother: Jensdatter, Dorthea

Spouse: Petersen, Cathinca Theresa Bolette

Marriage date: 11 October 1878

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Hansen, Lena Johanne

Marriage date: 12 January 1887

Marriage place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Death date: 19 January 1931

Death place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Burial place: Newton, Cache Co., Utah

Lars’s education was limited to studying books at home. He became familiar with milling, masonry, carpentry, harness making, and farming through laboring in these occupations. He was apprenticed to a rock mason and a shoemaker before being inducted into the Danish navy as a sailor. “The noise of the guns and the roaring of the sea developed a roaring sound in his ears which never left him and at times was very annoying,” he penned (“Lars Christian Miller,” 1). He sailed over much of the world on the Otto Volmer. Seeing America “changed his ideas and dreams for the future. He set his heart on someday coming to this land of opportunity,” wrote his biographer (Christensen, “The History of the Lars Christian Miller Family,” 1).

Lars became a convert to Mormonism and was baptized on 25 March 1876 by Theodore Christensen. The most difficult obstacle he faced after his baptism was ending his habit of chewing tobacco. He came with his family to America in 1877 and arrived in Salt Lake City on 5 October 1877. He settled in Logan, Cache County, Utah, where he worked on the Utah Northern Railroad and did masonry work (see “Lars Christian Miller,” 1).

After his marriage to Theresa Petersen, he obtained land on the flood plain of the Logan River. From there, he and his wife moved to Newton, Cache County, where Lars purchased ranch land and forty acres of farmland. He was reported to be the best gardener in Newton (see Christensen, “The History of the Lars Christian Miller Family,” 3).

While residing in that community, he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1891. He arrived in Copenhagen on 18 September 1891 and was assigned to labor in the Århus Conference. In January 1892, he walked to Christiansfeld, Hadersleben, Schelswig-Holstein, Germany, a locale about twenty-two miles across the national border line. Finding no one willing to show him hospitality, he stayed in a hotel for the night. He had the same experience in Haderslev County (then in Schelswig-Holstein, Germany) and so he returned to Fredericia, Vejle County, Denmark (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 320, 322). On this mission, he acquired family names that later became the source of much temple work (see “Daybook of Alder L. C. Moller, Mission to Denmark, 1891–93”). After completing an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 8 June 1893 aboard the steamer Bravo with a few returning missionaries and 105 emigrating Latter-day Saints (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 332).

Returning to Newton, he served as a ward librarian for twenty years. His family reported, “He read his Bible every night and he read till sleep and tiredness won out.” Lars became ill in December 1930. He was taken to the William Budge Memorial Hospital in Logan, Cache County, where he suffered intensely for three weeks before his death in 1931 at age seventy-nine (see “Lars Christian Miller,” 1).


Christian Hans Monson

(Christen Hansen)

1837–96

Residence: Richmond, Cache Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 20 November 1878

Missionary labors: Göteborg Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 5 July 1880

Name of departure ship: Cato

Birth date: 16 June 1837

Birthplace: Stora Boeplads, Tune, Østfold, Norway

Father: Monsen, Hans

Mother: Nielsdatter, Berte

Spouse: Kruetzback (Kredsbank), Nielsene Olsen

Marriage date: 29 June 1858

Marriage place: Lehi, Utah Co., Utah

Spouse: Peterson, Anna Catherine

Marriage date: 26 April 1861

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Mansson, Ellen Persson

Marriage date: 16 March 1867

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Olsen, Karen Maria

Marriage date: 2 May 1870

Spouse: Jenson, Elna (Ella)

Marriage date: 5 January 1874

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Jacobsson, Wendla (Vendla)

Marriage date 15 March 1883

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 23 September 1896

Death place: Richmond, Cache Co., Utah

Burial place: Richmond, Cache Co., Utah

Christian’s father was a woodcutter by trade. He was industrious and hardworking, and he expected everyone around him to be the same. He had a violent temper, and Christian recalled being “mortally afraid” of his walking cane. However, when he was in good humor, Christian enjoyed sitting and talking to him as he smoked his long-stemmed pipe (see Skidmore, “Biographical Sketch of the Life of My Father Christian Hans Monson as I Knew Him,” 1).

Christian was baptized on 4 April 1853 by Svend Larsen. At the time, he was an employee of the Fredrikstad prison. He recalled carrying meals to the elders who were imprisoned for preaching. In this process, an elder asked him why he abused and tormented him, for “so persecuted they the Christ and his followers.” The prisoners set Christian to thinking. One night during the winter of 1852, he released his prisoners. Together they walked to the fjord, where Christian was secretly baptized, after which the elders returned to their prison cell (see Skidmore, “Biographical Sketch of the Life of my Father Christian Hans Monson as I Knew Him,” 2; Skidmore and Horne, “Immigrant Pioneers: Christian Hans Monson,” Daughters of Utah Pioneers, Lesson for October 1984, 41–53; Roberts, “Love Is Its own Reward,” New Era, February 1978, 6–7).

Christian was whipped by his father for being baptized and told never to return. He left home and labored as a local missionary in Drammen, Buskerud County, Norway. At that time, he was five feet nine inches and weighed 190 pounds. He had blue eyes, a fair complexion, brown hair, and a beard (see Skidmore and Horne, “Immigrant Pioneers: Christian Hans Monson,” Daughters of Utah Pioneers, Lesson for October 1984, 41–44).

He was ordained an elder on 8 September 1856. He began his emigration to America on 9 August 1857. He voyaged from Liverpool to the United States aboard the Westmoreland. He crossed the plains in the Christian Christiansen handcart company to reach the Salt Lake Valley (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 236). Christian settled in Lehi, Utah County, before moving to Logan, Cache County, and finally Richmond, Cache County. He was called from Richmond to serve as a guard in Echo Canyon during the Utah War (see Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, 1042). After the threat of war passed, he was endowed on 26 October 1861 in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City.

He married Nielsine Kruetzback, a widow fourteen years his senior. This marriage ended in divorce. After the divorce, Christian accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1878. He arrived in Copenhagen on 20 November 1878 and was assigned to labor in the Göteborg Conference. After completing an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 5 July 1880 aboard the steamer Cato with 346 emigrating Latter-day Saints and other returning missionaries (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 243).

On 23 June 1888, the First District Court of Ogden sentenced Christian to six months’ imprisonment and a one-hundred-dollar fine for unlawful cohabitation. He was discharged from the penitentiary on 23 December 1888 (see Jenson, LDS Church Chronology, June 23, 1888; December 23, 1888).

After his discharge, he served as president of the Thirty-ninth Quorum of the Seventy and as a temple worker in St. George. He is remembered as being a pioneer builder and lumberman. He is credited with assisting in the construction of the Salt Lake, St. George, Manti, and Logan Temples (see Skidmore and Horne, “Immigrant Pioneers: Christian Hans Monson,” Daughters of Utah Pioneers, Lesson for October, 1984, 49–50).

In his later years, he moved to Franklin County, Idaho, where he set up a lumber mill. He operated the mill until his health failed. Christian died in 1896 from jaundice and gallstones in Richmond at age fifty-nine (see Skidmore and Horne, “Immigrant Pioneers: Christian Hans Monson,” Daughters of Utah Pioneers, Lesson for October 1984, 51).

Jeppa Monson

(Jeppa Månsson)

1842–1939

Residence: St. Charles, Bear Lake Co., Idaho

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 12 September 1882

Missionary labors: Göteborg and Skåne conferences

Departure date from Copenhagen: 9 June 1884

Name of departure ship: Milo

Birth date: 17 December 1842

Birthplace: Bästekille #4, Södra Mellby, Kristianstad, Sweden

Father: Jeppsson, Måns

Mother: Rasmusdotter, Elgena

Spouse: Mattson, Nellie (Nilla)

Marriage date: 30 October 1871

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Olson, Augusta

Marriage date: 26 August 1926

Death date: 1 October 1939

Death place: Smithfield, Cache Co., Utah

Burial place: Smithfield, Cache Co., Utah

Jeppa was an only child. His mother died when he was seventeen months old. As a child and youth, he attended common schools near his home and assisted his father as a farm laborer. By age twenty-four he was self-employed, working on a number of farms. It was after becoming acquainted with his future bride that he learned of Mormonism. It is likely while visiting in the Mattsson home, Jeppa became interested in the gospel (see Eberling, “Life Histories of Jeppa and Nellie Marie Monson,” 1).

He was baptized on 15 September 1870 by Anders Berlin. He was the only one of his family to join The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He immigrated to Utah in 1871 with the Mattsson family. He and Nellie Mattsson were endowed and sealed for eternity on 30 October 1871 by Joseph F. Smith (see Eberling, “Life Histories of Jeppa and Nellie Marie Monson,” 2; FamilySearch).

They settled in St. Charles, Bear Lake County, Idaho, where they purchased twenty acres of farmland for $12.50. Jeppa built a one-room home on their property. He became a successful farmer and stock raiser in the Bear Lake Valley (see Eberling, “Life Histories of Jeppa and Nellie Marie Monson,” 2–3).

After eleven years of residency in the United States, he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1882. He was set apart for this mission by Joseph F. Smith. He arrived in Copenhagen on 12 September 1882 and was assigned to labor in the Göteborg Conference and later the Skåne Conference. After completing this mission, Jeppa departed from Copenhagen on 9 June 1884 aboard the steamer Milo with 531 emigrating Latter-day Saints and 24 other missionaries (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 279).

Returning to St. Charles, he was asked to serve as president of the Fourth Quorum of Elders until 18 July 1886 when he was ordained a seventy by Mosiah Booth. After this ordination, he returned to Scandinavia to serve another missionary assignment. He was set apart by Heber J. Grant on 5 August 1898 for this mission. He arrived in Copenhagen on 28 August 1898 and was appointed to labor in the Skåne Conference. He departed from Copenhagen on 22 July 1900 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 367, 369, 380).

Returning again to St. Charles, he was called to be a president of the Sixth Quorum of the Seventy. Then on 8 February 1904, he was ordained a high priest and set apart as a member of the high council of the Bear Lake Stake (see Eberling, “Life Histories of Jeppa and Nellie Marie Monson,” 6). Jeppa resided in St. Charles for nearly forty-four years before moving to Smithfield, Cache County, Utah, in 1915 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 268). One reason for the move was to live near the Logan Temple. He is remembered as one of the contributors to improving the Logan Tabernacle and building the Logan Third Ward chapel. He was proud of the honor of being the oldest resident of Smithfield. After breaking his hip, Jeppa died in 1939 in Smithfield at age ninety-six (see Eberling, “Life Histories of Jeppa and Nellie Marie Monson,” 7).


Mons Monson

(Möns Bengtsson)

1850–1910

Residence: Moroni, Sanpete Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 7 November 1883

Missionary labors: Stockholm Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 20 August 1885

Name of departure ship: Cato

Birth date: 18 March 1850

Birthplace: Lund Stadsförsamling, Malmöhus, Sweden

Father: Monsson, Bengt

Mother: Petersdotter, Anna

Spouse: Syme, Janet

Marriage date: 6 November 1872

Marriage place: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 18 April 1910

Death place: Moroni, Sanpete Co., Utah

Burial place: Moroni, Sanpete Co., Utah

Mons came with his family to America in 1854. For a time, they resided in Keokuk, Lee County, Iowa, before crossing the plains to Utah. The family located in Spanish Fork, Utah County. By fall 1860, they had moved to Moroni, Sanpete County, where they resided on a small farm that consisted of twenty-five acres (History of Sanpete and Emery Counties, Utah, 423). It was in Moroni that Mons was baptized on 7 June 1861 (see FamilySearch).

In his youth, he learned the trade of cabinetmaking, and through his industry acquired a two-hundred-acre farm about three miles outside of town and a fine residence in the city. Although he helped establish a Mormon colony in Arizona in 1876, he had returned to Moroni by 1883 (History of Sanpete and Emery Counties, Utah, 423). While residing in the community once again, he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1883. He arrived in Copenhagen on 7 November 1883 and was assigned to labor in the Stockholm Conference. He labored in Sweden and northern Finland. After completing an honorable mission, Mons departed from Copenhagen on 20 August 1885 aboard the steamer Cato (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 274, 291).

Returning to the states, he became active in politics, serving as chairman of the Democratic Party in Moroni for three years. He held the office of constable, justice of the peace, and mayor of the city at various times in his life. In November 1896, he was elected treasurer of Sanpete County (History of Sanpete and Emery Counties, Utah, 424).

Mons is remembered as contributing three thousand dollars towards the building of an opera house in Moroni. The building seated five hundred people. Many traveling stock companies presented plays on the stage of the opera house. The building was also used for political rallies, public meetings, and Church events. It was considered one of the most popular and beautiful theaters in Southern Utah (see Carter, Our Pioneer Heritage, 8:476). Mons died in 1910 in Moroni at age sixty.

Nils Monson

1867–1938

Residence: Pleasant Grove, Utah Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 5 November 1892

Missionary labors: Skåne Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 20 September 1894

Name of departure ship: Thorsa

Birth date: 12 February 1867

Birthplace: Boke, Vittskövle, Kristianstad, Sweden

Father: Jönsson, Mons

Mother: Lundgren, Botilla Larsdotter

Spouse: Söderberg, Agnes Charlotte

Marriage date: 25 March 1897

Marriage place: Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 26 August 1938

Death place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Burial place: Pleasant Grove, Utah Co., Utah

At age thirteen Nils immigrated to America with his parents. While a resident of Pleasant Grove, Utah County, Utah, he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1892. He arrived in Copenhagen on 5 November 1892 and was assigned to labor in the Skåne Conference. In that conference, he worked with his brother Olof for four months. The brothers enjoyed visiting relatives, especially their uncle Bengt Jonsson. Uncles, aunts, and cousins welcomed them and were receptive to their message but did not join the Church. After completing an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 20 September 1894 aboard the steamer Thorsa with 31 emigrating Latter-day Saints and 2 returning missionaries (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 328–29, 337).

While residing in East Jordan, Salt Lake County, Nils accepted a second mission call to Scandinavia in 1898. He arrived in Copenhagen on 16 May 1898. After two years of missionary service, he departed from Copenhagen bound for America on 2 July 1900 (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 367, 380).

Upon returning to the states, Nils purchased a farm and home in the Manila Ward. For a time, he and his family lived in Box Elder County. Then, they moved to Manila, Daggett County. He built a home, planted his acreage in fruit, and along with other family members, became an orchardist. He hired many of the youth in Manila to pick berries. Although this was a more prosperous time in his life, he and his wife separated (see Olsen, The Call of Zion, 56–58).

He was ordained a high priest before his death. He died in 1938 at his home in Salt Lake City of an internal hemorrhage at age seventy-one. Funeral services were held in the Manila chapel (see “Niels Monson,” Deseret News, 29 August 1938). He died intestate, leaving property valued at $2,400 (see Olsen, The Call of Zion, 56–58).


Olof Monson

(Ola Månsson)

1857–1940

Residence: Pleasant Grove, Utah Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 1 November 1891

Missionary labors: Skåne Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 8 June 1893

Name of departure ship: Bravo

Birth date: 6 April 1857

Birthplace: Olseröd, Maglehem, Kristianstad, Sweden

Father: Jönsson, Måns

Mother: Larsdotter, Botilla

Spouse: Jacobsen, Johanna Hannah

Marriage date: 24 December 1885

Marriage place: Pleasant Grove, Utah Co., Utah

Spouse: Gardelius, Alfrida Anna Charlotta

Marriage date: 1 April 1896

Death date: 19 January 1940

Death place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Burial place: Pleasant Grove, Utah Co., Utah

Olof was baptized a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Malmö, Sweden, on 19 May 1875 by P. Frojd. The branch records indicate he emigrated the next year, leaving for America on 7 September 1876 (Malmö Branch Records 0082942 Item 3, Book 1678, entries 82–D and 222–C).

He was a resident of Pleasant Grove, Utah County, Utah, when he accepted a mission call to Scandinavia in 1891. He arrived in Copenhagen on 1 November 1891 and was assigned to labor in the Skåne Conference. After completing an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 8 June 1893 aboard the steamer Bravo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 460, 483).

On 14 August 1912 Olof arrived in Sweden to serve a second mission. From 1913 to 1914, he was president of the Skåne Conference (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 460, 483). His final mission was served in the Pacific Northwest. He died in 1940 at his temporary residence, 717 East First South Street, in Salt Lake City at age 82 (“Olof Monson,” Deseret News, 20 January 1940).


Christian J. Mortensen

(Christian Jørgensen)

1860–1937

Residence: Salina, Sevier Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 30 April 1889

Missionary labors: Ålborg Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 17 October 1889

Name of departure ship: Cameo

Birth date: 29 January 1860

Birthplace: Emb, Hjørring, Denmark

Father: Jørgensen, Niels Peter

Mother: Hansdatter, Mette Marie

Spouse: Dåstrup, Emiline

Marriage date: 26 January 1887

Marriage place: St George Temple, St. George, Washington Co., Utah

Death date: 27 December 1937

Death place: Salina, Sevier Co., Utah

Christian immigrated with his stepfather and mother to Utah. He attended the Brigham Young Academy before teaching school in Richfield, Cache County, Utah. Due to his stepfather’s death in 1886, he was forced to leave teaching and take over the family farm to support his younger brothers and sisters (see Warnock, Memories of Sevier Stake, 471)

On 19 October 1884 he was ordained a seventy and on 21 February 1885 set apart as a president of the Thirty-sixth Quorum of the Seventy (see Warnock, Memories of Sevier Stake, 123). He left this position to accept a mission call to Scandinavia in 1889. He arrived in Copenhagen on 30 April 1889 and was assigned to labor in the Ålborg Conference. After completing a brief mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 17 October 1889 aboard the steamer Cameo (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 310–12).

On 25 June 1893 when ordained seventies in the Sevier County towns of Salina, Redmond, Aurora, and Vermillion were organized into the 107th Quorum of the Seventy, Christian was called to join them (see Jenson, Church Chronology, June 25, 1893). He was ordained a high priest on 8 December 1907 by David O. McKay (see Warnock, Memories of Sevier Stake, 471). He died in 1937 in Salina, Sevier County, at age seventy-two.


Ephraim Jorgen Mortensen

1860–1949

Residence: Sanford, Conejos Co., Colorado

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 14 June 1887

Missionary labors: Copenhagen Conference (finished his mission in England)

Birthdate: 22 April 1860

Birth place: Parowan, Iron Co., Utah

Father: Mortensen, Anders J.

Mother: Anderson, Christine

Spouse: Jones, Elizabeth Ann

Marriage date: 2 June 1880

Marriage place: St. George, Washington Co., Utah

Death date: 19 March 1949

Death place: Mesa, Maricopa Co., Arizona

Burial place: Mesa, Maricopa Co., Arizona

Ephraim was baptized by John Eyre on 8 March 1868. He was ordained a deacon at about age fourteen. He engaged in farming and raising sheep. On occasion he did some freighting to the mining camps.

On 2 June 1880, Ephraim was married to Elizabeth Ann Jones in the St. George Temple. On 22 April 1884, the family decided to move to Colorado. Accompanied by Anders Mortensen, William H. Lyman, and William C. McGregor, all of Parowan, Joseph Barton of Paragonah, and Joseph Smith of Cedar City, they departed by way of Fremont Pass over the mountains to the Sevier River. They then went to the East Fork of the Sevier River, through Grass Valley, to Dirty Devil Creek and then crossed the Colorado River at Halls Ferry on a small ferryboat just large enough for one wagon and four horses. After crossing the Colorado River, they proceeded to Bluff City. The journey was completed in about three weeks. They remained at Bluff City for one month due to high water and on about 15 June started for the San Luis Valley. Due to the high water, many bridges had been washed out. They finally reached Manassa on July 4th and stayed there until fall. His family then went to Richfield, where they built a small log house. In the winter of 1885, they moved to Sanford, where they built the third house in that town.

In the early spring, Ephraim received a mission call. He departed on 23 May 1887, the first missionary to leave from Sanford. He labored in Copenhagen for about four months and was then transferred to the Newcastle Conference in England. He received a release from his mission on 25 May 1889. He spent a few days visiting Saints and friends and made a trip to Manchester, his wife’s birthplace. He finally left Liverpool on the steamer Wisconsin on 23 June 1887 and arrived home in Sanford on 12 July.

In the spring of 1888, the family moved the Eastdale, Costilla County, Colorado. There he served as first assistant in the Sunday School presidency, second counselor in the bishopric, alternate member of the high council, and superintendent of the Eastdale Sunday School presidency.

In 1908, the town and all the land were sold to the Grant Company. The family moved to Sanford and then on 19 May 1911 moved to Mesa, Arizona, and started a dairy business. In 1916, he bought a retail milk route and moved to Phoenix and then back to Mesa in 1920, where he farmed for two years and then worked on the temple as the building project began. During his later years, Ephraim worked as a janitor at the Mesa First Ward Chapel and did temple work. He died in 1949 in Mesa at eighty-eight.


Lars Mortensen

(Lars Morten Andersen)

1831–1912

Residence: Brigham City, Box Elder Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 7 December 1881

Missionary labors: Copenhagen Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 11 May 1883

Name of departure ship: Bravo

Birth date: 29 December 1831

Birthplace: Melby, Frederiksborg, Denmark

Father: Mortensen, Anders

Mother: Olsdatter, Dorthe

Spouse: Olsen, Mary (Marie) Madsen

Marriage date: 23 September 1861

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Spouse: Jensen, Susannah Mary

Marriage date: 15 December 1873

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 25 March 1912

Death place: Brigham City, Box Elder Co., Utah

Burial place: Brigham City Cemetery, Brigham City, Box Elder Co., Utah

In his youth Lars learned the trade of blacksmithing. He gained employment in a foundry or steel mill called Valse Varket. When he was baptized on 6 June 1858 by Rasmus Jensen, fellow employees ridiculed him. Determined to leave the hecklers, he and his widowed mother and a company of Scandinavian Latter-day Saints, numbering 565, crossed the North Sea in a steamer on 13 May 1861. They docked at Grimsby, England, until they were able to board a train bound for Liverpool. At Liverpool they boarded the Monarch of the Sea and crossed the Atlantic Ocean (see Wagstaff, “Lars Mortensen,” 1; Mortensen, “Lars Anderson Mortensen (1831–1912), Danish Emigrant of 1861,” 1).

Lars and his mother were welcomed in New York Harbor by Elder Erastus Snow. They then journeyed by rail to Nebraska and walked most of the way from Florence, Douglas County, Nebraska, to the Salt Lake Valley (see Wagstaff, “Lars Mortensen,” 2; Mortensen, “Lars Anderson Mortensen (1831–1912), Danish Emigrant of 1861,” 1).

By the time they reached Salt Lake City, Lars was suffering from mountain fever. After his recovery, he married and established a home in Brigham City, Box Elder County. He worked in the co-op blacksmith shop until the cooperative plan was discontinued. He then acquired the shop equipment and opened a new business called Mortensen and Olsen. Lars Olsen was his partner in the business. After a few years, the partnership was dissolved, and Lars worked the shop alone (see Mortensen, “Lars Anderson Mortensen (1831–1912), Danish Emigrant of 1861,” 2)

Needing diversion, he played in the Brigham City Brass Band. His instrument rested on his left shoulder and wound around his body down to his waist on the right side, with a great bell above his head. In addition to playing with the band, Lars enjoyed being an inventor. He invented a nail cutting and a one horsepower machine. But inventions aside, he was considered a “first-class locksmith, blacksmith and wheelwright” (Mortensen, “Lars Anderson Mortensen (1831–1912), Danish Emigrant of 1861,” 2–3).

He interrupted his professions to accept a mission call to Scandinavia. He sailed across the Atlantic on the steamer Nevada and arrived in Copenhagen on 7 December 1881. There he was assigned to labor in the Copenhagen Conference, where he baptized seven converts. During this mission, one of his sons died. He was offered a release at the time, but “preferred [to] stay and finish his mission” (Mortensen, “A Brief History of the Life of Lars Mortensen, Senior,” 3). He visited the old foundry where he had worked in his youth, and was once again offered a position.

He kept a very terse account of his daily missionary labors. A typical account reads, “In Copenhagen for meeting. I spoke. The emigrants left” (Mortensen, “Lars Mortensen’s Mission, November 15, 1881–June 3, 1883”). After completing an honorable mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 11 May 1883 aboard the steamer Bravo with 12 emigrating Latter-day Saints and four other missionaries (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, p. 269). A son wrote of him, “When he left home for his mission his hair was heavy, curly and black. But when he returned [he was only in his fifty-second year] it had turned completely white” (Mortensen, “Lars Anderson Mortensen (1831–1912), Danish Emigrant of 1861,” 4).

Upon returning to the states, on 17 December 1887, the First District Court of Ogden sentenced him to four months’ imprisonment and to pay a $150 fine for unlawful cohabitation. During his confinement, he was allowed to work his blacksmith trade (see Mortensen, “Lars Anderson Mortensen (1831–1912), Danish Emigrant of 1861,” 4–5). He was discharged from the penitentiary on 28 April 1888 (see Jenson, Church Chronology, 17 December 1887; April 28, 1888).

The remainder of his life was spent working on a little farm and in his shop. In the winter of 1911–12, he contracted heart problems. Lars died in 1912 at Brigham City at age eighty. In his obituary, it was said of him, “He owed no man a dollar when he quit his life” (Mortensen, “Lars Anderson Mortensen (1831–1912), Danish Emigrant of 1861,” 5).

Niels Christian Mortensen

1834–98

Residence: Huntsville, Weber Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 13 November 1883

Missionary labors: Århus Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 20 August 1885

Name of departure ship: Cato

Birth date: 4 July 1834

Birthplace: Højby, Holbæk, Denmark

Father: Nielsen, Morten

Mother: Andersdatter, Inger

Spouse: Christensen, Mariane

Marriage date: 1864

Marriage place: Huntsville, Weber Co., Utah

Spouse: Christensen, Thora Emeline (Emilia)

Death date: 26 September 1898

Death place: Huntsville, Weber Co., Utah

Burial place: Huntsville, Weber Co., Utah

In 1859, Niels was baptized by Hans Peter Lund. He labored as a local missionary in Denmark from 1856 to 1864 before immigrating to America. He crossed the plains in the John Smith Independent Company (Esshom, Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, 605).

He settled in Huntsville, Weber County, Utah. For many years, he acted as second counselor to Bishop Francis A. Hammond of the Huntsville Ward. During those years, he became known as the leading businessman in Ogden Valley. He was the first butter merchant in the valley. He sold his butter and eggs to markets in Salt Lake City (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 2:340).

Niels served a mission to Scandinavia from 1883 to 1885. He arrived in Copenhagen on 13 November 1883 and was assigned to labor in the Århus Conference. After completing this mission, he departed from Copenhagen on 20 August 1885 aboard the steamer Cato as the leader of 95 emigrating Latter-day Saints. Aboard the steamer Wisconsin that departed from Liverpool bound for America on 28 August 1885 he served as assistant to J. W. Thornley (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 274–75, 291).

After returning to the states, Niels was arrested for violating the Edmunds-Tucker law. He was imprisoned and fined three hundred dollars. His concern at that time was that his unusually heavy head of hair would be cut off, and he would catch a severe cold. After being released from prison, he served for many years as president of the Scandinavian meetings in Huntsville. Andrew Jenson said of him, “He died . . . firm in the faith as a Latter-day Saint” (Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 2:340). Niels died in 1898 in Huntsville at age sixty-four.


Mouritz Mouritsen

(Mouritz Larsen)

1849–1922

Residence: Smithfield, Cache Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 1 December 1885

Missionary labors: Ålborg Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 18 August 1887

Name of departure ship: Bravo

Birth date: 28 January 1849

Birthplace: Rønnovholm,Vrejlev, Hjørring, Denmark

Father: Mouritzen, Lars

Mother: Sørensdatter, Maren

Spouse: Hillyard, Mary Elizabeth

Marriage date: 3 May 1870

Spouse: Hansen, Carrie

Marriage date: 22 October, 1885

Marriage place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Spouse: Wildman, Susan Elizabeth

Marriage date: 22 October, 1885

Marriage place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Death date: 23 September 1922

Death place: Bennington, Bear Lake Co., Idaho

Burial place: Bennington, Bear, Lake Co., Idaho

Mouritz’s family heard the gospel in Denmark and emigrated from Copenhagen on 26 March 1859. His family arrived in New York on 13 May 1859. They took the train as far as Florence, Nebraska, and stayed in an old log house. During the night, a terrible storm came with lightening, thunder, and rain. As they were awakened, they thought the house was on fire. They tried to open the door but it wouldn’t open, and they broke out a window to find that the house was not on fire but that they were in a horrific storm. The family purchased a wagon, oxen, and cows and traveled across the plains with the Robert Nelson Company. They arrived in Salt Lake Valley on 15 September 1859, settling in Kaysville, Davis, Utah, where they stayed about two years. The family then moved to Plain City, Weber, Utah. Mouritz herded sheep in the day and played the violin for dances at night. In 1865 the family moved to Smithfield, Cache, Utah. He assisted his father in burning lime and making bricks (see Matthews, History of Bear Lake Pioneers, 476–477).

In 1870 Mouritz married Elizabeth Hilllyard. The couple had three girls and two boys. The two boys and one girl died before 5 January 1881 when Elizabeth died. He then married Carrie and Susan (see Matthews, History of Bear Lake Pioneers, 477).

Mouritz was residing in Smithfield when he was called on a mission to Denmark. He arrived in Copenhagen on 1 December 1885. He had a very pleasant mission and tired to prove his identity to his relatives by playing the songs on the violin that his father had played. He left Copenhagen on 18 August 1887 (see Matthews, History of Bear Lake Pioneers, 479).

He tried to move his families to Liberty, Bear Lake, Idaho, and then in 1890, he moved one family to Bennington, Bear Lake, Idaho, where he earned a living burning lime and making bricks. In 1893 he moved his other family to Bennington (see Matthews, History of Bear Lake Pioneers, 479).

In 1903 Susan and her family moved to Montpelier, Bear Lake, Idaho, where Mouritz found the grade of lime better for brickmaking. In 1907 Carrie died and Susan moved back to Bennington to take of the families (see Matthews, History of Bear Lake Pioneers, 479).

At one point, Mouritz contracted spotted fever. He was ill for about twenty-six months. He died on 23 September 1922 in Bennington. He had fifteen living children at the time of his death (see Matthews, History of Bear Lake Pioneers, 478).


Mourits Peder Mouritsen

(Mouritz Pedersen)

1857–1940

Residence: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Arrival date in Copenhagen: 18 September 1891,

Missionary labors: Ålborg Conference

Departure date from Copenhagen: 10 August 1893

Name of departure ship: Bravo

Birth date: 2 April 1857

Birthplace: Svenstrup, Ålborg, Denmark

Father: Mouritsen, Peder Christian

< lang="DA">Mother:< lang="DA"> Jørgensdatter, Inger

< lang="DA">Spouse:< lang="DA"> Jensen, Jensine Marie

< lang="DA"> Marriage date: 27 October 1881

Marriage place: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah

Death date: 21 September 1940

Death place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Burial place: Logan, Cache Co., Utah

Mourits spent many youthful days working for farmers. In fall 1876, he heard a gospel sermon preached in Anders Jensen’s house in Nørre Tranders. He was baptized at Ålborg on 3 January 1877 by Anders Frederiksen. He was ordained a teacher on 3 March 1877 and an elder on 12 November 1877. By fall 1877, he was called to labor as a local missionary in the Ålborg, Sæby, and Jylland branches. In 1878, he presided over the Thisted Branch. While laboring in these branches, he was arrested for preaching and jailed at Vestervig, Thisted County. He was liberated the next day (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:424).

Mourits immigrated to Utah and arrived in Salt Lake City on 29 July 1880. He settled in Manti, Sanpete County, and then in Logan, Cache County. He received his endowment on 27 October 1881 and was ordained a seventy on 22 January 1884 (see Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:424; FamilySearch).

Mourits returned to Logan where he was ordained a high priest and served as second counselor to Bishop Christian J. Larsen of the Logan Seventh Ward. During his years of ecclesiastical service, he formed a partnership with James Larsen—the M. & L. Coal and Wood Company. This became the leading coal company in Logan (see correspondence from Rita Leohandt, 2 August 1999; Jenson, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, 1:424).

Mourtis interrupted his career on 18 September 1891 to accept a mission call to Scandinavia. On this mission, he was appointed to labor in the Ålborg Conference. While attending to missionary work in the Frederikshavn Branch (Hjørring County), he was accosted by a schoolteacher for preaching Mormonism and was summoned to court. He failed to appear in court; he feared that such appearance would mean his banishment from the country. He continued his missionary activities elsewhere, baptizing 2 of his own sisters and about 20 converts (see Jenson, History of the Scandinavian Mission, 303, 321, 332).

When he returned to Logan in 1893, he continued his duties in the bishopric. He was also very involved in temple work. His posterity remembered that he loved the Book of Mormon and offered a prize of ten dollars to the first of his children to complete reading it (see correspondence from Rita Leohandt, 2 August 1999). Mourits died in 1940 at his home in Logan at age eighty-three (see “Mourits Mouritsen,” Salt Lake Tribune, 24 September 1940).